Asrij, Asṛj, Aśrin, Ashrin: 18 definitions

Introduction:

Asrij means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit terms Asṛj and Aśrin can be transliterated into English as Asrj or Asrij or Asrin or Ashrin, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Toxicology (Study and Treatment of poison)

Source: Shodhganga: Kasyapa Samhita—Text on Visha Chikitsa

Asṛj (असृज्) or Asṛṅmaṇḍalī refers to one of the sixteen varieties of Maṇḍalī snakes, according to the Kāśyapa Saṃhitā: an ancient Sanskrit text from the Pāñcarātra tradition dealing with both Tantra and Viṣacikitsā—an important topic from Āyurveda which deals with the study of Toxicology (Viṣavidyā or Sarpavidyā).—Kāśyapa sources his antidotes from a multitude plants, a few minerals, salts and animal products available in nature. All these plants fall under various groups called gaṇas, as pronounced by the Ayurvedic Nigaṇṭus.

Unclassified Ayurveda definitions

Source: archive.org: Vagbhata’s Ashtanga Hridaya Samhita (first 5 chapters)

Asṛj (असृज्) refers to “blood”, as mentioned in verse 5.26 of the Aṣṭāṅgahṛdayasaṃhitā (Sūtrasthāna) by Vāgbhaṭa.—Accordingly, “[...] among the (different kinds of milk [viz., payas]), [...] Human milk [viz., mānuṣa] (is) destructive of eye-diseases (coming) of wind, choler, blood [viz., asṛj], and injury, (and that) in the form of refreshments and instillations (as well as) sternutatories”.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Asṛj (असृज्) refers to “blood”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.15 (“The penance and reign of Tārakāsura”).—Accordingly, as Brahmā narrated: “[...] At the same time, several phenomena of evil portent forboding misery and distress happened, when the son of Varāṅgī was born making the gods miserable. [...] Beasts in sheds and forests roamed here and there in great fright as though beaten and driven about, passing urine and shitting dungs as they pleased. Frightened cows sprayed blood [i.e., asṛj-doha] through their udders; their eyes brimmed with tears, clouds showering putrid matter became terrifying. [...]”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

Source: Wisdom Library: Brihat Samhita by Varahamihira

Asṛj (असृज्) refers to “blood” [?], according to the Bṛhatsaṃhitā (chapter 15) (“On the nakṣatras—‘asterisms’”), an encyclopedic Sanskrit work written by Varāhamihira mainly focusing on the science of ancient Indian astronomy astronomy (Jyotiṣa).—Accordingly, “Those who are born on the lunar day of Bharaṇī will deal in precious stones, will be flesh eaters (asṛj-piśita), will be wicked men; will delight in acts of killing and torture; will be dealers in pod grains; will be of low descent or weak-minded. [...]”.

Jyotisha book cover
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Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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Sports, Arts and Entertainment (wordly enjoyments)

Source: archive.org: Syainika Sastra of Rudradeva with English Translation (art)

Asṛj (असृज्) refers to “(human) blood” (used in the treatment of Hawks), according to the Śyainika-śāstra: a Sanskrit treatise dealing with the divisions and benefits of Hunting and Hawking, written by Rājā Rudradeva (or Candradeva) in possibly the 13th century.—Accordingly, [while discussing the treatment of hawks]: “[...] If the disease is caused by a general wasting of the system, it is said to he difficult to cure. Still some medicine is suggested. For, if the run of life is not already at its end, curative processes well-applied (suyojita) may become efficacious. The proper thing to do is to administer the meat of Kalaviṅka steeped in human blood (nara-asṛk-sikta), [...]”.

Arts book cover
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This section covers the skills and profiencies of the Kalas (“performing arts”) and Shastras (“sciences”) involving ancient Indian traditions of sports, games, arts, entertainment, love-making and other means of wordly enjoyments. Traditionally these topics were dealt with in Sanskrit treatises explaing the philosophy and the justification of enjoying the pleasures of the senses.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

Asṛj (असृज्) refers to “blood”, according to the 11th century Jñānārṇava, a treatise on Jain Yoga in roughly 2200 Sanskrit verses composed by Śubhacandra.—Accordingly, “Where is the body, which is filled with blood (asṛj), flesh and fat, has a skeleton of slender bones, is bound with tendons and is of bad odour, praised? Continually pouring forth putrid smells through [its] nine orifices, the human body is ever perishable [and] dependent on other [things]”.

Synonyms: Rudhira, Asra.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Aśrin (अश्रिन्).—a. Having tears, in tears.

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Asṛj (असृज्).—n. [na sṛjyate itararāgavat saṃsṛjyate sahajatvāt na-sṛjkvin Tv.]

1) Blood; भूम्या असुरसृगात्मा क्व स्वित् (bhūmyā asurasṛgātmā kva svit) Ṛgveda 1.164.4.

2) The planet Mars.

3) Saffron. m. Name of the 16th of the 27 Yogas; धनी कुरूपः कुमतिर्दुरात्मा विदेशगामी रुधिरप्रकोपः महाप्रलोभी पुरुषो बलीयानसृक्प्रसूतौ किल यस्य जन्तोः (dhanī kurūpaḥ kumatirdurātmā videśagāmī rudhiraprakopaḥ mahāpralobhī puruṣo balīyānasṛkprasūtau kila yasya jantoḥ) || Śabdak.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Asṛj (असृज्).—n. (-sṛk) Blood. E. a neg. sṛj to create, kvip aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Asṛj (असृज्).—i. e. asar-, for 1. as + an, which is the base of several cases, -j (vb. jan), n. Blood, [Pañcatantra] 21, 12.

— With asan, cf. [Latin] san + ies; with asar, [Latin] assir, with *asan-j, [Latin] sanguis.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Asṛj (असृज्).—[neuter] blood.

--- OR ---

Āsṛj (आसृज्).—shoot hither, pour in or out, admit ([especially] to copulation).

Āsṛj is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms ā and sṛj (सृज्).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Asṛj (असृज्):—k (once d, [Taittirīya-saṃhitā vii]) n. (m. or f. only, [Harivaṃśa 9296]) blood, [Ṛg-veda i, 164, 4; Atharva-veda] etc. [for the weak cases See asan; beside, in later language, forms like [instrumental case] asṛjā ([Rāmāyaṇa iii, 8, 4]) and [genitive case] asṛjas ([Suśruta]) are found]

2) n. saffron, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) m. (k) the planet Mars; a kind of religious abstraction, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) Name of the 16th of the astrological Yogas, also called Siddhi, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) Āsṛj (आसृज्):—[=ā-√sṛj] [Parasmaipada] ([imperative] 2. sg. ā-sṛja) [Ātmanepada] ([perfect tense] 3. [plural] ā-sasṛjire) to pour out upon, pour in [Ṛg-veda];

—to admit (a stallion to a mare), [Ṛg-veda ix, 97, 18];

—to adorn, decorate, [Ṛg-veda v, 52, 6];

—to carry near;

—to procure, [Kātyāyana-śrauta-sūtra]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Asṛṅ (असृङ्):—[from asṛj] (in [compound] for asṛj).

2) Asrin (अस्रिन्):—[from asra] mfn. idem ([gana] sukhādi q.v.)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Asṛj (असृज्):—(k) 5. n. Blood.

[Sanskrit to German]

Asrij in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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