Arisa, Ariṣa, Arisha: 7 definitions

Introduction:

Arisa means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Ariṣa can be transliterated into English as Arisa or Arisha, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Kavya (poetry)

Source: OpenEdition books: Vividhatīrthakalpaḥ (Kāvya)

Arisa (अरिस) in Prakrit (or Arśas in Sanskrit) refers to “hemorrhoids”, as is mentioned in the Vividhatīrthakalpa by Jinaprabhasūri (13th century A.D.): an ancient text devoted to various Jaina holy places (tīrthas).—Cf. Meulenbeld 1974 p. 619.

Kavya book cover
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Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Wisdom Library: Local Names of Plants and Drugs

Arisa [ଆରିସା] in the Odia language is the name of a plant identified with Crinum asiaticum L. from the Amaryllidaceae (Nargis) family. For the possible medicinal usage of arisa, you can check this page for potential sources and references, although be aware that any some or none of the side-effects may not be mentioned here, wether they be harmful or beneficial to health.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

arisa : (nt.) haemorrhoids; piles.

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Ariṣa (अरिष).—[na riṣyate vicchidyate] A continuous down-pour of rain.

-ṣaḥ A sort of disease in the anus.

Derivable forms: ariṣam (अरिषम्).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ariṣa (अरिष).—m.

(-ṣaḥ) 1. Disease arising from meat and drink. 2. A stream of water from the clouds.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ariṣa (अरिष):—[ari-ṣa] (ṣaḥ) 1. m. Disease; rain.

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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

Ārisa (आरिस) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Ārṣa.

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Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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