Bankapura, Vaṅkāpura, Vankapura, Vanka-pura, Baṅkāpura, Banka-pura: 3 definitions

Introduction:

Bankapura means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Bankapura in Shaktism glossary
Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

1) Vaṅkāpura (वङ्कापुर) refers to one of the Sixteen Siddhas according to the Kubjikānityāhnikatilaka: a derative text drawing from Tantras and other sources such as the Ṣaṭsāhasrasaṃhitā.—These sixteen spiritual teachers represent the disciples of the Nine Nāthas who propagated the Western Transmission noted in the Kubjikā Tantras. According to the lunar symbolism of the Kulakaulinīmata, these these sixteen teachers are the rays of the moon. According to the Ambāmatasaṃhitā, the sixteen great Siddhas [e.g., Vaṅkāpura] have authority in Koṃkaṇa; and it is further stated that the Kaulika (tradition) with sixteen lineages originated in the Deccan (dakṣiṇāpatha).

Vaṅkāpura is the Caryā name of this Nātha (i.e., the public name the Siddha uses when living as a wandering renouncer). Vaṅkāpura is further associated with the following: (1) Birth place: Jājanagara in Gauḍa (alternatively, Makuṭa); (2) Caste: Brahmin (alternatively, Śūdra); (3) Name at birth: Carpaṭa (alternatively, his birth-name is Rājadeva and his father is Viśvarūpa); (4) Prasiddha or famed name: Ketakīdeva; (5) Gopya or secret name: Marmānanda (or Manonmana); (6) Prapūjya or worship-name: Khaḍgānanda (or Brahmānanda, Brāhmārpaṇa, Srotrānanda); (7) Consorts: Khaḍgāmbā and Mohinyā (or Divyāmbā, Mohanyambā).

2) Vaṃkāpura (वंकापुर) is defined as the birth-place of Prayāsadeva—one of the Sixteen Siddhas according to the Kubjikānityāhnikatilaka: a derative text drawing from Tantras and other sources such as the Ṣaṭsāhasrasaṃhitā.—Prayāsadeva is the Caryā name of this Nātha (i.e., the public name the Siddha uses when living as a wandering renouncer). He is associated withe with the birth-place known as Ḍāhala (alternatively, Vaṃkāpura).

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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India history and geography

Source: Wikipedia: India History

Bankapura or Bankapur is a panchayat town in Haveri district in the state of Karnataka, India. The Kadambas of Bankapur served as regional governors for Kadambas of Banavasi and then Kadambas of Hangal. During the 9th century, Bankapura was named after Bankeyarasa (in 898 CE) who was a feudatory of Rashtrakuta king Amoghavarsha I. Bankapura place is of historical significance to Jains. Adipuran, a Jain religious text was composed here.

Source: Jainworld: Jain History (h)

Baṅkāpura (बङ्कापुर) is a great Jaina Tīrtha of Dharwar District, became a Jaina centre from the ninth century A.D., as it is learnt from the Praśasti of Guṇabhadra’s Uttarapurāṇa. It was founded by Baṅkeyarasa, a sāmanta of the Rāṣṭrakūṭa Amoghavarṣa I, who ruled in the ninth century A.D. Jaina inscriptions of later times also have been discovered from this place. Even in the seventeenth century, it was considered a flourishing Jaina Tīrtha by Śilāvijaya who visited the Jaina Tīrthas of South India in the second half of that century.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as mythology, zoology, royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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