Bhagna: 17 definitions

Introduction:

Bhagna means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Bhragn.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: archive.org: Sushruta samhita, Volume II

Bhagnam (fractures and dislocations etc. of bones). Various kinds of fracture may be caused from a variety of causes, such as by a fall, pressure, blow, violent jerking or by the bites of ferocious beasts etc. These cases may be grouped under the two main subdivisions such as Sandhi-Muktam (dislocation) and Kānda-Bhagnam (fracture of a kānda).

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Bhagna (भग्न) refers to “snapping” (i.e., the ‘breaking’ of a weapon), according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.17 (“The dialogue between Indra and Kāmadeva”).—Accordingly, as Brahmā said to Kāma: “[...] Securing a wonderful boon from Brahmā, the great demon Tāraka has become invincible and a pest for everyone. [...] The noose of Varuṇa, the god of waters, snapped [i.e., bhagna]. When hurled at his neck by Viṣṇu, the discus Sudarśana was blunted. The death of this wicked demon has been foretold by Brahmā, the lord of the people, at the hands of the boy born of Śiva. the great Yogin. O dear friend, this task must be achieved by you diligently. Then we, the gods, can be very happy. [...]”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

Source: Shree Bharathavilasam Vaidyasala: Ayurvedic Version on treatment for bone fractures

In Ayurveda fracture is known by the name of “Bhagna”. Bhagna is fracture or dislocation of joint or bone. Charaka Samhita has described Asthi Bhagna in the Vrana chapter. It is said that a wound with a Bhagna heals with difficulty. General treatment of Bhagna includes Asthi Sandhana. The Bhagna is mainly divided as Sandhimukta (dislocation) and Kandabhagna (fractures).

In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra

Bhagna (भग्न) refers to “destruction” (e.g., of the past mind), according to Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra (chapter 31).—Accordingly, “[...] The past mind (atītacitta), being already destroyed (bhagna), does not experience the happiness; the future mind (anāgata-citta), being not yet born (utpanna), does not experience the happiness; the present mind (pratyutpanna-citta), being momentary (ekakṣaṇika) and fleeting (kṣipra), does not have the awareness to experience the happiness”.

Mahayana book cover
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Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Bhagna.—(CII 1), ‘departed’, ‘lost’, i. e. ‘inferior’; cf. the Hindī verb bhāgnā, Bengali bhāgā. Cf. bhagna-viśīrṇa-samāracana, repairs to the rents in and the wornout parts of a building (Ep. Ind., Vol. XXXIV, p. 144). Note: bhagna is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

bhagna (भग्न).—p (S) Broken. 2 fig. Routed, shattered, shivered, destroyed, demolished, marred, blasted. See fully under bhaṅga.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

bhagna (भग्न).—p Broken. Fig. Shattered, routed.

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Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Bhagna (भग्न).—p. p. [bhañj-kta]

1) Broken, fractured, shattered, torn; रथोद्वहनखिन्नाश्च भग्ना मे रथवाजिनः (rathodvahanakhinnāśca bhagnā me rathavājinaḥ) Rām.6.14.16.

2) Frustrated, foiled, disappointed.

3) Checked, arrested, suspended.

4) Marred, impaired.

5) Routed, completely defeated or vanquished; त्वर तेन महाबाहो भग्न एष न संशयः (tvara tena mahābāho bhagna eṣa na saṃśayaḥ) Rām.6.88.4; U.5.

6) Demolished, destroyed. (See bhañj).

-gnam Fracture of the leg.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Bhagna (भग्न).—mfn.

(-gnaḥ-gnā-gnaṃ) 1. Torn, broken. 2. Overcome, defeated. 3. Disregarded, despised. 4. Disappointed. 5. Destroyed. 6. Checked. n.

(-gnaṃ) Fracture of the leg. E. bhañj to break, aff. kta .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Bhagna (भग्न).—[adjective] broken, bent, curved; scattered, defeated, disappointed, marred, destroyed, annihilated, lost; [abstract] [feminine]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Bhagna (भग्न):—a etc. See under √bhañj.

2) [from bhañj] b mfn. broken ([literally] and [figuratively]), shattered, split, torn, defeated, checked, frustrated, disturbed, disappointed, [Manu-smṛti; Mahābhārata] etc. (sometimes forming the first instead of the second part of a [compound] e.g. grīvā-bhagna, dharma-bh for bhagna-grīva, -dharma; also ‘one who has broken a limb’ [Bhāgavata-purāṇa])

3) [v.s. ...] bent, curved, [Rāmāyaṇa]

4) [v.s. ...] lost, [Manu-smṛti viii, 148]

5) [v.s. ...] n. the fracture of a leg, [Suśruta]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Bhagna (भग्न):—[(gnaḥ-gnā-gnaṃ) a.] Broken; overcome; disappointed.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Bhagna (भग्न) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Karaṃjia, Ṇīraṃjia, Bhagga, Musumūria, Viria, Vemaia, Sūria.

[Sanskrit to German]

Bhagna in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

1) Bhagna (भग्न) [Also spelled bhragn]:—(a) broken, shattered; demoralised; ~[krama] put into disarray, (rendered) disorderly; ~[citta] demoralised; disappointed, dejected; ~[manā] see ~[citta]; ~[manoratha] frustrated; ~[māna] insulted, humiliated; ~[hṛdaya] brokenhearted, frustrated; hence ~[hṛdayatā] (nf).

2) Bhagna in Hindi refers in English to:—(v) to run, to run away; to escape; to flee; to take to heels; to abscond, to give the slip; to make off; to elope (with); [bhagate bhuta ki lamgoti bhali] salvage what you can of a bad debt..—bhagna (भागना) is alternatively transliterated as Bhāganā.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Bhagna (ಭಗ್ನ):—

1) [adjective] split or cracked into pieces; splintered, fractured, burst, etc.; broken.

2) [adjective] overpowered or defeated in a combat, competition, etc.; vanquished.

3) [adjective] demolished; destroyed; ruined; dilapidated.

4) [adjective] discouraged or kept from doing or pursuing something by failure, deception, fear, diffidence, etc.

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Bhagna (ಭಗ್ನ):—[noun] that which is broken, split, divided.

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Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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