Bhiru, Bhīru: 18 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Bhiru means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Bhīru (भीरु).—A son born to Maṇibhadra and his wife Puṇyajanī.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1) Bhiru (भिरु).—A son of Maṇibhadra.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 69. 155.

2) Bhīru (भीरु).—A Yakṣa, son of Puṇyajanī and Maṇibhadra.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 7. 123.
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Discover the meaning of bhiru in the context of Purana from relevant books on Exotic India

Dharmashastra (religious law)

Source: archive.org: The religion and philosophy of the Veda and the Upanishads (dharmashastra)

Bhīru (भीरु) is the name of a deity to be invoked in a certain ritual, according to the Mānavagṛhyasūtra 2.14. Accordingly, the deity is prescribed when one suffers from possession by the Vināyakas, Śālakaṭaṅkaṭa, Kūṣmāṇḍarājaputra, Usmita and Devayajana. The Baijavāpagṛhyasūtra replaces the names of last two vināyakas with Mita and Sammita. According to R. C. Hazra in his Gaṇapati-worship, “this rite is both expiatory and propitiatory in nature and in which various things including meat and fish (both raw and cooked) and wine and cakes are to be offered”..

The gṛhya-sūtras are a branch of dharma-sūtras and refer to a category of Vedic literature dealing with domstic rites and rituals. The Mānava-gṛhya-sūtra belongs to the Kṛṣṇa-yajurveda. The Baijavāpa-gṛhya-sūtra is known only through references to it in other works (e.g., Vīramitrodaya-Saṃskāra).

Dharmashastra book cover
context information

Dharmashastra (धर्मशास्त्र, dharmaśāstra) contains the instructions (shastra) regarding religious conduct of livelihood (dharma), ceremonies, jurisprudence (study of law) and more. It is categorized as smriti, an important and authoritative selection of books dealing with the Hindu lifestyle.

Discover the meaning of bhiru in the context of Dharmashastra from relevant books on Exotic India

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Shodhganga: Dietetics and culinary art in ancient and medieval India

Bhīru (भीरु) refers to a type of fish whose meat (māṃsa) is classified as “aquatic” (apcara) according to the 17th century Bhojanakutūhala (dravyaguṇāguṇa-kathana), and is commonly found in literature dealing with the topics of dietetics and culinary art, also known as Pākaśāstra or Pākakalā.—The text [māṃsa-prakaraṇa] says the three fold division of meat [such as aquatic (apcara)...]. Here different types of meat and their properties are discussed in detail. The aquatic animals are [viz., bhīru].

Source: WorldCat: Rāj nighaṇṭu

Bhīrū (भीरू) is another name for Śatāvarī, a medicinal plant identified with Asparagus racemosus Willed. (or “buttermilk root”) from the Asparagaceae family of flowering plants, according to verse 4.116-119 of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu. The fourth chapter (śatāhvādi-varga) of this book enumerates eighty varieties of small plants (pṛthu-kṣupa). Together with the names Bhīrū and Śatāvarī, there are a total of thirty-two Sanskrit synonyms identified for this plant.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

Discover the meaning of bhiru in the context of Ayurveda from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

bhīru : (adj.) timid; fearful; cowardly.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Bhīru, (adj. n.) (fr. bhī; cp. Vedic bhīru) 1. fearful, i.e. having fear, timid, afraid, shy, cowardly Sdhp. 207 (dukkha°); usually in neg. abhīru not afraid, without fear, combined with anutrāsin: see utrāsin.—2. fearful, i.e. causing fear, awful, dreadful, terrible Pv. II, 41 (°dassana terrible to look at).—3. (m.) fear, cowardice Sn. 437 (=utrāsa SnA 390).

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

Discover the meaning of bhiru in the context of Pali from relevant books on Exotic India

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

bhīru (भीरु).—a (S) Timid, apprehensive, fearful. 2 Afraid of or fearing. In comp. as pāpabhīru, raṇabhīru.

--- OR ---

bhīrū (भीरू).—f S (A fearing or timid one.) A woman.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

bhīru (भीरु).—a Timid; afraid of.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

Discover the meaning of bhiru in the context of Marathi from relevant books on Exotic India

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Bhīru (भीरु).—a. (-ru or - f.) [भी-क्रु (bhī-kru); cf. P.III.2.174.]

1) Timid, cowardly, fearful; क्षान्त्या भीरुः (kṣāntyā bhīruḥ) H.2.26.

2) Afraid of; (mostly in comp.); पाप°, अधर्म°, प्रतिज्ञाभङ्ग° (pāpa°, adharma°, pratijñābhaṅga°) &c.

-ruḥ 1 A jackal.

2) A tiger.

3) A kind of sugarcane.

-ru n. Silver. -f.

1) A timid woman.

2) A goat.

3) A shadow.

4) A centipede.

--- OR ---

Bhīrū (भीरू).—f. A timid woman; त्वं रक्षसा भीरु यतोऽपनीता (tvaṃ rakṣasā bhīru yato'panītā) R.13.24.

See also (synonyms): bhīlū.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Bhiru (भिरु).—name of a minister of Rudrāyaṇa (bracketed with Hiru): Divyāvadāna 545.5.

--- OR ---

Bhīru (भीरु).—(nt.? = Pali id.; in Sanskrit only adj.), fear: ṣaṣṭhī (sc. Mārasya senā) bhīru pravuccati (so Senart, mss. pranandita, (u)panandati) Mahāvastu ii.240.5 (verse); in parallel Lalitavistara 262.16 bhayaṃ (v.l. bhaya) ṣaṣṭhī nirucyate.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Bhīru (भीरु).—mfn. (-ruḥ-ruḥ or -ruḥ-ru) Timid, fearful. f.

(-ruḥ-rūḥ) 1. A timid woman. 2. A plant, (Asparagus racemosus.) 3. A sort of prickly nightshade. 4. A jackal. 5. A centipede. 6. A tiger. 7. A goat. n. (-ru) Silver. E. bhī to fear, Unadi aff. kru; also ra being changed to u, bhīlu .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Bhīru (भीरु).—[bhī + ru], I. adj., f. ru or , Timid, [Pañcatantra] iii. [distich] 25. Ii. m. 1. A jackal. 2. A tiger. Iii. f. ru or . 1. A timid woman, [Vikramorvaśī, (ed. Bollensen.)] [distich] 5. 2. A plant, Asparagus racemosa. 3. A sert of prickly nightṣade. 4. A centipede. 5. A goat.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Bhīru (भीरु).—([feminine] bhīru & bhīrū, [vocative] bhīru) timid, cowardly, shy, afraid of ([ablative] or —°, paratra of the other world). — Abstr. bhīru++tā† [feminine], tva† [neuter]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Bhiru (भिरु):—m. Name of a man (also ruka), [Divyāvadāna]

2) Bhīru (भीरु):—[from bhī] mf(U)n. fearful, timid, cowardly, afraid of ([ablative] or [compound]), [Ṛg-veda] etc. etc.

3) [v.s. ...] (with paratra) dreading the beyond or the hereafter, [Yājñavalkya [Scholiast or Commentator]] (ifc. expressive of blame, [Gaṇaratna-mahodadhi on Pāṇini 2-1, 53])

4) [v.s. ...] m. a jackal, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.] (cf. pheru)

5) [v.s. ...] a tiger, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) [v.s. ...] various kinds of fish, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

7) [v.s. ...] a centipede, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

8) [v.s. ...] a kind of sugarcane, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

9) [v.s. ...] Asparagus Racemosus, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

10) [v.s. ...] f. a timid woman ([especially] [vocative case] ‘bhīru’, ‘O timid one!’), [Kāvya literature]

11) [v.s. ...] a shadow, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

12) [v.s. ...] a she-goat, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

13) [v.s. ...] Solanum Jacquini, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

14) [v.s. ...] n. a species of plant, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

15) [v.s. ...] silver, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of bhiru in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

See also (Relevant definitions)

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: