Balada, Bala-da, Bālāda: 10 definitions

Introduction

Balada means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Balada (बलद).—The first son of the Agni, Bhānu. It is this Agni which gives life and strength to all living beings. (Śloka 10, Chapter 221, Śānti Parva, Mahābhārata).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Bālāda (बालाद).—A class of Piśācas short in stature and with eyes facing the earth and who resort to places of confinement of women.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 7. 380 and 398; Vāyu-purāṇa 69. 277.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: WorldCat: Rāj nighaṇṭu

Baladā (बलदा) is another name for Aśvagandhā, a medicinal plant identified with Withania somnifera Dunal. (“Indian ginseng” or “Winter Cherry”) from the Solanaceae or Nightshade family of flowering plants, according to verse 4.109-112 of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu. The fourth chapter (śatāhvādi-varga) of this book enumerates eighty varieties of small plants (pṛthu-kṣupa). Together with the names Baladā and Aśvagandhā, there are a total of twenty-two Sanskrit synonyms identified for this plant.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

balada : (adj.) strength-giving; bestowal of power.

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

baḷada (बळद).—n baḷata n R Void space preserved along the interior of a wall to contain grain. The grain is poured in from above, and taken out through a hole at the bottom: also a crypt or secret cavity in the floor to hold things. 2 A corner of a room, or other space, walled off to hold lumber.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

baḷada (बळद).—n baḷata n Void space preserved along the interior of a wall to con- tain grain.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Balada (बलद).—an ox, a bullock

Derivable forms: baladaḥ (बलदः).

Balada is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms bala and da (द).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Balada (बलद).—m.

(-daḥ) An ox. E. bala, da who gives.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Balada (बलद).—[masculine] ox.

--- OR ---

Baladā (बलदा).—[adjective] giving strength.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Balada (बलद):—[=bala-da] [from bala > bal] m. ‘strength-giving’, a [particular] form of Agni, [Gṛhyāsaṃgraha; Mahābhārata]

2) [v.s. ...] an ox, bullock, [Kathāsaritsāgara] (dī-bhūta mfn. become an ox, [ib.])

3) [v.s. ...] a [particular] medicinal plant (= jīvaka), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) Baladā (बलदा):—[=bala-dā] [from bala-da > bala > bal] a f. Physalis Flexuosa, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) [v.s. ...] Name of a daughter of Raudrāśva, [Harivaṃśa] ([varia lectio] balā).

6) [=bala-dā] [from bala > bal] b ([Ṛg-veda; Kauśika-sūtra]) mfn. conferring or imparting power.

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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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