Bahuka, Bāhuka, Bahukā, Bāhukā: 20 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Bahuka means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Vaishnavism (Vaishava dharma)

Source: VedaBase: Śrīmad Bhāgavatam

Vṛka's son was Bāhuka. The enemies of King Bāhuka took away all his possessions, and therefore the King entered the order of vānaprastha and went to the forest with his wife. Bāhuka died when he was old, and one of his wives wanted to die with him, following the satī rite. At that time, however, Aurva Muni, knowing her to be pregnant, forbade her to die. Knowing that she was pregnant, the co-wives of the wife of Bāhuka conspired to give her poison with her food, but it did not act. Instead, the son was born along with the poison. Therefore he became famous as Sagara (“one who is born with poison”). Sagara later became the emperor. The place known as Gaṅgāsāgara was excavated by his sons.

Vaishnavism book cover
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Vaishnava (वैष्णव, vaiṣṇava) or vaishnavism (vaiṣṇavism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshipping Vishnu as the supreme Lord. Similar to the Shaktism and Shaivism traditions, Vaishnavism also developed as an individual movement, famous for its exposition of the dashavatara (‘ten avatars of Vishnu’).

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: Wisdom Library: Bhagavata Purana

Bāhuka (बाहुक):—Son of Vṛka (son of Bharuka). He had a son named Sagara. (see Bhāgavata Purāṇa 9.8.2-4)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

1) Bāhuka (बाहुक).—A serpent born in the family of Kauravya. This snake fell in the sacrificial fire of Janamejaya and was burnt to death. (Mahābhārata, Ādi Parva, Chapter 57, Stanza 13).

2) Bāhuka (बाहुक).—The pseudo-name assumed by Nala when he was living in the palace of Ṛtuparṇa in disguise. For further information see the word Nala.

3) Bāhuka (बाहुक).—A mighty hero of the family of the Vṛṣṇis. About this Bāhuka, mention is made in Mahābhārata, Vana Parva, Chapter 129, Stanza 19.

Source: Archaeological Survey of India: Śaiva monuments at Paṭṭadakal (harivaṃśa)

Bāhuka (बाहुक).—According to the Harivaṃśa, Bāhuka, (also known as Asita in some texts), was the father of Sagara. In consequence of his leading a debauched life, Bāhuka lost his kingdom. He was in exile with his two spouses. Yādavī, his elder wife, was preparing to commit satī, when he breathed his last. But she was forbidden from her act by the sage Bhārgava because she was pregnant.

Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Bāhuka (बाहुक) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. I.52.12, I.57) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Bāhuka) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shilpashastra (iconography)

Source: Archaeological Survey of India: Śaiva monuments at Paṭṭadakal (śilpa)

Bāhuka (बाहुक) is depicted as a sculpture on the third pillar of the southern half of the maṇḍapa of the temple of Lokeśvara.—Probably, the story from the Viṣṇudharmottara is the source for the visualization of three sequences here, from left to right. A lady lying on a bed is feeding her baby. The baby is sucking her breast. By the side of her bed are sitting a man and his consort. We venture to think that it is Bāhuka who is holding the hand of his second wife to forbid her from doing some nasty act to the child. And the lady with the child is Yādavī.

The next scene is, about the two ladies after the death of their husband, Bāhuka. A lady in distress is sitting in a maṇḍapa, pavilion. Probably, she is the second wife. She looks quite desperate. With a child in her arms, Yādavī is sitting under a tree, with a cheerful face.

Shilpashastra book cover
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Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

Source: WikiPedia: Hinduism

Bahuka (बाहुक): The changed name of Nala, as a charioteer of Rituparna, the king of Ayodhya. Also other name of king Bahu.

In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names

A river to which sacrifices were offered (M.i.39; J.v.388f.). v.l. Bahuka.

context information

Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

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India history and geography

Source: Ancient Buddhist Texts: Geography of Early Buddhism

Bāhukā (बाहुका) and Bāhumatī are rivers situated in Majjhimadesa (Middle Country) of ancient India, as recorded in the Pāli Buddhist texts (detailing the geography of ancient India as it was known in to Early Buddhism).—In the Majjhima Nikāya we are told that while Bāhukā, Sundarikā, Sarasvatī and Bahumatī were rivers, Gayā and Payāga were tīrthas only, or ghats on the Ganges. Bāhukā may be the Bāhudā river of the Mahābhārata and Harivaṁśa, identical with the river Dhabala now called Dhumela or Burha Rāpti, a feeder of the Rāpti in Oudh. Pargiter, however, identifies it with Rāmagaṅga which joins the Ganges near the Kanoj.

Its [Bāhukā/Bāhumatī ?] junction with the rivers Maradārika, Manisrohi, Rājamañjari, Ratnāvalī, Chārumatī, Prabhāvatī, and Triveṇī form the tīrthas called Śānta, Śaṅkara, Rājamañjari, Pramodā, Sulakeshaṇa, Jayā and Gokarṇa respectively (cf., Svayambhū Purāṇa and Varāhapurāṇa).

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

bahuka : (adj.) many.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Bahuka, (adj.) (fr. bahu) great, much, many, abundant J. III, 368 (b. jano most people, the majority of p.); V, 388; IV, 536; Mhvs 36, 49; PvA. 25 (gloss for pahūta Pv. I, 52); DhA. II, 175.—nt. bahukaṃ plenty, abundance A. II, 7=Pug. 63; Vism. 403 (opp. thokaṃ). Compar. bahukataraṃ more J. II, 88 (v. l. bahutaraṃ). (Page 485)

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Bahuka (बहुक).—a. Dear bought.

-kaḥ 1 The sun.

2) The sunplant (arka).

3) A crab.

4) A kind of gallinule.

5) The digger of a tank.

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Bāhuka (बाहुक).—a.

1) Swimming with the arms.

2) Servile, dependent.

3) Dwarfish; ममन्थुरूरं तरसा तत्रासीद्बाहुको नरः (mamanthurūraṃ tarasā tatrāsīdbāhuko naraḥ) Bhāg.4.14.43.

-kaḥ 1 A monkey.

2) A name assumed by Nala after his transformation into a dwarf by Karkoṭaka.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Bahuka (बहुक).—adj. (= Pali id.; Sanskrit bahu plus ka svārthe, perhaps partly m.c.), much, pl. many: °kāḥ Saddharmapuṇḍarīka 95.10 (verse); as quasi-subst., bahukaṃ dinnaṃ Mahāvastu ii.67.16, 17 (prose), much was given.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Bahuka (बहुक).—m.

(-kaḥ) 1. A crab. 2. A gallinule. 3. A plant, (Asclepias gigantea.) 4. The digger of a tank, (jalakhātake.) E. bahu much, kan aff.

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Bāhuka (बाहुक).—mfn.

(-kaḥ-kā-kaṃ) A servant, servile, dependent. m.

(-kaḥ) 1. The name of Nala, after his change of form, by the bite of Karko- Taka Naga. 2. A monkey. f.

(-kā) The name of a river. E. bāhu an arm, kan aff.; or kṛ to do, with ḍa aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Bahuka (बहुक).—m. 1. A crab. 2. The digger of a tank.

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Bāhuka (बाहुक).—[bāhu + ka], I. adj. Servile, a servant. Ii. m. 1. A monkey. 2. also vāhuka vāhuka, The name of Nala after his change of form, [Nala] 15, 2.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Bāhuka (बाहुक).—(adj. —°) arm; [Name] of a serpent-demon etc.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Bahuka (बहुक):—[from bah] mf(ā)n. bought at a high price, dear-bought, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

2) [v.s. ...] m. Calotropis Gigantea, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) [v.s. ...] a crab, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) [v.s. ...] a kind of gallinule, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) [v.s. ...] the digger of a tank, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) Bāhuka (बाहुक):—[from bāhu] mfn. ifc. = bāhu1, the arm (cf. hrasvabāhuka)

7) [v.s. ...] mf(ā)n. servile, dependent, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

8) [v.s. ...] swimming with the arms, [Baudhāyana-dharma-śāstra] (cf. [Pāṇini 4-4, 7 [Scholiast or Commentator]])

9) [v.s. ...] dwarfish, [Bhāgavata-purāṇa]

10) [v.s. ...] m. a monkey, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

11) [v.s. ...] Name of a Nāga, [Mahābhārata]

12) [v.s. ...] of a prince, [ib.]

13) [v.s. ...] of a son of Vṛka (= bāhu), [Purāṇa]

14) [v.s. ...] (also written vāh) Name assumed by Nala upon his becoming charioteer to king Ṛtu-parṇa, [Nalopākhyāna]

15) Bāhukā (बाहुका):—[from bāhuka > bāhu] f. Name of a river, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Bahuka (बहुक):—(kaḥ) 1. m. A crab; a gallinule; asclepias plant; digger of a tank.

2) Bāhuka (बाहुक):—(kaḥ) 1. m. King Nala when a coachman; a rakshasa; a monkey. f. Name of a river. a. Servile, dependant; a servant.

[Sanskrit to German] (Deutsch Wörterbuch)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Böhtlingk and Roth Grosses Petersburger Wörterbuch

Bahuka (बहुक):—

1) adj. proparox. (von bahu) theuer gekauft Schol. zu [Pāṇini’s acht Bücher 5, 1, 22. fg. 1, 1, 23.] f. bahukā [Pāṇini’s acht Bücher 7, 3, 44,] [Scholiast] —

2) m. a) = arka [Hemacandra’s Anekārthasaṃgraha 3, 73. fg.] [Medinīkoṣa k. 128.] Calotropis gigantea [Wilson’s Wörterbuch] — b) Krebs. — c) eine Hühnerart (dātyūha) . — d) = jalakhādaka [Hemacandra’s Anekārthasaṃgraha] = jalakhātaka [Medinīkoṣa] the digger of a tank [WILSON.] — Die gedr. Ausg. der [Medinīkoṣa] hat bāhuka st. bahuka, [Śabdakalpadruma] und [WILSON] aber führen nach dieser Aut. bahuka auf.

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Bāhuka (बाहुक):—(von bāhu)

1) am Ende eines adj. comp.: hrasva kurzarmig [Nalopākhyāna 18, 6. 22, 1.] —

2) oxyt. adj. gaṇa ṛśyādi und varāhādi zu [Pāṇini’s acht Bücher 4, 2, 80.] dienstbar, abhängig [ŚABDĀRTHAK.] bei [WILSON.] —

3) proparox. adj. f. ā (mit den Armen) schwimmend [Pāṇini’s acht Bücher 4, 4, 7,] [Scholiast] —

4) adj. zwerghaft [Bhāgavatapurāṇa 4, 14, 43.] Diese Bed. hat sich wohl aus 6,c. entwickelt. —

5) m. Affe [ŚABDĀRTHAK.] bei [WILSON.] —

6) Nomen proprium a) eines Nāga [Mahābhārata 1, 2154.] — b) eines Fürsten [Mahābhārata 3, 10277.] eines Sohnes des Vṛka, also = bāhu [Viṣṇupurāṇa 373.] [Bhāgavatapurāṇa 9, 8, 2.] — c) der Name, den Nala nach seiner Verwandlung durch den Schlangendämon Karkoṭaka als Wagenlenker Ṛtuparṇa’s annahm, [Trikāṇḍaśeṣa 2, 8, 9.] [Nalopākhyāna 14, 20. 15, 2. 18, 5.] —

7) f. ā Nomen proprium eines Flusses [ŚABDĀRTHAK.] bei [WILSON.] — In [Medinīkoṣa k. 128] werden dem Worte bāhuka dieselben Bedeutungen zugetheilt, welche andere Autt. bahuka geben. Vgl. pra .

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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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