Bahirdha, Bahirdhā: 8 definitions

Introduction:

Bahirdha means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra

Bahirdhā (बहिर्धा) refers to “that which is on the outside”, according to Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra (chapter 31).—Accordingly, “[...] Then the yogin makes this reflection: ‘When I examined inwardly, I did not find the Ātman and [I wondered] if it was not on the outside (bahirdhā), but when I examined [things] on the outside, I did not find it either. I wonder if the Ātman is not a delusion (bhrānti). Now I must examine internally and externally simultaneously (yugapat). Examining internal and external are two distinct operations (bhinna); examining [internal and external] at the same time (ekakāla) and simultaneously (sārdha) are conjunct operations!’ But although he examines [internal and external] conjointly or separately, the Ātman is not found anywhere: the examination is therefore ended. [...]”.

Source: academia.edu: A Study and Translation of the Gaganagañjaparipṛcchā

Bahirdhā (बहिर्धा) refers to “external (thought)”, according to the Gaganagañjaparipṛcchā: the eighth chapter of the Mahāsaṃnipāta (a collection of Mahāyāna Buddhist Sūtras).—Accordingly, “How, son of good family, does the meditation (dhyāna) of the Bodhisattva become like open space? Son of good family, the meditation of the Bodhisattva becomes like the expanse of the sky when he is endowed with the four dharmas. [...] To wit, (1) even if his thought is still during in the meditative absorption, he does not make it as an object of particular reflection; (2) while turning back the thought from outside, the external thought (bahirdhā-citta) is still in activity, but he has no conception of it; (3) by the sameness of his own thoughts he enters into concentration on the universal sameness of the thoughts of all beings; (4) and that the sameness of the thoughts is the entering into concentration on the sameness of all dharmas being like an illusion”.

Mahayana book cover
context information

Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

Discover the meaning of bahirdha in the context of Mahayana from relevant books on Exotic India

General definition (in Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Dharma-samgraha

Bahirdhā (बहिर्धा) or bahirdhāśūnyatā refers to “external emptiness” one of the “twenty emptinesses” (śūnyatā) as defined in the Dharma-saṃgraha (section 41). The Dharma-samgraha (Dharmasangraha) is an extensive glossary of Buddhist technical terms in Sanskrit (e.g., bahirdhā). The work is attributed to Nagarjuna who lived around the 2nd century A.D.

Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Bahirdhā (बहिर्धा).—[adverb] & [preposition] ([with] [ablative]) outside, without, out of.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Bahirdhā (बहिर्धा):—[=bahir-dhā] [from bahir > bahis] ind. out, outward, outside of or away from ([ablative]), [Vājasaneyi-saṃhitā; Brāhmaṇa; Chāndogya-upaniṣad]

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Bahirdhā (बहिर्धा) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Bahiddhā.

[Sanskrit to German]

Bahirdha in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of bahirdha in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

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