Ashatana, Aśātanā: 5 definitions

Introduction:

Ashatana means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Aśātanā can be transliterated into English as Asatana or Ashatana, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Kavya (poetry)

[«previous next»] — Ashatana in Kavya glossary
Source: OpenEdition books: Vividhatīrthakalpaḥ (Kāvya)

Āśātanā (आशातना) in Sanskrit (or Āsāyaṇā in Prakrit) refers to “offense, blame”, as is mentioned in the Vividhatīrthakalpa by Jinaprabhasūri (13th century A.D.): an ancient text devoted to various Jaina holy places (tīrthas).—(cf. Jayantavuaya 1954 p. 198; Sircar 1966 p. 30; Balbir 1986 p. 30); in the context, it is a “public censure” in which a statue is trampled underfoot.

Kavya book cover
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Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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In Jainism

Jain philosophy

Source: archive.org: Anekanta Jaya Pataka of Haribhadra Suri

Āśātanā (आशातना) refers to “destruction of advantage”, as mentioned in the Anekāntajayapatākā-prakaraṇa, a Śvetāmbara Jain philosophical work written by Haribhadra Sūri.—[Cf. Vol. II, P. 208, l. 7]

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India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Aśātanā.—(HA), Jain; disrespect or disobedience. Note: aśātanā is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as mythology, zoology, royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Āśātanā (आशातना):—[=ā-śātanā] f. injury, violation, [Śīlāṅka]

2) [v.s. ...] temptation, ibidem

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Āśātana (आशातन) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Āsāyaṇa, Āsāyaṇā.

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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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