Asitanga, Asitāṅga: 7 definitions

Introduction:

Asitanga means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Kubjikāmata-tantra

Asitāṅga (असिताङ्ग):—The Sanskrit name of the central male deity of the Somamaṇḍala (second maṇḍala of the Khecarīcakra), according to the kubjikāmata-tantra. According to this text, eight female deities are born from his body, occupying the eight petals of the Somamaṇḍala.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Asitanga in Purana glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Asitāṅga (असिताङ्ग).—A Bhairava on the sixth parva of geyacakra.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa IV. 19. 77-8.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shilpashastra (iconography)

Source: Wisdom Library: Śilpa-śāstra

Asitāṅga (असिताङ्ग) is the Sanskrit name of a form of Bhairava. According to the Rudrayāmala, there are eight main forms of Bhairava who control the eight directions of this universe. The term is used throughout Śilpaśāstra literature.

Asitāṅga has the following eight manifestations:

  1. Asitāṅga, 
  2. Viśālākṣa,
  3. Mārtāṇḍa,
  4. Modakapriya,
  5. Svacchanda,
  6. Vighnasantuṣṭa,
  7. Khecara,
  8. Sacarācara.

All these are of golden complexion and have good looking limbs, and carry the triśūla, the ḍamaru, the pāśa and the khaḍga.

Shilpashastra book cover
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Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Asitāṅga (असिताङ्ग) refers to one of the eight Bhairavas  (bhairavāṣṭaka) associated with Oṃkārapīṭha (also called Oḍḍiyāna, Ādipīṭha or Uḍapīṭha), according to the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—[...] The eight Bhairavas (bhairavāṣṭaka): Niṣkala, Asitāṅga, Saṃvarta, Ānandabhairava, Niṣtaraṅga, Karāla, Amogha, Khecara.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Asitāṅga (असिताङ्ग):—[from asita] m. a form of Śiva (especially mentioned in Tantras), [Brahma-purāṇa etc.]

[Sanskrit to German]

Asitanga in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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