Arcis: 11 definitions

Introduction:

Arcis means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Archis.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Arcis (अर्चिस्).—Pṛthu and the Arcis were born from the arms of Vena. (Bhāgavata, 4th Skandha, Chapter 15). Pṛthn did tapas in forest and gave up his physical body in fire and attained Vaikuṇṭha (the abode of Viṣṇu) with the Arcis. (Bhāgavata, 4th Skandha). For details see Pṛthu.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Jainism

Arcis (अर्चिस्) refers to a species of Anudiśa gods, according to Jain cosmological texts in the Digambara tradition where the Anudiśa heaven is one of the five heavens of the upper world (ūrdhvaloka).

General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Arcis (अर्चिस्).—n. (-rciḥ) [अर्च्-इसि (arc-isi) Uṇ.2.17]

1) A ray of light, flame; यत्ते पवित्रमर्चिष्यग्ने विततमन्तरा (yatte pavitramarciṣyagne vitatamantarā) Rv.9.67.23; प्रदक्षिणार्चिर्हविरग्निराददे (pradakṣiṇārcirhaviragnirādade) R.3.14.

2) Light, lustre; प्रशमादर्चिषाम् (praśamādarciṣām) Ku.2.2; Ratn.4.16. (said to be also f.) f. Name of the wife of कृशाश्व (kṛśāśva) and mother of धूमकेतु (dhūmaketu). m.

1) A ray of light.

2) Fire. अर्चिर्मयूखशिखयोः (arcirmayūkhaśikhayoḥ) ......Nm.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Arcis (अर्चिस्).—m.

(-rciḥ) 1. Flame. 2. A ray of light. 3. Light, luster. E. arca to worship, and isi Unadi aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Arcis (अर्चिस्).—[arc + is], f. and n. 1. A ray of light, Chr. 294, 5 = [Rigveda.] i. 92, 5. 2. Flame, [Rāmāyaṇa] 5, 75, 6; 6, 36, 117.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Arcis (अर्चिस्).—[neuter] (later also [feminine]) beam, flame.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Arcis (अर्चिस्):—[from arc] n. ray of light, flame, light, lustre, [Ṛg-veda] (once. [plural] arcīnṣi, [Ṛg-veda vii, 62,1]), [Atharva-veda; Śatapatha-brāhmaṇa] etc.

2) [v.s. ...] f. idem, [Śatapatha-brāhmaṇa ii; Upaniṣad] etc., (is), Name of the wife of Kṛśāśva and mother of Dhūmaketu, [Bhāgavata-purāṇa]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Arcis (अर्चिस्):—(ciḥ) 2. m. Flame, light.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Arcis (अर्चिस्) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Acci.

[Sanskrit to German]

Arcis in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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