Bhanu, Bhānu, Bhāṇu: 20 definitions

Introduction

Bhanu means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Buddhism, Pali, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: Wisdom Library: Bhagavata Purana

Bhānu (भानु):—Son of Prativyoma (son of Vatsavṛddha). He will be born in the future and become a king. He will have a son called Divāka. (see Bhāgavata Purāṇa 9.12.10)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

1) Bhānu (भानु).—A son born to Kṛṣṇa of Satyabhāmā. (Daśama Skandha, Bhāgavata).

2) Bhānu (भानु).—Son of Dyau; this Bhānu was a guru of Sūrya. (Śloka 42, Chapter 1, Ādi Parva, Mahābhārata).

3) Bhānu (भानु).—A devagandharva born to Kaśyapa prajāpati of his wife Pṛthā. (Śloka 47, Chapter 65, Ādi Parva, Mahābhārata).

4) Bhānu (भानु).—He is the son of an agni called Pāñcajanya. He is born of the spiritual essence of Aṅgiras and Cyavana. This Bhānu is called Manu and Bṛhadbhānu. (Chapters 220 and 221, Vana Parva, Mahābhārata).

5) Bhānu (भानु).—A king of ancient Bhārata. This king took a flying tour of Kurukṣetra in Indra’s aeroplane to witness the battle between Arjuna and Droṇa. (Śloka 9, Chapter 56, Virāṭa Parva, Mahābhārata).

6) Bhānu (भानु).—A yādava. He learnt the art of archery from Pradyumna. Sahadeva married the daughter of this Bhānu called Bhānumatī. (Vana Parva, 180, 27 and Harivaṃśa 2.20.12).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1a) Bhānu (भानु).—A daughter of Dakṣa and one of the ten wives of Dharma;1 her sons were Bhānavas of whom Devaṛṣabha was one.2

  • 1) Bhāgavata-purāṇa VI. 6. 4-5; Matsya-purāṇa 5. 15; Vāyu-purāṇa 66. 2; Viṣṇu-purāṇa I. 15. 105.
  • 2) Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 3. 2, 32; Matsya-purāṇa 5. 18; Viṣṇu-purāṇa I. 15. 106.

1b) A son of Prativyoman and father of Divā(r)ka.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa IX. 12. 10.

1c) A son of Kṛṣṇa and Satyabhāmā;1 went out with his brothers for sport and seeing a huge lizard on a wall reported it to Kṛṣṇa;2 got himself killed in Prabhāsā.3

  • 1) Bhāgavata-purāṇa X. 61. 10; 90. 33; Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 71. 247-48; Matsya-purāṇa 47. 17; Vāyu-purāṇa 96. 238; Viṣṇu-purāṇa V. 32. 1.
  • 2) Bhāgavata-purāṇa X. 64. 1-4.
  • 3) Ib. XI. 30. 17.

1d) A son of Krodhā and a Devagandharva.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 6. 39.

1e) One of the 20 Sutapa gods.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa IV. 1. 15; Vāyu-purāṇa 100. 15.

1f) One of the four sons of Svārociṣa Manu.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 9. 7.

1g) The father of Bhānavas.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 203. 8; Vāyu-purāṇa 66. 33.

1h) A daughter of Satyabhāmā.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 96. 240.

1i) A son of Bhārga and father of Trayīsānu.*

  • * Viṣṇu-purāṇa IV. 16. 3.
Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Bhānu (भानु) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. I.59.46, I.65, I.221.8, I.221) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Bhānu) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

Source: Wisdom Library: Jyotiṣa

Bhānu (भानु, “brightness”) refers to the sun, which is also known as ravi, sūrya or āditya, amonst others. The corresponding day of the week is sunday (bhānuvāra). The term is used throughout Jyotiṣa literature.

Jyotisha book cover
context information

Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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Vastushastra (architecture)

Source: Wisdom Library: Vāstu-śāstra

Bhānu (भानु, “sunday”) corresponds with the sun and refers to the first of seven vāra (days), according to the Mānasāra. It is also known by the name Sūrya. Vāra is the fourth of the āyādiṣaḍvarga, or “six principles” that constitute the “horoscope” of an architectural or iconographic object. Their application is intended to “verify” the measurements of the architectural and iconographic object against the dictates of astrology that lay out the conditions of auspiciousness.

The particular day, or vāra (eg., bhānu) of all architectural and iconographic objects (settlement, building, image) must be calculated and ascertained. This process is based on the principle of the remainder. An arithmetical formula to be used in each case is stipulated, which engages one of the basic dimensions of the object (breadth, length, or perimeter/circumference). Among these vāras, Guru (Thursday), Śukra (Friday), Budha (Wednesday) and Śaśi or Candra (Monday), are considered auspicious and therefore, to be preferred. The text states, however, that the inauspiciousness of the other three days are nullified if there occurs a śubhayoga, “auspicious conjunction (of planets)” on those days.

Vastushastra book cover
context information

Vastushastra (वास्तुशास्त्र, vāstuśāstra) refers to the ancient Indian science (shastra) of architecture (vastu), dealing with topics such architecture, sculpture, town-building, fort building and various other constructions. Vastu also deals with the philosophy of the architectural relation with the cosmic universe.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Jainism

Bhānu (भानु) is the father of Dharmanātha, the fifteenth of twenty-four Tīrthaṅkaras in Janism, according to the Ācāradinakara (14th century work on Jain conduct written by Vardhamāna Sūri). A Tīrthaṅkara is an enlightened being who has conquered saṃsāra (cycle of birth and death), leaving behind him a path for others to follow.

The wife of Bhānu is Suvratā. It is an ancient Jain practice to worship the Tīrthaṅkara’s parents in various rites, such as the pratiṣṭhāvidhi.

Source: archive.org: Personal and geographical names in the Gupta inscriptions (jainism)

Bhāṇu (भाणु) is a Prakrit ending for deriving proper personal names, mentioned as an example in the Aṅgavijjā chapter 26. This chapter includes general rules to follow when deriving proper names. The Aṅgavijjā (mentioning bhāṇu) is an ancient treatise from the 3rd century CE dealing with physiognomic readings, bodily gestures and predictions and was written by a Jain ascetic in 9000 Prakrit stanzas.

Source: archive.org: The Jaina Iconography

Bhānu (भानु) or Bhānurāja is the father of Dharmanātha: the fifteenth of twenty-four Tīrthaṃkaras or Jinas, commonly depicted in Jaina iconography.—Dharmanātha’s father’s name was Bhānu Rāja and his mother’s name Suvratā. He was born at Ratnapura. He obtained the name of Dharmanātha because he saved mankind from miseries. There is tradition also that the Jina’s mother performed many acts of religion while bearing him in the womb. Hence the name of the child as Dharmanātha.

General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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India history and geogprahy

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Bhānu.—(IE 7-1-2; EI 25), ‘twelve’. Note: bhānu is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

bhānu : (m.) 1. light; 2. the sun.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Bhānu, (adj.) (cp. Vedic bhānu (m.) shine, light, ray; Epic Sk. also “sun”) light, bright red J. III, 62 (of the kaṇavera flower); VvA. 175 (°raṃsi). (Page 502)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

bhānu (भानु).—m S The sun.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

bhānu (भानु).—m The sun.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Bhānu (भानु).—[bhā-nu Uṇ.3.32]

1) Light, lustre, brightness.

2) A ray of light; मण्डिताखिलदिक्प्रान्ताश्चण्डांशोः पान्तु भानवः (maṇḍitākhiladikprāntāścaṇḍāṃśoḥ pāntu bhānavaḥ) Bv.1.129; Śi.2.53; Ms.8.132.

3) The sun; भानुः सकृद्युक्ततुरङ्ग एव (bhānuḥ sakṛdyuktaturaṅga eva) Ś.5.4; भीमभानौ निदाघे (bhīmabhānau nidāghe) Bv.1.3.

4) Beauty.

5) A day.

6) A king, prince, sovereign.

7) An epithet of Śiva or Viṣṇu; अमृतांशूद्भवो भानुः (amṛtāṃśūdbhavo bhānuḥ) V. Sah. -f. A handsome woman.

Derivable forms: bhānuḥ (भानुः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Bhānu (भानु).—m.

(-nuḥ) 1. The sun. 2. Light. 3. A ray of light. 4. A master. 5. A sovereign, a prince. 6. The father of the fifteenth Jaina pontiff. 7. Beauty. 8. A day. 9. An epithet of Siva. f.

(-nuḥ) A handsome woman. E. bhā to shine, Unadi aff. nu .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Bhānu (भानु).—[bhā + nu], I. m. 1. A ray of light, Chr. 288, 9 = [Rigveda.] i. 48, 9. 2. Light. 3. The sun, [Pañcatantra] 134, 17. 4. A sovereign, a master. Ii. f. A handsome woman.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Bhānu (भानु).—[masculine] light, beam, the sun; [Name] of an Āditya, [plural] the Ādityas.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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