Bhramat: 8 definitions

Introduction:

Bhramat means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Bhramat (भ्रमत्) means “wandering”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.9.—Accordingly, as Brahmā narrated to Sage Nārada:—“O excellent sage, the lord of the mountains having thus explained to Menakā, both of them remained watching its result, pure in mind. When a few days passed by, lord Śiva, the goal of saintly men, the cause of protection and enjoyment wandering here and there [i.e., bhramat-sarvatra] in his flutter and excitement due to the separation from Satī, came there with pleasure accompanied by a few of his Gaṇas, in order to perform penance. The lord was completely agitated due to Satī’s love and separation from her. [...]”.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Discover the meaning of bhramat in the context of Purana from relevant books on Exotic India

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Bhramat (भ्रमत्) (Cf. Bhramantī) refers to “wandering”, according to the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, “[...] Placing her vessel in her hand, sealed with the Gesture of Space, She is the goddess (Nityā) in the Wheel of the Sky playing (there) with the Skyfarers within Emptiness. Her face the Void, she resides in the Void surrounded by accomplished yogis. Possessing a divine form, she wanders [i.e., bhramat] constantly in the six sacred seats and plays (there). Thus the great Śāmbhava form of Kujā has been described. [...]”.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

Discover the meaning of bhramat in the context of Shaktism from relevant books on Exotic India

Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

Source: Wisdom Library: Brihat Samhita by Varahamihira

Bhramat (भ्रमत्) refers to the “hovering (of bees)”, according to the Bṛhatsaṃhitā (chapter 12), an encyclopedic Sanskrit work written by Varāhamihira mainly focusing on the science of ancient Indian astronomy astronomy (Jyotiṣa).—Accordingly, “Again in the season of autumn will be found the blue and white lotus growing side by side, hovered over by beautiful lines of bees [i.e., bhramat-ṣaṭpada-paṅkti-bhūṣitā], tender creepers adding beauty to the scene; the season therefore resembles a charming woman with blue eyes, fair face, black hair and thin brows. As if to view the beauty of the pure disc of her lord—the Moon, the summer lake opens at night her red lotus buds—her eyes of soft petals in which lie concealed the black bee serving as the pupil of the eye”.

Jyotisha book cover
context information

Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

Discover the meaning of bhramat in the context of Jyotisha from relevant books on Exotic India

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions

Bhramat (भ्रमत्) refers to the “wandering” (of the Lord), according to the Vārāṇasīmāhātmya verse 1.116-125.—Accordingly, “Engaged in the path of the observance of the skull, the Lord wanders (bhramat), free from attachment, displaying the Lokamārga and the supreme Lokātīta. And the lokas are designated ‘bound souls’, including gods, demons and men. No one realizes the supreme certainty with respect to knowledge of the self. And except for Śarva, the supreme god, there is no such behaviour of another [God]. No other god has certainty of knowledge. There is no such behaviour anywhere in the world with all its Gods. [...]”.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

Discover the meaning of bhramat in the context of Shaivism from relevant books on Exotic India

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

Bhramat (भ्रमत्) or Paribhramat refers to “wandering” (in the cycle of rebirth), according to the 11th century Jñānārṇava, a treatise on Jain Yoga in roughly 2200 Sanskrit verses composed by Śubhacandra.—Accordingly, “On account of the difference between what is intentional [com.—is because of wandering (paribhramataḥ) in the cycle of rebirth (saṃsāre) in accordance with the instruction of a guru, etc. (gurūpadeśādinā)] and unintentional [com.—is because of wandering (bhramataḥ) in the cycle of rebirth (saṃsāre) without (vinā) virtue (dharma)] , wearing away karma has two varieties which are the cause for cutting off the many chains produced by actions. Just as fruits of a tree ripen of their own accord and from [different] means so in this world [the ripening] of karmas is to be understood as [being] of its own accord in the form of [different] means”.

General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

Discover the meaning of bhramat in the context of General definition from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Bhramat (भ्रमत्).—a. Wandering, roving &c.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Bhramat (भ्रमत्).—mfn. (-man-mantī-mat) 1. Going round, whirling, revolving. 2. Roving. 3. Erring. E. bhram to turn round, śatṛ aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Bhramāt (भ्रमात्):—[from bhrama > bhram] ind. by an error or mistake, [Gīta-govinda]

2) Bhramat (भ्रमत्):—[from bhram] mfn. wandering about, roaming, [Mahābhārata]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of bhramat in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

See also (Relevant definitions)

Relevant text

Let's grow together!

I humbly request your help to keep doing what I do best: provide the world with unbiased sources, definitions and images. Your donation direclty influences the quality and quantity of knowledge, wisdom and spiritual insight the world is exposed to.

Let's make the world a better place together!

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: