Arada Kalama, Ārāḍa Kālāma, Aradakalama: 1 definition

Introduction

Introduction:

Arada Kalama means something in Buddhism, Pali. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

[«previous next»] — Arada Kalama in Mahayana glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra

Ārāḍa kālāma in Sanskrit or Ārāḷa Kālāma in Pali, is one of the two teachers of the Buddha, according to the Mahāparinirvāṇa-sūtra (Pali, Mahāparinibbāna-sutta), as mentioned in the 2nd century Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra chapter 36.—Notes: Meeting the Buddha between Kuśinagarī and Pāpā, a minister of the Mallas called Putkasa spoke to him about his teacher Ārāḍa Kālāma and his extraordinary power of concentration: one day when he was deep in meditation, Ārāḍa did not hear the noise of a caravan of five hundred wagons that passed by close to him. The Buddha affirmed that he too possessed a similar power of absorption and gave him as proof an incident that had occurred in the village of Ādumā (in Pāli, Ātumā).

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context information

Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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