Bhagini, Bhaginī, Bhāginī: 25 definitions

Introduction:

Bhagini means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

Bhaginī (भगिनी, “sister”) refers to a specific “mode of address” (nāman) used in drama (nāṭya), according to Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 19. Bhagini is used in addressing the elder sister.

Natyashastra book cover
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Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Bhaginī (भगिनी) refers to the “sister”, which should never be looked upon with a reprehensible vision (kudṛṣṭi), according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.2.3. Accordingly, while Dharma eulogised Śiva:—“[...] Sister (bhaginī), brother’s wife and daughter are like one’s mother. A sensible man shall never look at them with a reprehensible vision (kudṛṣṭi). The conclusion of the path of the Vedas is present in your mouth. O Brahmā, how is it that you forgot that under the influence of momentary passion?”.

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Bhagini (भगिनि).—A word used in addressing women. Verse 129 in chapter two of the Manusmṛti lays down that the wife of another person and women who are not one’s relatives should be addressed either as Bhavati, Subhage or Bhagini.

Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Bhāginī (भागिनी) refers to the name of a Lady mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. IX.45.11). Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Bhāginī) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Bhaginī (भगिनी) refers to “sister”, according to the second recension of the Yogakhaṇḍa of the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, as the Goddess Kumārī said to Ṛṣi Vyāsa said: “Vyāsa’s state is nothing (real). O Śaṃkara, (there is nothing) of mine (I can give) you. [...] And (there is) Māyā in the form of one's sister [i.e., bhaginī] and she is (one's) daughter due to Māyā. And that pure mother is Māyā. Another Māyā is the (liberating) sixteenth energy (of the moon). [...]”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: SOAS University of London: Protective Rites in the Netra Tantra

Bhaginī (भगिनी) refers to a “group of supernatural beings” that cause illness, according to the Netratantra of Kṣemarāja: a Śaiva text from the 9th century in which Śiva (Bhairava) teaches Pārvatī topics such as metaphysics, cosmology, and soteriology.—The Netratantra’s Second Chapter begins with the goddess Pārvatī’s request that Śiva reveal to her the remedy for the ailments that afflict divine and worldly beings. [...]. Śiva adds to the list of maladies a group of supernatural beings that cause illness: [e.g., Bhaginīs], [...]. That Śiva discusses supernatural beings that cause such disease demonstrates how invisible forces affect the world in observable ways. In order to counter these forces, Śiva reveals another invisible but observable element, mantra.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra

Bhaginī (भगिनी, “older sister”).—According to the 2nd century Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra (chapter XIV), “all beings obtained the mind of equanimity (samacitta) by thinking of one another with the feelings one would feel (for example) for one’s older sister (bhaginī)”.

In the course of innumerable generations, all beings have been one’s older sister (bhaginī), father, mother, elder brother, younger brother, younger sister and relative. Furthermore, according to the true nature (satyalakṣaṇa) of dharmas, there is no father or mother, no elder or younger brother; but people who are submerged in the error of self believe in their existence and thus there is the question of father and mother, elder and younger brother. Therefore it is not a lie when, by virtue of a wholesome mind (kuśalacitta), we consider one another with the feelings we would feel (for example) for an older sister (bhaginī).

Source: academia.edu: A Study and Translation of the Gaganagañjaparipṛcchā

Bhaginī (भगिनी) refers to a “sister”, according to the Gaganagañjaparipṛcchā: the eighth chapter of the Mahāsaṃnipāta (a collection of Mahāyāna Buddhist Sūtras).—Accordingly: “[...] Then the Bodhisatva Gaganagañja said this to the women: ‘Sisters (bhaginī), bring your respective husbands just as they were’. Then the women, having brought their respective husbands, being filled with rejoicing and happiness of mind, returned to their respective homes. After that, by those magically conjured-up beings, during seven days, the women were brought to maturity, in the way that they attained the stage of not falling back from the supreme and perfect awakening. [...]”.

Mahayana book cover
context information

Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Tibetan Buddhism

1) Bhaginī (भगिनी) is the name of Vidyārājñī (i.e., “wisdom queen”) mentioned as attending the teachings in the 6th century Mañjuśrīmūlakalpa: one of the largest Kriyā Tantras devoted to Mañjuśrī (the Bodhisattva of wisdom) representing an encyclopedia of knowledge primarily concerned with ritualistic elements in Buddhism. The teachings in this text originate from Mañjuśrī and were taught to and by Buddha Śākyamuni in the presence of a large audience (including Bhaginī).

2) Bhaginī (भगिनी) also refers to a group of deities summoned by the Yamāntaka-mantra and mentioned as attending the teachings in the 6th century Mañjuśrīmūlakalpa.

Source: academia.edu: A Critical Study of the Vajraḍākamahātantrarāja (II)

Bhaginī (भगिनी) is the name of a Vākchomā (‘verbal secrect sign’) which has its meaning defined as ‘ḍākinī’ according to chapter 8 of the 9th-century Vajraḍākamahātantrarāja, a scripture belonging to the Buddhist Cakrasaṃvara (or Saṃvara) scriptural cycle. These Vākchomās (viz., bhaginī) are meant for verbal communication and can be regarded as popular signs, since they can be found in the three biggest works of the Cakrasaṃvara literature.

Source: academia.edu: The Structure and Meanings of the Heruka Maṇḍala

Bhaginī (भगिनी) is the name of a Ḍākinī who, together with the Vīra (hero) named Bhagin forms one of the 36 pairs situated in the Agnicakra, according to the 10th century Ḍākārṇava chapter 15. Accordingly, the agnicakra refers to one of the three divisions of the saṃbhoga-puṭa (‘enjoyment layer’), situated in the Herukamaṇḍala. The 36 pairs of Ḍākinīs [viz., Bhaginī] and Vīras are red in color; they each have one face and four arms; they hold a skull bowl, a skull staff, a small drum, and a knife.

Source: 84000: Sampuṭodbhava Tantra (Emergence from Sampuṭa)

Bhaginī (भगिनी) refers to “sister” and is another name for Wisdom (prajñā), according to the Sampuṭodbhavatantra chapter 1.—Accordingly, “[...] Wisdom (prajñā) is called mother Because she gives birth to the people of the world. Wisdom is also called sister [i.e., bhaginī] Because she betokens a dowry. Wisdom is called washer-woman Because she delights all beings. Accordingly, she is called rajakī. Wisdom is called daughter (duhitṛ) Because she suckles (duhana) the milk of qualities. Wisdom is called artiste On account of being moved by great compassion. [...]”.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Bhagini in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

bhaginī : (f.) sister.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Bhaginī, (f.) (Epic Sk. bhaginī) a sister J. VI, 32. The popular etym. of bh. as given at VbhA. 108 is the same as that for bhātar, viz. “bhagatī ti bh.” — Cpd. bhagini-māla a “sister garland” (?) N. of a tree J. VI, 270 (=upari-bhaddaka). (Page 495)

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

bhaginī (भगिनी).—f (S) A sister.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

bhaginī (भगिनी).—f A sister.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Bhaginī (भगिनी).—[bhagaṃ yatnaḥ aṃśo vā pitrādīnāṃ dravyādāne'styasyāḥ ini ṅīp]

1) A sister.

2) A fortunate woman.

3) A woman in general.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Bhaginī (भगिनी) or Kumārī.—(1), q.v.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Bhaginī (भगिनी).—f. (-nī) 1. A sister. 2. A lucky woman. 3. A woman in general. E. bhaga prosperity, desire, ini and ṅīp affs.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Bhaginī (भगिनी).—i. e. bhaga + in + ī, f. 1. A sister, [Pañcatantra] 214, 25; 222, 9. 2. A woman in general.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Bhaginī (भगिनी):—[from bhagin > bhaj] a f. See below.

2) [from bhaj] b f. a sister (‘the happy or fortunate one’, as having a brother), [Manu-smṛti; Mahābhārata] etc. (in familiar speech, also for -bhrātṛ, ‘brother’ [Pañcatantra])

3) [v.s. ...] any woman or wife, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) Bhāginī (भागिनी):—[from bhāgin > bhāga] f. a co-heiress, [ib.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Bhaginī (भगिनी):—(nī) 3. f. A sister.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Bhaginī (भगिनी) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Bahiṇiā, Bahiṇī, Bhaigi, Bhaiṇiā, Bhaiṇī, Bhāmiṇī.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Bhagini in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Bhaginī (भगिनी):—(nf) a sister; ~[pati] brother-in-law, sister’s husband.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Bhagini (ಭಗಿನಿ):—[noun] a woman or girl as she is related to the other children of her parents; a sister.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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