Asidhara, Asidhārā, Āsidhāra, Asidhāra, Asi-dhara: 12 definitions

Introduction:

Asidhara means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions

Asidhāra (असिधार) or Asidhāravrata refers to the “sword-blade observance”, according to the Guhyasūtra chapter 3.—Accordingly, “[...] If one torments the body with rain, cold and heat, …, devoted to recitation and meditation, this is called the Great Observance. A woman skilled in the pleasures of love-making, endowed with beauty and youth; such a woman one should procure, holding one’s senses back from the objects of the senses, and one should kiss and embrace [her], placing the penis upon her sex while remaining focussed upon recitation and meditation—one performs [thus] the Sword-Blade Observance (asidhāra-vrata). If one should succumb to the control of desire, then one certainly falls into hell. [...]”.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Asidhara in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

asidhārā : (f.) the edge of a sword.

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

asidhārā (असिधारा).—f The sharp edge of a sword. अ. vrata n An austere life of mighty resolves. Strenuous life.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Āsidhāra (आसिधार).—[asidhārā iva astyatra aṇ] Name of a particular vow; अभ्यस्यतीव व्रतमासिधारम् (abhyasyatīva vratamāsidhāram) R.13.67; for explanation see असिधारा (asidhārā).

Derivable forms: āsidhāram (आसिधारम्).

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Asidhārā (असिधारा).—the edge of a sword; सुरगज इवं दन्तैर्भग्नदैत्यासिधारैः (suragaja ivaṃ dantairbhagnadaityāsidhāraiḥ) R.1.86,41.

Asidhārā is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms asi and dhārā (धारा).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Asidharā (असिधरा).—name of a rākṣasī: Mahā-Māyūrī 241.33.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Asidhārā (असिधारा).—f.

(-rā) The edge of a sword. E. asi and dhārā edge.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Āsidhāra (आसिधार).—i. e. asi-dhārā + a, adj. As difficult as standing on the edge of a sword (cf. vrata), [Raghuvaṃśa, (ed. Stenzler.)] 13, 67.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Asidhārā (असिधारा).—[feminine] the edge of a sword.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Asidhara (असिधर):—[=asi-dhara] [from asi] m. Name of a man, [Rājataraṅgiṇī]

2) Asidhārā (असिधारा):—[=asi-dhārā] [from asi] f. the blade of a sword, [Raghuvaṃśa] etc.

3) Āsidhāra (आसिधार):—mfn. ([from] asi-dhārā), relating to or being like the edge of a sword (e.g. ṃ vratam, a vow as difficult as standing on the edge of a sword, [Raghuvaṃśa xii, 67]), [Kathāsaritsāgara]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Asidhārā (असिधारा):—[asi-dhārā] (rā) 1. f. The edge of the sword.

[Sanskrit to German]

Asidhara in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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