Bherunda, Bheruṇḍa, Bheruṇḍā: 14 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Bherunda means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: archive.org: The mirror of gesture (abhinaya-darpana)

One of the saṃyutta-hastāni (Twenty-four combined Hands).—Bheruṇḍa: the wrists of Kapittha hands are joined. Usage: pair of Bheruṇḍas.

Natyashastra book cover
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Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Bherunda in Purana glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1) Bheruṇḍa (भेरुण्ड).—A bird, born of Jaṭāyu.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 6. 36.

2) Bheruṇḍā (भेरुण्डा).—An Akṣaradevī.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa IV. 19. 58; 25. 95; 37. 33.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Goddess Traditions in Tantric Hinduism

1) Bheruṇḍa (भेरुण्ड) refers to two fierce birds, according to Hemacandra’s lexical Anekārthasaṃgraha (verse 3.173cd).

2) Bheruṇḍā (भेरुण्डा) is a specific deity (Goddess) according to the same work.—Several texts in connection with Tvaritā and Kurukullā that also feature Bheruṇḍā: the Saṃhitāsāra, Haramekhalā, and Ḍalhaṇa’s commentary to several Suśrutasaṃhitā passages all seem to refer to the independent snakebite goddess. We also have references to her in the Rasaratnākara’s toxicology (viṣacikitsā) section, Yogaratnāvalī 122, and Bhairavapadmāvatīkalpa 10.12. Without exception the passages are brief, sometimes only half a verse. They say that the Bheruṇḍā spell should be chanted in the ear of a bite victim to free him of the venom. With the exception of Ḍalhaṇa, who declines to give the spell directly, all of these sources or their commentaries teach a Prakrit spell for Bheruṇḍā.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Tibetan Buddhism

Bheruṇḍa (भेरुण्ड) is the name of a Mahoraga mentioned as attending the teachings in the 6th century Mañjuśrīmūlakalpa: one of the largest Kriyā Tantras devoted to Mañjuśrī (the Bodhisattva of wisdom) representing an encyclopedia of knowledge primarily concerned with ritualistic elements in Buddhism. The teachings in this text originate from Mañjuśrī and were taught to and by Buddha Śākyamuni in the presence of a large audience (including Bheruṇḍa).

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Bheruṇḍa.—(EI 31), a shortened form of gaṇḍabheruṇḍa (q. v.). Note: bheruṇḍa is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Bheruṇḍa (भेरुण्ड).—a. Terrible, frightful, awful, fearful.

-ṇḍaḥ A species of bird.

-ṇḍam Conception, pregnancy.

-ṇḍā f.

1) Name of a Yakṣiṇī.

2) Name of a goddess; महाविश्वेश्वरी श्वेता भेरुण्डा कुलसुन्दरी (mahāviśveśvarī śvetā bheruṇḍā kulasundarī) Kālī. P.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Bheruṇḍa (भेरुण्ड).—name of a serpent king: (Ārya-)Mañjuśrīmūlakalpa 18.24. Cf. Bhūruṇḍa, Maruṇḍa. (Cf. also prec.)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Bheruṇḍa (भेरुण्ड).—mfn.

(-ṇḍaḥ-ṇḍā-ṇḍaṃ) Formidable, fearful. f.

(-ṇḍā) One of the Yakshinis, or female attendants on Durga. m.

(-ṇḍaḥ) A particular deity; a form of Siva, according to the Tantras. n.

(-ṇḍaṃ) Conception, impregnation. E. bhī to fear, deriv. irr.; it is sometimes read bharaṇḍa .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Bheruṇḍa (भेरुण्ड).—I. (vb. bhi), adj. Formidable. Ii. m. A form of Śiva. Iii. f. ḍā, One of the Yakṣiṇīs or female attendants on Durgā. Iv. n. (vb. bhṛ), Conception.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Bheruṇḍa (भेरुण्ड).—[adjective] terrible, awful. [masculine] a kind of bird or beast of prey; [feminine] ā [Name] of a goddess.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Bheruṇḍa (भेरुण्ड):—[from bhera] mf(ā)n. (often [varia lectio] bheraṇḍa) terrible, formidable, awful, [Mahābhārata]

2) [v.s. ...] m. a species of bird, [Mahābhārata; Harṣacarita]

3) [v.s. ...] (also ḍaka) a beast of prey (wolf, jackal, fox, or hyena), [Lalita-vistara] (cf. pheru)

4) [v.s. ...] a [particular] form of Śiva (?), [Horace H. Wilson]

5) Bheruṇḍā (भेरुण्डा):—[from bheruṇḍa > bhera] f. Name of a goddess (= kālī), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) [v.s. ...] of a Yakṣiṇī, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

7) Bheruṇḍa (भेरुण्ड):—[from bhera] n. (√bhṛ?) pregnancy, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Bheruṇḍa (भेरुण्ड):—[(ṇḍaḥ-ṇḍā-ṇḍaṃ) a.] Formidable. m. A form of Shiva. f. One of Durgā's attendants. n. Conception.

[Sanskrit to German] (Deutsch Wörterbuch)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Böhtlingk and Roth Grosses Petersburger Wörterbuch

Bheruṇḍa (भेरुण्ड):—

1) adj. f. ā schrecklich, Grausen erregend (vgl. bhī) [Hemacandra’s Anekārthasaṃgraha 3, 184] (bheraṇḍa gedr.). [Medinīkoṣa ḍ. 34. fg.] [Śabdaratnāvalī im Śabdakalpadruma] [Mahābhārata 3, 13736.] —

2) m. a) Vogel (wohl ein best. Vogel; vgl. bhāraṇḍa, bhāruṇḍa) [Hemacandra’s Anekārthasaṃgraha] (bheraṇḍa gedr.). — b) ein best. Raubthier (Wolf, Schakal oder Hyäne) [Lot. de Lassen’s Anthologie b. l. 371.] — c) eine Form des Śiva [WILSON] angeblich nach [Medinīkoṣa] —

3) f. ā a) Nomen proprium einer Göttin [Medinīkoṣa] = kālī nach [Śabdakalpadruma] mit folgendem Belege: trikoṇanilayā nityā paramāmṛtarañjitā . mahāvidyeśvarī svetā (sic) bheruṇḍā (adj. schrecklich) kulasundarī .. iti kālīkulasarvasve śrīśivaparaśurāmasaṃvāda ādyāyāḥ sahasranāmastotram .. — b) Nomen proprium einer Yakṣiṇī [Medinīkoṣa] —

4) n. Schwangerschaft [Śabdaratnāvalī]

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Bheruṇḍa (भेरुण्ड):—

3) a) vgl. meruṇḍā .

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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