Ashakti, Āśakti, Aśakti, Asakti, Āsakti: 19 definitions

Introduction:

Ashakti means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit terms Āśakti and Aśakti can be transliterated into English as Asakti or Ashakti, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

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In Hinduism

Samkhya (school of philosophy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Sāṃkhya philosophy

Aśakti (अशक्ति, “incapacity”) refers to a category of pratyayasarga (intellectual products) according to the Sāṃkhya theory of evolution. Pratyayasarga is the first of two types of sarga (products) that come into being during tattvapariṇāma (elemental manifestations), which in turn, evolve out of the two types of pariṇāma (change, modification). According to Īśvarakṛṣṇa, the defects of the eleven senses (indriyabadha) and the defects of the buddhi (buddhibadha) are said to make up incapacity (aśakti).

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Samkhya (सांख्य, Sāṃkhya) is a dualistic school of Hindu philosophy (astika) and is closeley related to the Yoga school. Samkhya philosophy accepts three pramanas (‘proofs’) only as valid means of gaining knowledge. Another important concept is their theory of evolution, revolving around prakriti (matter) and purusha (consciousness).

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Vyakarana (Sanskrit grammar)

Source: Wikisource: A dictionary of Sanskrit grammar

Aśakti (अशक्ति).—Incapacity to pronounce words correctly; cf. अशक्त्या कयाचिद् ब्राह्मण्या ऋतक इति प्रयोक्तव्ये लृतक इति प्रयुक्तम् (aśaktyā kayācid brāhmaṇyā ṛtaka iti prayoktavye lṛtaka iti prayuktam) M.Bh. on Śiva-sūtra 2.

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Vyakarana (व्याकरण, vyākaraṇa) refers to Sanskrit grammar and represents one of the six additional sciences (vedanga) to be studied along with the Vedas. Vyakarana concerns itself with the rules of Sanskrit grammar and linguistic analysis in order to establish the correct context of words and sentences.

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Vaishnavism (Vaishava dharma)

Source: Pure Bhakti: Bhagavad-gita (4th edition)

Āsakti (आसक्ति) refers to “deep attachment, especially to Bhagavān and His associates; the sixth stage in the development of the bhakti creeper awakened after ruci (taste for bhajana) matures”. (cf. Glossary page from Śrīmad-Bhagavad-Gītā).

Source: Pure Bhakti: Bhajana-rahasya - 2nd Edition

Āsakti (आसक्ति) refers to:—Attachment; this especially refers to attachment for the Lord and His eternal associates. Āsakti occurs when one’s liking for bhajana leads to a direct and deep attachment for the personality who is the object of that bhajana. This is the sixth stage in the development of the creeper of devotion, and is awakened upon the maturing of one’s taste for bhajana. (cf. Glossary page from Bhajana-Rahasya).

Vaishnavism book cover
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Vaishnava (वैष्णव, vaiṣṇava) or vaishnavism (vaiṣṇavism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshipping Vishnu as the supreme Lord. Similar to the Shaktism and Shaivism traditions, Vaishnavism also developed as an individual movement, famous for its exposition of the dashavatara (‘ten avatars of Vishnu’).

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: gurumukhi.ru: Ayurveda glossary of terms

Aśakti (अशक्ति):—Lack of capacity todoproperly

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

āsakti (आसक्ति).—f (S) Intentness upon; closeness of application; fondness of attachment; assiduousness of pursuit.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

āsakti (आसक्ति).—f Zeal; intentnesss upon, close- ness of application.

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Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Aśakti (अशक्ति).—f.

1) Weakness, impotence, powerlessness.

2) Inability, incapacity; श्रमेण तदशक्त्या वा न गुणानामियत्तया (śrameṇa tadaśaktyā vā na guṇānāmiyattayā) R.1.32.

3) (In Sāṅ. Phil.) Incapacity of the intellect to produce knowledge.

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Asakti (असक्ति).—f. The being detached from worldly feelings or passions; असक्तिरनभिष्वङ्गः पुत्रदारगृहादिषु (asaktiranabhiṣvaṅgaḥ putradāragṛhādiṣu) Bg.13.9.

Derivable forms: asaktiḥ (असक्तिः).

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Āśakti (आशक्ति).—f. Power, ability.

Derivable forms: āśaktiḥ (आशक्तिः).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Āsakti (आसक्ति).—f.

1) Attachment, devotion, fondness; बालिशचरितेष्वासक्तिः (bāliśacariteṣvāsaktiḥ) K.12; intentness, application.

2) Waylaying (Ved.).

-kti ind. Ved. Purposely.

Derivable forms: āsaktiḥ (आसक्तिः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Aśakti (अशक्ति).—f.

(-ktiḥ) Inability, incapability, weakness, impotence. E. a neg. śakti power.

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Āśakti (आशक्ति).—f.

(-ktiḥ) Power, ability, might. E. āṅ before śakti power.

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Āsakti (आसक्ति).—f.

(-ktiḥ) Attachment to one object or pursuit, diligence, application. E. āṅ before ṣañj to embrace, ktin aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Aśakti (अशक्ति).—f. want of strength, [Bhartṛhari, (ed. Bohlen.)] 2, 44.

Aśakti is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms a and śakti (शक्ति).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Aśakti (अशक्ति).—[feminine] inability.

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Asakti (असक्ति).—[feminine] non-attachment (to worldly things).

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Āsakti (आसक्ति).—[feminine] adhering, clinging to, pursuit, devotion; as [adverb] coherently, entirely.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Aśakti (अशक्ति):—[=a-śakti] [from a-śakta] f. inability, incapability.

2) Asakti (असक्ति):—[=a-sakti] [from a-sakta] f. the being detached from worldly feelings or passions, [Bhagavad-gītā xiii, 9.]

3) Āśakti (आशक्ति):—[=ā-śakti] [from ā-śak] f. might, power, ability, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) Āsakti (आसक्ति):—[=ā-sakti] [from ā-sañj] f. the act of adhering or attaching one’s self firmly behind

5) [v.s. ...] placing behind

6) [v.s. ...] waylaying, [Ṛg-veda]

7) [v.s. ...] devotedness, attachment

8) [v.s. ...] diligence, application

9) [v.s. ...] ind. uninterruptedly, wholly, throughout, [Śatapatha-brāhmaṇa]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Aśakti (अशक्ति):—[a-śakti] (ktiḥ) 1. f. Inability.

2) Asakti (असक्ति):—[a-sakti] (ktiḥ) 2. f. Detachment from worldly objects.

3) Āśakti (आशक्ति):—[ā-śakti] (ktiḥ) 2. f. Ability.

4) Āsakti (आसक्ति):—[ā-sakti] (ktiḥ) 2. f. Attachment to one object or pursuit.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Aśakti (अशक्ति) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Asatti, Āsatti.

[Sanskrit to German]

Ashakti in German

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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Ashakti in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Āsakti (आसक्ति):—(nf) attachment; fascination; fondness, addiction.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Aśakti (ಅಶಕ್ತಿ):—

1) [noun] want of physical strength to do something or to resist a disease; weakness.

2) [noun] inability; incapacity.

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Āsakti (ಆಸಕ್ತಿ):—

1) [noun] intent attachment of mind; interest; devotion; fondness.

2) [noun] the sticking quality; adhesiveness; stickiness.

3) [noun] excessive love; attachment that is unreasonably emotional.

4) [noun] a strong longing for getting a thing.

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Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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