Ashtapatra, Ashtan-patra, Aṣṭapatra: 3 definitions

Introduction:

Ashtapatra means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Aṣṭapatra can be transliterated into English as Astapatra or Ashtapatra, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

[«previous next»] — Ashtapatra in Ayurveda glossary
Source: Shodhganga: Edition translation and critical study of yogasarasamgraha

Aṣṭapatra refers to a medicinal recipe mentioned in the Tailakhaṇḍa (verse 3.11) of the 15th-century Yogasārasaṅgraha (Yogasara-saṅgraha) by Vāsudeva: an unpublished Keralite work representing an Ayurvedic compendium of medicinal recipes. The Tailakhaṇḍa [mentioning aṣṭapatra] contains recipes and medicated oils (taila) that treat the patients on such conditions as fever, dyspnoea, cough, asthma, etc.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Ashtapatra in Shaivism glossary
Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions

Aṣṭapatra (अष्टपत्र) refers to “eight-petalled (lotuses)”, according to verse 4.497ff of the Brahmayāmala-tantra (or Picumata), an early 7th century Śaiva text consisting of twelve-thousand verses.—Accordingly, “[...] A series of nine lotuses is visualized situated at points in the body called granthis (knots or joints). These are located at the crown of the head, the forehead, throat, navel, knees, mouth, heart, genitals, and feet, following the order of their sequence in nyāsa. he eight-petalled lotuses (aṣṭapatra) situated therein are loci for installation of the principal nine deities: Kapālīśabhairava, who is installed in the crown lotus, and two sets of four goddesses, the Devīs and the Dūtīs. [...]”.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Kannada-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Ashtapatra in Kannada glossary
Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Aṣṭapatra (ಅಷ್ಟಪತ್ರ):—[noun] a printing or writing paper of eighth size of the standard (double-foolscap) size.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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