Ardita, Arddita: 12 definitions

Introduction:

Ardita means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: archive.org: Vagbhata’s Ashtanga Hridaya Samhita (first 5 chapters)

Ardita (अर्दित) refers to “hemiplegia of the face”, mentioned in verse 2.17 and 4.10-11 of the Aṣṭāṅgahṛdayasaṃhitā (Sūtrasthāna) by Vāgbhaṭa.—Accordingly, “[...] Headache, weakness of the senses, stiffness of the neck, and hemiplegia of the face [viz., ardita] (result from the suppression) of sneezing. By pungent inhalants, collyria, perfumes, and sternutatories and by looking at the sun one shall stimulate impeded sneezing; moreover, one shall repeatedly use lubricants and diaphoretics. [...]”.

Note: An exceptional position is held by ardita (“hemiplegia of the face”), which has been represented by a tautology: kha yo ’gram chag (“wry mouth (and) distorted [lit. broken] cheek”), either term being earlier (2.3 & 17) used alone in the same sense.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Ardita (अर्दित) refers to “harassment”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.16 (“Brahmā consoles the gods”).—Accordingly, as the Gods said to Brahmā: “[...] O dear, lord of all, we are extremely harassed and agitated due to Tāraka. Agni, Yama, Varuṇa, Nirṛti, Vāyu and other guardians of the deities are under his control. None of them is ever independent. All serve him in the manner of human beings accompanied by their followers. Being harassed [i.e., ardita] by him, the gods have become subservient of him. They are engaged in carrying out his wishes. All of us are his servants. [...]”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: SOAS University of London: Protective Rites in the Netra Tantra

Ardita (अर्दित, “tetanus”) refers to one of the worldly ailments, according to the Netratantra of Kṣemarāja: a Śaiva text from the 9th century in which Śiva (Bhairava) teaches Pārvatī topics such as metaphysics, cosmology, and soteriology.—The Netratantra’s Second Chapter begins with the goddess Pārvatī’s request that Śiva reveal to her the remedy for the ailments that afflict divine and worldly beings. Among these maladies she lists [e.g, tetanus (ardita)], [...]. Śiva responds that no one has ever before asked such a question and therefore he has never before revealed the answer. He emphasizes the importance of the mṛtyuñjaya-mantra and the Netra-tantra’s tripartite approaches of mantra, yoga, and jñāna (knowledge).

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

Ardita (अर्दित) refers to “(being) afflicted” (by the planet of one’s birth), according to the 11th century Jñānārṇava, a treatise on Jain Yoga in roughly 2200 Sanskrit verses composed by Śubhacandra.—Accordingly, “Companions are born only for this one to enjoy possessions but not to endure the pitiless succession of calamities arising from one’s own action. Why do the stupid, who are afflicted by the planet of [their] birth (janmagraha-ardita), not see solitariness which is perceived directly in the occurrence of birth and death?”.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Ardita (अर्दित).—p. p. [ard-kta] Tormented, afflicted; begged &c.

-tam A disease, spasm of the jaw-bones, tetanus or hemiflegia (paralysis of the muscles on one side of the face and neck).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ardita (अर्दित).—mfn.

(-taḥ-tā-taṃ) 1. Asked, requested, begged. 2. Killed, injured. 3. Pained, afflicted. 4. Gone. n.

(-taṃ) A disease, Hemiplegin, paralysis of the muscles on one side of the face and neck. E. arda to go, to ask, &c. affix kta, and iṭ inserted.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Ardita (अर्दित):—[from ard] mfn. asked, requested, begged, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

2) [v.s. ...] injured, pained, afflicted, tormented, wounded, [Mahābhārata] etc.

3) [v.s. ...] killed, destroyed, [ib.]

4) [v.s. ...] n. Name of a disease (spasm of the jaw-bones, trismus, tetanus; or hemiplegia id est. paralysis of the muscles on one side of the face and neck), [Suśruta]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ardita (अर्दित):—[(taḥ-tā-taṃ) a.] Asked; injured. n. (taṃ) A disease, hemiplegia.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Ardita (अर्दित) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Aṭṭiya, Addiya.

[Sanskrit to German]

Ardita in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Ardita (ಅರ್ದಿತ):—[adjective] over thrown; defeated; subdued.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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