Asesa, Ashesha: 22 definitions

Introduction:

Asesa means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, Marathi, Jainism, Prakrit, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Ashesh.

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Aśeṣa (अशेष) (Cf. Niḥśeṣa) refers to “all things”, according to the Khacakrapañcakastotra (“hymn to the five wheels of emptiness”) by Jñānanetra, the founder of the Kashmiri Kālīkrama.—Accordingly, “I bow to the Great Reality, the venerable (goddess) Maṅgalā, she who is the mother of all things [i.e., aśeṣa-mātā], the energy of Śiva, the awesome power of consciousness. (I praise her) the great wave of the Great Reality filled with all things, (she who is) the light of the Inexplicable, the Sun, Moon and the Fire of (universal) destruction”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Aśeṣa (अशेष) refers to “complete (in every detail)”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.14 (“The Birth of Tāraka and Vajrāṅga”).—Accordingly, as Nārada said to Brahmā: “[...] How did Śivā perform the severe penance for the sake of happiness? How did the primordial energy who is greater than the universe secure Śiva as her husband? O great scholar, narrate all these complete in every detail to me [i.e., aśeṣaetatsarvamaśeṣeṇa viśeṣeṇa], your son, who has dedicated his soul to Śiva and who has developed full faith in Him”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions

Aśeṣa (अशेष) refers to “everything”, according to the Jayadrathayāmala, Ṣaṭka 1 verse 13.3–18::—Accordingly, “[...] Besides (bhūyas) the nirvāṇadīkṣā bestowing liberation is of many kinds: śivadharma-dīkṣā, lokadharma-dīkṣā and the initiation which kills quickly, causing the body to fall. [The initiation] which reveals everything through the attainment of Śiva (śivāpti-darśita-aśeṣa) through the performance of post-initiatory rites once the three bonds (i.e. the three impurities) have ceased due to the purification of the consciousness on one [of the six] paths, [that] initiation is known to be the śivadharmadīkṣā, which bestows the attainment of liberation because it is contrary to the mundane practice. [...]”.

Source: SOAS University of London: Protective Rites in the Netra Tantra

Aśeṣa (अशेष) refers to the “entirety” (of the body), according to the Netratantroddyota commentary on the Netratantra of Kṣemarāja: a Śaiva text from the 9th century in which Śiva (Bhairava) teaches Pārvatī topics such as metaphysics, cosmology, and soteriology.—Accordingly, [verse 4.5cd-6, while describing the purification process of the initiand]—“[...] [And after that,] [the bonds] have been reduced to ashes and reside there (tatsthite). [He continues to use the same astramantra [and] reduces to ashes the bonds, which completely cease and are without latent trace. [The locative of] tatsthita means he has visualized oneness of the consciousness of the disciple with the mūla [mantra]. The entirety [of the disciple's] body has ceased (nivṛtta-aśeṣa-śarīra). [...]”.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Pancaratra (worship of Nārāyaṇa)

Source: Universität Wien: Sudarśana's Worship at the Royal Court According to the Ahirbudhnyasaṃhitā

Aśeṣa (अशेष) refers to “all” (i.e., ‘everything’), according to the Ahirbudhnyasaṃhitā, belonging to the Pāñcarātra tradition which deals with theology, rituals, iconography, narrative mythology and others.—Accordingly, “[This rite] should be employed by utterly glorious Sovereigns when they are in distress—[for this rite] removes the three kinds of sorrow which begin with the one relating to oneself; causes the destruction of all afflictions (aśeṣaādhīnāṃ cāpy aśeṣāṇāṃ); is marked by auspiciousness; destroys all enemies; pacifies (i.e. removes unwanted consequences of ritual mistakes etc.); is the cause of triumph; kills the Demons; brings about prosperities; subdues all; bestows the longest of lives; is meritorious; [and] was perfomed by ancient Kings”.

Pancaratra book cover
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Pancaratra (पाञ्चरात्र, pāñcarātra) represents a tradition of Hinduism where Narayana is revered and worshipped. Closeley related to Vaishnavism, the Pancaratra literature includes various Agamas and tantras incorporating many Vaishnava philosophies.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

asesa : (adj.) entire; all.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Asesa, (adj.) (a + sesa) not leaving a remnant, without a remainder, all, entire, complete Sn. 2 sq. , 351, 355, 500, 1037 (= sabba Nd2 113). As °- (adv.) entirely, fully, completely Sn. p. 141 (°virāga-nirodha); Miln. 212 (°vacana inclusive statement). (Page 89)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

aśēṣa (अशेष).—a (S) That leaves no remainder; all, the whole. Ex. dvidhā kēlī aśēṣēṃ ||

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

aśēṣa (अशेष).—a The whole; without any remainder.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Aśeṣa (अशेष).—a. [na. ba.] Without remainder, whole, all, entire, complete, perfect; अशेषशेमुषीमोषं माषमश्नामि केवलम् (aśeṣaśemuṣīmoṣaṃ māṣamaśnāmi kevalam) Udb.; क्रतोरशेषेण फलेन युज्यताम् (kratoraśeṣeṇa phalena yujyatām) R.3.65,48.

-ṣaḥ Nonremainder.

-ṣam, aśeṣeṇa, aśeṣataḥ ind. wholly, entirely, completely; तथाविधस्तावदशेषमस्तु सः (tathāvidhastāvadaśeṣamastu saḥ) Kumārasambhava 5.82; येन भूतान्यशेषेण द्रक्ष्यस्यात्मन्यथो मयि (yena bhūtānyaśeṣeṇa drakṣyasyātmanyatho mayi) Bhagavadgītā (Bombay) 4.35, 1.16; एतद्वोऽयं भृगुः शास्त्रं श्रावयिष्यस्यशेषतः (etadvo'yaṃ bhṛguḥ śāstraṃ śrāvayiṣyasyaśeṣataḥ) Manusmṛti 1.59,2.66,9.15.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Aśeṣa (अशेष).—nt., a high number: (Ārya-)Mañjuśrīmūlakalpa 343.26 (= 10 gharā; see mahāśeṣa).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Aśeṣa (अशेष).—mfn.

(-ṣaḥ-ṣā-ṣaṃ) 1. Entire, all the whole. 2. Infinite, endless. E. a neg. and śeṣa remainder.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Aśeṣa (अशेष).—adj., f. ṣā, entire, all, every, [Mālatīmādhava, (ed. Calc.)] 2, 3; [Raghuvaṃśa, (ed. Stenzler.)] 3, 65; [Pañcatantra] 163, 7. acc. ṣam, instr. ṣeṇa, and adv. ṣa + tas, entirely, [Kumārasaṃbhava, (ed. Stenzler.)] 5, 82; [Bhagavadgītā, (ed. Schlegel.)] 10, 16; [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 1, 59.

Aśeṣa is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms a and śeṣa (शेष).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Aśeṣa (अशेष).—[masculine] no rest or remainder; adj. entire, whole. aśeṣam, aśeṣeṇa, & aśeṣatas [adverb] entirely, wholly.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Aśeṣa (अशेष):—[=a-śeṣa] mf(ā)n. without remainder, entire, perfect, all

2) [v.s. ...] m. non-remainder, [Kātyāyana-śrauta-sūtra]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Aśeṣa (अशेष):—[a-śeṣa] (ṣaḥ-ṣā-ṣaṃ) a. Entire.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Aśeṣa (अशेष) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Asesa.

[Sanskrit to German]

Asesa in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Aśeṣa (अशेष) [Also spelled ashesh]:—(a) all; complete, entire.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

Asesa (असेस) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Aśeṣa.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Aśēṣa (ಅಶೇಷ):—[adjective] having no remainder; left with nothing; entire; all.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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