Bananja, Baṇañja: 1 definition

Introduction

Introduction:

Bananja means something in the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

India history and geogprahy

Source: What is India: Inscriptions of the Śilāhāras

Baṇañja or Vīra-Baṇañja refers to the name of a trading corporation mentioned in the “Kolhāpur stone inscription of Gaṇḍarāditya”. Among those who agreed to levy the dues and taxes on the articles manufactured and sold (in Kavaḍegolla) the most noted was the Trading Corporation of Ayyavole, also called Ahicchatra, which was known as Vīra-Baṇañjas (the Heroic Traders). The present inscription contains a lengthy praśasti of the Corporation. It is said to have consisted of the five- hundred svāmīs, who were probably the original founders of the Corporation, and the gavares, the gātriyas, the seṭṭis, the seṭṭi-guttas, the gāmaṇḍas and the chief gāmaṇḍas.

This stone inscription (mentioning Vīra-Baṇañja) is on the right side of the temple of the Jaina Tīrthaṅkara Pārśvanātha near the former Śukravāra gate of Kolhāpur. It records certain taxes and dues levied by the Trading Corporation of the Vīra-Baṇañjas and certain merchants and representatives of towns. It is dated on the fifth tithi of the dark fortnight of Kārttika in the Śaka year 1058, the cyclic year being Rākṣasa.

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context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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