Bharu, Bhāru: 15 definitions

Introduction:

Bharu means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Bhāru (भारु).—A daughter of Dakṣaprajāpati. The prajāpati, at one stage begot sixty girls of Vairiṇī and gave them to Kaśyapa, who distributed them among several Devas. Bhāru was the woman so given to the Viśvadevatās. (Hari Vaṃśa, Chapter 3).

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

Source: Wisdom Library: Brihat Samhita by Varahamihira

Bharu (भरु) (or Maru) possibly refers to an ancient kingdom mentioned in the Bṛhatsaṃhitā (chapter 5), an encyclopedic Sanskrit work written by Varāhamihira mainly focusing on the science of ancient Indian astronomy astronomy (Jyotiṣa).—Accordingly, “If the sun and moon should begin to be eclipsed when only half risen, deceitful men will suffer as well as sacrificial rites. [...] If they should be eclipsed when in the sign of Libra (Tulā), the people of the extreme border lands on the west, the people of Sindha, the trading classes  [+ Maru/Bharu ?] and the people of Kaccha will be afflicted with miseries. If when in the sign of Scorpio (Vṛścika), the people of Udambara, of Madra, of Colā and of Yaudheya will all suffer miseries along with soldiers armed with poisoned weapons”.

Jyotisha book cover
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Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names

The name of a king, a country, and its capital.

See the Bharu Jataka and Bharukaccha.

The name of the king and the country in the Supparaka Jataka are also identical.

context information

Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

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India history and geography

Source: Ancient Buddhist Texts: Geography of Early Buddhism

Bharu (भरु) is the name of an ancient locality situated in Majjhimadesa (Middle Country) of ancient India, as recorded in the Pāli Buddhist texts (detailing the geography of ancient India as it was known in to Early Buddhism).—In the Bharu Jātaka we find a reference to the kingdom of Bharu ruled over by a king named Bharu. It is difficult to locate the kingdom.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Bharu, (a dial. (inscription) word, cp. Kern, Toev. s. v. ) sea, in two names for a town and a kingdom viz. Bharukaccha Nd1 155; J. II, 188; IV, 137, and Bharu-raṭṭha J. II, 169 sq. , a kingdom which is said to have been swallowed up by the sea.—Also in N. of the King of that country Bharu-rājā J. II, 171 (v. l. Kuru°).—Der. Bhārukacchaka an inhabitant of Bharukaccha DhsA. 305 (so read at Expos. II. 401). (Page 499)

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Bharu (भरु).—

1) A husband.

2) A lord.

3) Name of Śiva.

4) Of Viṣṇu.

5) Gold; Mb.2.

6) The sea.

Derivable forms: bharuḥ (भरुः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Bharu (भरु).—m.

(-ruḥ) 1. A name of Vishnu. 2. A name of Siva. 3. Gold. 4. A husband, a lord. 5. The sea. E. bhṛ to nourish, Unadi aff. un .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Bharu (भरु).—i. e. bhṛ + u, m. 1. Gold. 2. A lord. 3. Śiva. 4. Viṣṇu.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Bharu (भरु).—[masculine] [Epithet] of Viṣṇu & Śiva.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Bharu (भरु):—[from bhara] m. a lord, master, [Uṇādi-sūtra i, 7 [Scholiast or Commentator]]

2) [v.s. ...] a husband, [Demetrius Galanos’s Lexiko: sanskritikes, anglikes, hellenikes]

3) [v.s. ...] Name of Viṣṇu or Śiva ([dual number] V° and Ś°), [Kādambarī]

4) [v.s. ...] gold, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) [v.s. ...] the sea, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) Bhāru (भारु):—m. Name of a son of Kṛṣṇa, [Viṣṇu-purāṇa]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Bharu (भरु):—(ruḥ) 2. m. A name of Vishnu; Shiva; gold; a husband.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Bharu (भरु) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Bharu.

[Sanskrit to German]

Bharu in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

Bharu (भरु) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Bharu.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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