Atisha, Atiśa: 6 definitions

Introduction

Atisha means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Atiśa can be transliterated into English as Atisa or Atisha, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Buddhism

General definition (in Buddhism)

Source: WikiPedia: Buddhism

Atiśa Dīpaṃkara Śrījñāna (980–1054 CE) was a Buddhist teacher from the Pala Empire of Bengal. He was one of the major figures in the spread of 11th-century Mahayana and Vajrayana Buddhism in Asia and inspired Buddhist thought from Tibet to Sumatra. Revered as one of the great figures of classical Buddhism, Atisa was a key figure in the establishment of the Sarma schools of Tibetan Buddhism.

According to Tibetan sources, Atiśa was ordained into the Mahasamghika lineage at the age of twenty-eight by the Abbot Śīlarakṣita and studied almost all Buddhist and non-Buddhist schools of his time, including teachings from Vishnu, Shiva, Tantric Hinduism and other beliefs. He also studied the sixty-four kinds of art, the art of music and the art of logic and accomplished these studies until the age of twenty-two.

Source: Buddhism Tourism: Glossary of Buddhist Terms

A Bengali Buddhist Scholar who contributed immensely to the growth of Buddhism in tibet.

Source: academia.edu: The Chronological History of Buddhism

Atisa Dipankara Srijnana (321-393 CE) According to Taranatha, Atisa Dipankara Srijnana was the contemporary of Kings Bheyapala? and Nayapala (360-400 CE). He became the head of Odantapuri Vihara and Vikramasila Vihara. He preached Budddhism in Suvarnabhumi (Thailand, Malaysia, Cambodia and Indonesia). He stayed 12 years in Sumatra. He was the key figure in establishment of Tibetan Buddhism. He revived Vajrayana in Tibet.

India history and geogprahy

Source: academia.edu: The Chronological History of Tibetan Buddhism

Atisa Dipankara Srijnana (321-393 CE).—According to Taranatha, Atisa Dipankara Srijnana was the contemporary of Pala Kings Bheyapala? and Nayapala (360-400 CE). He became the head of Odantapuri Vihara and Vikramasila Vihara. He preached Budddhism in Suvarnabhumi (Thailand, Malaysia, Cambodia and Indonesia). He stayed 12 years in Sumatra. Atisa was the key figure in establishment of Tibetan Buddhism. He revived Vajrayana in Tibet. According to the Blue Annals, Yeshe-O, the monk king of the Guge kingdom of western Tibet sent his followers to learn and translate some of the Sanskrit Buddhist texts.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Atiśā (अतिशा).—strike at.

Atiśā is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms ati and śā (शा).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Atīśa (अतीश):—m. Name of a learned Buddhist (the re-founder of Lāmism), [Monier-Williams’ Buddhism 273].

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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See also (Relevant definitions)

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