Bahula, Bahulā, Bāhula: 20 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Bahula means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

Bahula (बहुल) is the Sanskrit name of one of Bharata’s sons, mentioned in the Nāṭyaśāstra 1.26-33. After Brahmā created the Nāṭyaveda (nāṭyaśāstra), he ordered Bharata to teach the science to his (one hundred) sons. Bharata thus learned the Nāṭyaveda from Brahmā, and then made his sons study and learn its proper application. After their study, Bharata assigned his sons (eg., Bahula) various roles suitable to them.

Natyashastra book cover
context information

Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: Wisdom Library: Varāha-purāṇa

1) Bahulā (बहुला).—Name of a river (nadī) situated near the seven great mountains on the western side of mount Naiṣadha, according to the Varāhapurāṇa chapter 83. These settlements consume the water flowing from these seven great mountains (Viśākha, Kambala, Jayanta, Kṛṣṇa, Harita, Aśoka and Vardhamāna). Niṣadha (Naiṣadha) is one of the seven mountains located in Jambūdvīpa, ruled over by Āgnīdhra, a grandson of Svāyambhuva Manu.

2) Bahulā (बहुला) is another name for Puṇḍarīka, one of the seven major rivers situated in Krauñcadvīpa, according to the Varāhapurāṇa chapter 88. Krauñcadvīpa is one of the seven islands (dvīpa), ruled over by Jyotiṣmān, one of the ten sons of Priyavrata, son of Svāyambhuva Manu.

Svāyambhuva Manu was created by Brahmā, who was in turn created by Nārāyaṇa, the unknowable all-pervasive primordial being.

The Varāhapurāṇa is categorised as a Mahāpurāṇa, and was originally composed of 24,000 metrical verses, possibly originating from before the 10th century. It is composed of two parts and Sūta is the main narrator.

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

1) Bahulā (बहुला).—A river. In Mahābhārata, Bhīṣma Parva, Chapter 9, Stanza 29, mention is made about this river which is famous in the Purāṇas.

2) Bahulā (बहुला).—An attendant of Subrahmaṇya. (Mahābhārata, Śalya Parva, Chapter 46, Stanza 3).

3) Bahulā (बहुला).—Wife of Vidura a Brahmin, who frequented the houses of harlots. Bahulā was in the habit of going to the temple of Gokarṇa and hear Purāṇas, after the death of her husband. By this good deed Vidura got deliverance from sin. (Skanda Purāṇa 3.3.22).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1a) Bahula (बहुल).—A Prajāpati.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 1. 54; Vāyu-purāṇa 65. 54.

1b) A thousand-hooded snake.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 6. 41.
Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Bahula (बहुल) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. V.72.13) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Bahula) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Bahulā also refers to the name of a Lady mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. IX.45.3).

Bahulā also refers to the name of a River mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. VI.10.26).

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Vyakarana (Sanskrit grammar)

Source: Wikisource: A dictionary of Sanskrit grammar

Bahula (बहुल).—lit. variously applicable; the word is used in the rules of Panini in connection with a grammatical rule or affix or the like that is seen necessarily applied in some cases, optionally applied in a few other cases and not at all applied in the other cases still. The word बहुलम् (bahulam) is used by Panini in all such cases. See P. II. 1.32, 57; II. 3.62; II.4.39, 73, 76, 84, III. 1.34 etc.; cf. the usual explanation of बहुलम् (bahulam) given by grammarians in the lines क्वचित्प्रवृत्तिः क्वचिदप्रवृत्तिः क्वचिद्विभाषा क्वचि-दन्यदेव । विधेर्विधानं बहुधा समीक्ष्य चतुर्विधं बाहुलकं वदन्ति (kvacitpravṛttiḥ kvacidapravṛttiḥ kvacidvibhāṣā kvaci-danyadeva | vidhervidhānaṃ bahudhā samīkṣya caturvidhaṃ bāhulakaṃ vadanti) Com. V. Pr. III.18.

context information

Vyakarana (व्याकरण, vyākaraṇa) refers to Sanskrit grammar and represents one of the six additional sciences (vedanga) to be studied along with the Vedas. Vyakarana concerns itself with the rules of Sanskrit grammar and linguistic analysis in order to establish the correct context of words and sentences.

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Kavya (poetry)

Source: archive.org: Naisadhacarita of Sriharsa

Bahula (बहुल) refers to the “dark half of a month”, and is mentioned in the Naiṣadha-carita 4.63; 21.124.

context information

Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Tibetan Buddhism

Bahulā (बहुला) is the name of a Piśācī mentioned as attending the teachings in the 6th century Mañjuśrīmūlakalpa: one of the largest Kriyā Tantras devoted to Mañjuśrī (the Bodhisattva of wisdom) representing an encyclopedia of knowledge primarily concerned with ritualistic elements in Buddhism. The teachings in this text originate from Mañjuśrī and were taught to and by Buddha Śākyamuni in the presence of a large audience (including Bahulā).

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

bahula : (adj.) abundant; frequent.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

1) Bahula, (nt.) (=preceding) N. of a lucky die J. VI, 281. (Page 485)

2) Bahula, (adj.) (usually —°, as °- only in cpd. °ājīva) much, abundant, nt. abundance (°-); full of, rich in, fig. given to, intent on, devoted to D. II, 73; S. I, 199, 202; A. III, 86 (pariyatti°), 432 (āloka°); IV, 35; It. 27, 30; J. IV, 5 (vināsa°), 22; PvA. 80 (chārik’ aṅgāra°).—sayana° as much as “particular in one’s choice of resting place” Miln. 365 nt. bahulaṃ (-°) in the fullness of, full of S. III, 40 (nibbidā°). The compn form with karoti (& kamma) is bahulī° (q. v.). Cp. bāhulla.—ājīva living in abundance (opp. Lūkh’ājīvin) D. III, 44, 47. (Page 485)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

bahula (बहुल).—m S The dark half of a month.

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bahula (बहुल).—a (Poetry.) Many or much.

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bāhulā (बाहुला).—m A representation (of a man or other male) made of cloth, wood, earth, stone &c.; a figure or image, a doll, puppet, statue. 2 unc The arm &c. See bāhuṭā. 3 (See bāhēlā) Cow-rope &c.

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bāhuḷā (बाहुळा).—m R (Commonly bāvhaḷā) The region of the shoulder-joint.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

bahula (बहुल).—m The dark half of a month.

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bahula (बहुल).—a Many or much.

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bāhulā (बाहुला).—m n A doll, puppet. A figure, image, statue.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Bahula (बहुल).—a. (compar. baṃhīyas superl. baṃhiṣṭha)

1) Thick, dense, compact; वृक्षांश्च बहुलच्छायान् ददृशुर्गिरिमूर्धनि (vṛkṣāṃśca bahulacchāyān dadṛśurgirimūrdhani) Mb.3. 143.3.

2) (a) Broad, wide, capacious; (b) ample, large.

3) Abundant, copious, plentiful, much, numerous; अविनयबहुलतया (avinayabahulatayā) K.143.

4) Numerous, manifold, many; तरुणतमालनीलबहुलोन्नमदम्बुधराः (taruṇatamālanīlabahulonnamadambudharāḥ) Māl.9.18.

5) Full of, rich or abounding in; जन्मनि क्लेशबहुले किं नु दुःखमतः परम् (janmani kleśabahule kiṃ nu duḥkhamataḥ param) H.1.184; क्रियाविशेषबहुलां भोगैश्वर्यगतिं प्रति (kriyāviśeṣabahulāṃ bhogaiśvaryagatiṃ prati) Bg.2.43.

6) Accompanied or attended by.

7) Born under the Pleiades; P.IV.3.33.

8) Dark, black.

9) Comprehensive, variously applicable.

-laḥ 1 The dark half of a month (kṛṣṇapakṣa); प्रादुरास बहुलक्षपाछबिः (prādurāsa bahulakṣapāchabiḥ) R.11.15; करेण भानोर्बहुलावसाने संधुक्ष्यमाणेव शशाङ्करेखा (kareṇa bhānorbahulāvasāne saṃdhukṣyamāṇeva śaśāṅkarekhā) Ku.7.8;4.13.

2) An epithet of fire.

-lā 1 A cow; कस्मात् समाने बहुलाप्रदाने सद्भिः प्रशस्तं कपिलाप्रदानम् (kasmāt samāne bahulāpradāne sadbhiḥ praśastaṃ kapilāpradānam) Mb.13.77.9.

2) Cardamoms.

3) The indigo plant.

4) The Pleiades (pl.)

-lam 1 The sky.

2) White-pepper.

-lam ind. Often, frequently; बहुलं छन्दसि (bahulaṃ chandasi).

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Bāhula (बाहुल).—a. Manifold.

-laḥ Fire; शीतरुजं समये च परस्मिन् बाहुलतो रसिका शमयन्ती (śītarujaṃ samaye ca parasmin bāhulato rasikā śamayantī) Rām. Ch.4.99.

2) The month Kārtika.

-lam 1 Manifoldness.

2) An armour for the arms, vantbrass.

-lī The day of full moon in the month of Kārtika.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Bahula (बहुल).—nt., a high number, = 100 utsaṅga (Mahāvyutpatti ucchaṅga): Lalitavistara 148.2, cited Mahāvyutpatti 7962 = Tibetan maṅ ḥdzin, much hold.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Bahula (बहुल).—mfn.

(-laḥ-lā-laṃ) 1. Much, many, 2. Black. 3. Variously applicable, comprehensive, (a rule, &c.) m.

(-laḥ) 1. Agni or fire. 2. The dark half of a month. n.

(-laṃ) The sky. f. plu.

(-lāḥ). The Pleiades. f.

(-lā) 1. Indigo. 2. Cardamoms. 3. A cow. E. bahu many, to get, aff. ka .

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Bāhula (बाहुल).—m.

(-laḥ) 1. Fire or its deity. 2. The month Kartika. n.

(-laṃ) 1. Mail worn on the arm. 2. A term in grammar, implying various or irregular formation, or construction or such as is analogous to this word. E. bahula fire, and aṇ aff.; also with kan added, bāhulaka .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Bahula (बहुल).—[bahu + la], I. adj., f. , comparat. baṃhīyaṃs, superl. baṃhiṣṭha. 1. Manifold. 2. Much, [Bhartṛhari, (ed. Bohlen.)] 2, 29; numerous, [Pañcatantra] ii. [distich] 8; abundant, [Uttara Rāmacarita, 2. ed. Calc., 1862.] 24, 13; exceeding, ib. 69, 2 (thus to be read). 3. Abounding in, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 4, 60; [Hitopadeśa] i. [distich] 183, M.M.; Chr. 47, 41. 4. Variously applicable (a rule). 5. Black, [Raghuvaṃśa, (ed. Stenzler.)] 11, 15. Ii. m. 1. Agni. 2. The dark half of a month. Iii. f. , pl. The Pleiades. Iv. n. The sky.

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Bāhula (बाहुल).—I. i. e. bahula + a, m. 1. Fire. 2. The month Kārttika. Ii. i. e. bāhu + la, n. Mail worn on the arms.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Bahula (बहुल).—[adjective] thick, dense, wide, large, numerous, many, much, abounding in (—°); [neuter] [adverb] often. Abstr. † [feminine], tva† [neuter]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Bahula (बहुल):—[from bah] mf(ā)n. thick, dense, broad, wide, spacious, ample, large, [Ṛg-veda] etc. etc.

2) [v.s. ...] abundant, numerous, many, much, [ib.] (am ind. often, frequently, [Nirukta, by Yāska; Prātiśākhya; Pāṇini])

3) [v.s. ...] accompanied by, attended with, [Chāndogya-upaniṣad; Manu-smṛti; Mahābhārata] etc.

4) [v.s. ...] (in gram.) variously applicable, comprehensive (as a rule)

5) [v.s. ...] born under the Pleiades, [Pāṇini 4-3, 33]

6) [v.s. ...] black, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

7) [v.s. ...] m. (or n. ?) the dark half of a month, [Mahābhārata; Kāvya literature] etc.

8) [v.s. ...] m. Agni or fire, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

9) [v.s. ...] Name of a Prajāpati, [Viṣṇu-purāṇa]

10) [v.s. ...] of a king of the Tāla-jaṅghas, [Mahābhārata]

11) [v.s. ...] m. [plural] Name of a people, [Mārkaṇḍeya-purāṇa]

12) Bahulā (बहुला):—[from bahula > bah] f. a cow, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

13) [v.s. ...] cardamoms, [Bhāvaprakāśa]

14) [v.s. ...] the indigo plant, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

15) [v.s. ...] Name of the twelfth Kalā of the moon, [Catalogue(s)]

16) [v.s. ...] of a goddess, [Purāṇa]

17) [v.s. ...] of one of the Mātṛs attending on Skanda, [Mahābhārata]

18) [v.s. ...] of the wife of Uttama who was son of Uttāna-pāda, [Mārkaṇḍeya-purāṇa]

19) [v.s. ...] of the mother of a Samudra, [Hemacandra’s Pariśiṣṭaparvan]

20) [v.s. ...] of a mythical cow, [Colebrooke]

21) [v.s. ...] of a river, [Mahābhārata]

22) [v.s. ...] f. [plural]= kṛttikās, the Pleiades, [Varāha-mihira; cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

23) Bahula (बहुल):—[from bah] n. the sky, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

24) [v.s. ...] factitious black salt, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

25) [v.s. ...] white pepper, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

26) [v.s. ...] a [particular] high number, [Buddhist literature]

27) Bāhula (बाहुल):—[from bāhu] 1. bāhula n. (for 2. See below) armour for the arms, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

28) [v.s. ...] Name of a place in Dakṣiṇā-patha, [Catalogue(s)]

29) [from bāhu] 2. bāhula mfn. ([from] bahula for 1. See above) manifold [gana] saṃkalādi

30) [v.s. ...] m. the month Kārttika (when the moon is near the Pleiades; See bahulā), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

31) [v.s. ...] fire, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

32) [v.s. ...] a Jina, [Demetrius Galanos’s Lexiko: sanskritikes, anglikes, hellenikes]

33) [v.s. ...] Name of a prince, [Viṣṇu-purāṇa]

34) [v.s. ...] n. manifoldness [gana] pṛthv-ādi

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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