Avatarita, Avatārita: 7 definitions

Introduction:

Avatarita means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Avatrit.

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Avatarita in Shaktism glossary
Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Avatārita (अवतारित) refers to “(knowledge) brought down (to earth)”, according to the second recension of the Yogakhaṇḍa of the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, as the Goddess said to Bhairava: “By virtue of (your intense) desire to achieve (this) in (our) friendship, I have given (you) the accomplishment of the Command. [...] Generate the fame (which is the energy called the) Nameless (Anāmā) and authority in the six sacred seats. O Siddhanātha, along with me, you are the leader in the Kula liturgy. Now you will possess knowledge that has not been seen or heard (by the senses). It is the knowledge announced in the past and brought down (to earth) by Ādinātha [i.e., avatāritaādināthāvatārita]. [...]”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Avatarita in Sanskrit glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Avatārita (अवतारित).—mfn.

(-taḥ-tā-taṃ) 1. Taken off or out, laid down or aside. 2. Descended. E. ava and tṝ causal form, kta aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Avatārita (अवतारित):—[=ava-tārita] [from ava-tṝ] mfn. caused to descend, fetched down from ([ablative])

2) [v.s. ...] taken down, laid down or aside

3) [v.s. ...] removed

4) [v.s. ...] set a-going, rendered current, accomplished, [Rājataraṅgiṇī]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Avatārita (अवतारित):—[ava-tārita] (taḥ-tā-taṃ) p. Taken off.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Avatārita (अवतारित) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Oāria.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Avatarita in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Avatarita (अवतरित) [Also spelled avatrit]:—(a) descended; become incarnate; quoted.

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Kannada-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Avatarita in Kannada glossary
Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Avatārita (ಅವತಾರಿತ):—[noun] that is descended; lowered from a higher position.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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