Aranatha, Aranātha, Ara-natha: 3 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Aranatha means something in Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Jainism

Aranātha (अरनाथ) is another name for Ara, the eighteenth Tīrthaṅkara (Janism recognizes 24 such teachers or Siddhas). His colour is gold (kāñcana), according to Aparājitapṛcchā (221.5-7). His height is 30 dhanuṣa (a single dhanuṣa (or, ‘bow’) equals 6 ft), thus, roughly corresponding to 55 meters. His emblem, or symbol, is a Nandyāvarta or fish.

Aranātha’s father is Sudarśana and his mother is Devī according to Śvetāmbara or Mitrā according to Digambara. It is an ancient Jain practice to worship the Tīrthaṅkara’s parents in various rites, such as the pratiṣṭhāvidhi, according to the Ācāradinakara (14th century work on Jain conduct written by Vardhamāna Sūri).

Source: archive.org: The Jaina Iconography

Aranātha (अरनाथ) refers to the eighteenth of twenty-four Tīrthaṃkaras or Jinas, commonly depicted in Jaina iconography.—The eighteenth Jina Aranātha carries with him the mystic symbol of either the Nandyāvarta (a kind of Svastika) or a fish. His ministerial staff consists of the Yakṣa named Yakṣendra and Yakṣiṇī named Dhāraṇī Devī. The sacred tree peculiar to him is Cūta or mango tree. Govinda Rāja had the honour of holding his fly-whisk.

Aranātha’s father was a Kṣatriya prince of the lunar race, he was known by the name of Sudarśana. The Jina’s mother was queen Mitrasenā. Their capital was at Hastināpura, where Aranātha was born. This Jina also became an emperor. He obtained the name of Ara because his mother saw a dream of a wheel (Ara) of jewels. It is obvious to explain his emblem of a Nandyāvarta. This, as also fishes, come under the Aṣṭamaṅgala or eight auspicious symbols.

Source: archive.org: Trisastisalakapurusacaritra

Aranātha (अरनाथ) or Ara refers to the eighteenth of the twenty-four Tīrthaṅkaras praised in the first book (ādīśvara-caritra) [chapter 1] of Hemacandra’s 11th century Triṣaṣṭiśalākāpuruṣacaritra (“lives of the 63 illustrious persons”): a Sanskrit epic poem narrating the history and legends of sixty-three important persons in Jainism.

Accordingly, “[...] we worship the Arhats, who at all times and all places purify the people of the three worlds by their name, representation, substance, and actual existence. [...] May the Blessed Aranātha, the sun in the sky of the fourth division of time[9] grant us pleasure with the Śrī of the fourth object of existence (mokṣa)”.

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context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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