Barada, Bārada: 4 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Barada means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Barada (बरद).—A tribe to be conquered by Kalki.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 73. 108.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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India history and geography

Source: Wisdom Library: India History

Barada refers to one of the thirty-six Rajput clans, according to Padmanabha’s 15th-century Kanhadadeprabandha, in which he described the Muslim invasion of Gujarat of 1298 AD. The kingdom or dynasty of the Baradas had their own princes and nobles and were further separated into sub-clans and families. Their name can also be spelled as Bārada.

The Rajputs are a Hindu race claiming to be descendants of the ancient Kṣatriya-varṇa (warrior caste). Originally, the Rajputs consisted of two principal branches: the Sūryavaṃśa (solar race) and the Candravaṃśa (lunar race), to which later was added the Agnivaṃśa (fire-born race).

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

baraḍa (बरड).—m An insect infesting grain, wood &c. Pr. turī barōbara ba0 ciraḍalā jātō. 2 f C Rice-ground left, after yielding a crop of plantlets, to rest for the next year.

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baraḍa (बरड).—a baraḍakharaḍa a (baraḍa by redup.) Consisting of murūma, pebble, gravel, and poor red earth--soil or ground. 2 fig. Pock-pitted--a face.

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baraḍā (बरडा).—m baraḍī supārī f Betelnut gathered in its middle stage of ripeness, and prepared by boiling and drying.

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baraḍā (बरडा).—m Poor or meagre ground; reddish soil with pebbles, gravel, or murūma.

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baraḍā (बरडा).—a Poor, lean, meagre, dry, consisting of baraḍā q. v. supra.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

baraḍa (बरड).—m An insect infesting grain, wood &c. Pr. turī barōbara baraḍa ciraḍalā jātō.

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baraḍā (बरडा).—m baraḍī supārī f Betelnut gathered in its middle stage of ripeness, and prepared by boiling and drying.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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