Avyaya: 27 definitions

Introduction:

Avyaya means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Avyay.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Avyaya (अव्यय).—A serpent of the Dhṛtarāṣṭra family. This serpent fell in the sacrificial fire meant for serpents, prepared by Janamejaya. (Mahābhārata, Ādi Parva, Chapter 57, Stanza 16).

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Avyaya (अव्यय) refers to the “unwasting”, and is used to describe Śiva, according the Śivapurāṇa 2.2.15. Accordingly as Brahmā narrated to Nārada:—“[...] On arrival there, after paying respects to the lord [Śiva] with great excitement we lauded Him with various hymns with palms joined in reverence. The Devas said: [...] Obeisance to the liberator of the individual soul from the noose; to the bestower of salvation to the devotee, to the self-luminous, the eternal, the unwasting (avyaya), the incessant knowledge”.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1a) Avyaya (अव्यय).—A son of Bhṛgu, and a deva.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 1. 90; Matsya-purāṇa 195. 13.

1b) (paulastya)—a sage of the Raucya epoch.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa IV. 1. 102.

1c) An Ajitadeva.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 67. 34.

1d) A sage of the XIIIth epoch of Manu.*

  • * Viṣṇu-purāṇa III. 2. 40.
Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Avyaya (अव्यय) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. XIV.8.25, XIV.8) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Avyaya) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Vyakarana (Sanskrit grammar)

Source: Wikisource: A dictionary of Sanskrit grammar

Avyaya (अव्यय).—Indeclinable, lit. invariant, not undergoing a change. Pāṇini has used the word as a technical term and includes in it all such words as स्वर्, अन्तर्, प्रातर् (svar, antar, prātar) etc, or composite expressions like अव्ययीभावसमास (avyayībhāvasamāsa), or such taddhitānta words as do not take all case affixes as also kṛdanta words ending in म् (m) or ए, ऐ, ओ, औ (e, ai, o, au). He gives such words in a long list of Sutras P. I.1.37 to 41; cf. सदृशं त्रिषु लिङ्गेषु सर्वासु च विभ-क्तिषु । वचनेषु च सर्वेषु यन्न व्येति तदव्ययम् (sadṛśaṃ triṣu liṅgeṣu sarvāsu ca vibha-ktiṣu | vacaneṣu ca sarveṣu yanna vyeti tadavyayam) Kāś. on P.I.1.37.

context information

Vyakarana (व्याकरण, vyākaraṇa) refers to Sanskrit grammar and represents one of the six additional sciences (vedanga) to be studied along with the Vedas. Vyakarana concerns itself with the rules of Sanskrit grammar and linguistic analysis in order to establish the correct context of words and sentences.

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Vaishnavism (Vaishava dharma)

Source: Pure Bhakti: Bhagavad-gita (4th edition)

Avyaya (अव्यय) refers to “imperishable”. (cf. Glossary page from Śrīmad-Bhagavad-Gītā).

Vaishnavism book cover
context information

Vaishnava (वैष्णव, vaiṣṇava) or vaishnavism (vaiṣṇavism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshipping Vishnu as the supreme Lord. Similar to the Shaktism and Shaivism traditions, Vaishnavism also developed as an individual movement, famous for its exposition of the dashavatara (‘ten avatars of Vishnu’).

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: gurumukhi.ru: Ayurveda glossary of terms

Avyaya (अव्यय):—Not liable to change; Imperishable , undecaying, A synonym of Ātmā

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Avyaya (अव्यय) refers to one of the eight Bhairavas (bhairava-aṣṭaka) associated with Avyaktapīṭha (i.e., ‘the unmanifest seat’ representing the act of churning—manthāna), according to the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—[...] The eight Bhairavas (bhairavāṣṭaka): Nitya, Nāda, Aja, Kāraṇa, Avyaya, Sarvaga, Śāśvata, Sthāṇu.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra

Avyaya (अव्यय) refers to “immutable”, according to Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra (chapter 2).—Accordingly, “Even if all beings in heaven and on earth and all substances (dravya) are not created by time, nevertheless time is immutable (avyaya). That is why it truly exists. But as the Dharma ‘time’ is subtle (sūkṣma), it is invisible (adṛṣya) and unknowable (ajñeya). It is by its effects, flowers (puṣpa), fruits (phala), etc., that its existence may be known and its characteristics (lakṣaṇa) may be seen, such as the past year or present year, long ago or recently, slowly or quickly. Although time is not seen, it is possible to know its existence; for it is by seeing the effect (phala) that one knows the existence of the cause (hetu). That is why a Dharma ‘time’ exists, and as this Dharma ‘time’ is immutable (avyaya), it is eternal (nitya)”.

Mahayana book cover
context information

Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

Avyaya (अव्यय) refers to “deathless”, according to the Yaśastilaka Campū verse 2.215-216.—Accordingly, “The Self is by nature deathless (avyaya) and without any beginning, endowed with bliss and infinite power, and luminous and pure. The powerful flames of sinful Karma heat it, like mercury, after lodging it in the body. Under the intoxicating power of Karma, even a man of superior merit goes reeling down to unhappy births. Se [sic] let the wise, who know the cardinal difference between the body and the Self, strive for the bliss that is free from rebirth”.

General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

avyaya : (nt.) indeclinable particle; absence of loss.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Avyaya, (a + vyaya | absence of loss or change, safety D. I. 72 (Instr. °ena safely); Miln. 393 (as abbaya T.). (Page 86)

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

avyaya (अव्यय).—n (S a & vyaya Expenditure.) An indeclinable word; an adverb, conjunction, interjection &c.

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avyaya (अव्यय).—a S Imperishable, indestructible, incorruptible, unchangeable.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

avyaya (अव्यय).—n An indeclinable word. a Imperishable.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Avyaya (अव्यय).—a. [nāsti vyayo yasya]

1) (a) Not liable to change, imperishable, undecaying, immutable; वेदाविना- शिनं नित्यं य एनमजमव्ययम् (vedāvinā- śinaṃ nityaṃ ya enamajamavyayam) Bhagavadgītā (Bombay) 2.21; विनाशमव्ययस्यास्य न कश्चित्कर्तुमर्हति (vināśamavyayasyāsya na kaścitkartumarhati) Bhagavadgītā (Bombay) 2.17,4.1,6,13;7.24-25;15.5,17. Ms. 1.18,19,57;2.81; R.8.24. (b) Eternal, everlasting, अश्वत्थं प्राहुरव्ययम् (aśvatthaṃ prāhuravyayam) Bhagavadgītā (Bombay) 15.1; अकीर्तिं कथयिष्यन्ति तेऽव्ययाम् (akīrtiṃ kathayiṣyanti te'vyayām) Bhagavadgītā (Bombay) 2.24.

2) Unexpended, unwasted.

3) Economical.

4) Giving imperishable fruit.

-yaḥ 1 Name of Viṣṇu.

2) Name of Śiva.

-yam 1 (In the Vedānta) A member or corporeal part of an organized body.

2) Brahmā.

3) (In gram.) An indeclinable particle &c; सदृशं त्रिषु लिङ्गेषु सर्वासु च विभक्तिषु । वचनेषु च सर्वेषु यन्न व्येति तदव्ययम् (sadṛśaṃ triṣu liṅgeṣu sarvāsu ca vibhaktiṣu | vacaneṣu ca sarveṣu yanna vyeti tadavyayam) ||

4) welfare; युधिष्ठिरमथापृच्छत्सर्वांश्च सुहृदोऽव्ययम् (yudhiṣṭhiramathāpṛcchatsarvāṃśca suhṛdo'vyayam) Bhāgavata 1. 3.1.

5) Prosperity; कुशलं चाव्ययं चैव पर्यपृच्छन्नरधिपम् (kuśalaṃ cāvyayaṃ caiva paryapṛcchannaradhipam) Rām.1.18.45.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Avyaya (अव्यय).—mfn.

(-yaḥ-yā-yaṃ) 1. Economical, parsimonious. 2. Unexpended, unwasted. 3. Imperishable, immutable, eternal. m.

(-yaḥ) A name of Vishnu. mn.

(-yaḥ-yaṃ) An indeclinable word, a particle. E. a neg. and vyaya expenditure.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Avyaya (अव्यय).—adj. 1. immutable, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 1, 19. 2. eternal, [Johnson's Selections from the Mahābhārata.] 23, 118; [Rājataraṅgiṇī] 5, 37.

Avyaya is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms a and vyaya (व्यय).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Avyaya (अव्यय).—1. [masculine] non-expense.

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Avyaya (अव्यय).—2. [adjective] imperishable, immutable. [neuter] an indeclinable word.

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Avyaya (अव्यय).—3. (avyaya) [adjective] = avya.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Aufrecht Catalogus Catalogorum

Avyaya (अव्यय) as mentioned in Aufrecht’s Catalogus Catalogorum:—[grammatical] L. 2523.
—by Rāmakṛṣṇa Bhaṭṭa. B. 3, 2.
—by Śākaṭāyana. Bühler 544.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Avyaya (अव्यय):—1. avyaya mfn. or rarely avyaya ([only [Ṛg-veda viii, 97, 2 and ix, 86, 34]]) (avi) made of sheep’s skin (as the woollen Soma strainer), [Ṛg-veda]

2) belonging to or consisting of sheep, [Ṛg-veda viii, 97, 2.]

3) [=a-vyaya] 2. a-vyaya mf(ā)n. not liable to change, imperishable, undecaying, [Upaniṣad; Manu-smṛti] etc.

4) [v.s. ...] ‘not spending’, parsimonious

5) [v.s. ...] m. Name of Viṣṇu or Śiva, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) [v.s. ...] of a son of Manu Raivata, [Harivaṃśa 433]

7) [v.s. ...] of a Nāga demon, [Mahābhārata i, 2157] ([edition] [Bombay edition])

8) [v.s. ...] the non-spending, parsimony

9) [v.s. ...] n. ([or m., [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]]) an indeclinable word, particle, [Pāṇini; Atharvaveda-prātiśākhya] etc.

10) [v.s. ...] n. (in Vedānta) a member or corporeal part of an organized body, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Avyaya (अव्यय):—[a-vyaya] (yaḥ-yaṃ) 1. m. n. An indeclinable word. m. Vishnu. a. Economical; imperishable.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Avyaya (अव्यय) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Avyaya, Avvaya.

[Sanskrit to German]

Avyaya in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Avyaya (अव्यय) [Also spelled avyay]:—(nm) an indeclinable (generally used in grammatical context).

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

Avyaya (अव्यय) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Avyaya.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Avyaya (ಅವ್ಯಯ):—[adjective] not subject to decay, destruction or change; immutable; imperishable.

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Avyaya (ಅವ್ಯಯ):—

1) [noun] (gram.) an indeclinable particle i.e. a) a short, usually uninflected and invariable part of speech used to express a syntactic or semantic relationship, as an article or any of certain prepositions, conjunctions or interjections b) a prefix or derivational suffix.

2) [noun] (phil.) a permanent state or condition; the state of becoming one with the Supreme; the final beatitude.

3) [noun] (phil.) the immutable Supreme.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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