Apaharin, Apahārin, Apahārī, Apahari: 15 definitions

Introduction:

Apaharin means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Buddhism, Pali. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Apahārin (अपहारिन्) refers to “one who steals” (the sacrificial offerings of the Heroes), according to the Ṣaṭsāhasrasaṃhitā, an expansion of the Kubjikāmatatantra: the earliest popular and most authoritative Tantra of the Kubjikā cult.—Accordingly, “[...] Abandoning the enveloping cover (kañcuka) of sin, O dear one, by praising the sacred seats he sees no misfortune even if he is yoked to terrible sins (or) has killed his mother, father or a cow or steals the sacrificial offerings of the Heroes (vīradravya-apahārin) or has fallen from the Rule due to (his) carelessness or even if he has stopped uttering the Mantras”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions

1) Apahārin (अपहारिन्) (Cf. Apahāriṇī) refers to “that which removes (the worldly religion)”, according to the Tantrāloka 15.27-30.—Accordingly, “He should destroy all the past and future karmas for the liberation-seeker who is indifferent. He should only purify the prārabdha karma. For the Sādhaka he should purify [the karmas] in the same manner for the purpose of powers. This is the śivadharmiṇī-dīkṣā, which removes the worldly religion (lokadharma-apahāriṇī). The purification of only the bad karma, and not the meritorious, is the lokadharmiṇī-dīkṣā, which is without the worship of mantras. Upon the death of his current body he enjoys [the supernatural powers], starting with aṇimā; and having enjoyed these he goes upwards to where he was joined [during the initiation ritual], at a sakala or niṣkala level”.

2) Apahārin (विषापहारिन्) refers to “that which counteract (poison)”, according to the Mālinīvijayottaratantra, chapter 18 (“appropriate conduct of the accomplished Yogin”) verses 18.74-81 (as quoted in the Tantrāloka verse 4.213-221ab).—Accordingly, “[...] Moreover, the one whose consciousness is fixed on reality, partaking even in the pleasures of the senses, is not touched by bad consequences, just as the petal of a lotus (is not affected) by water. The Yogin who has great understanding is the one who is similar to the person who, armed with mantras that counteract poison (viṣa-apahārin-mantra-ādi-saṃnaddha) and the like, is not deluded by the poison even while devouring it”.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

Apahārin (अपहारिन्) refers to the “thieves (of life)”, according to the 11th century Jñānārṇava, a treatise on Jain Yoga in roughly 2200 Sanskrit verses composed by Śubhacandra.—Accordingly, “The pleasures that are cherished, like the poison of a snake, are the thieves of life (prāṇa-apahārin) immediately and they are produced in the cycle of rebirth by the 30 gods”.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Apaharin in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

apahari : (aor. of apaharati) removed; took away; robbed.

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Apahārin (अपहारिन्).—a. One who or that which takes away, steals, removes, destroys, conceals &c. (usually in comp.); जलापहारिणः (jalāpahāriṇaḥ) H.1; परद्रव्य° (paradravya°) plunderer, thief; परवित्त° (paravitta°); वागपहारकः (vāgapahārakaḥ) Manusmṛti 11.51; Y.3.21; Ms. 4.255; 2.88.

-kaḥ A robber, thief.

See also (synonyms): apahāraka.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Apahārin (अपहारिन्).—mfn. (-rī-riṇī-ri) One who takes away, who seizes, steals, &c. a plunderer, a thief. E. apahṛ to steal, ṇini aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Apahārin (अपहारिन्).—i. e. apa-hṛ + in. I. adj., f. iṇī, Taking away; ravishing, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 2, 88. Ii. m. A thief, [Pañcatantra] 33, 4.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Apahārin (अपहारिन्):—[=apa-hārin] [from apa-hṛ] mfn. = apa-hāraka.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Goldstücker Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Apahārin (अपहारिन्):—[tatpurusha compound] m. f. n.

(-rī-riṇī-ri) 1) Taking away, carrying off, removing; also figurat.; e. g. bhayāpahārin, prāṇāpahārin. E. hṛ with apa, kṛt aff. ṇini.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Apahārin (अपहारिन्):—[apa-hārin] (rī-riṇī-ri) a. Taking away, stealing.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Apahārin (अपहारिन्) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Apahāri, Avahāri.

[Sanskrit to German]

Apaharin in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

Apahāri (अपहारि) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Apahārin.

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Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Apahāri (ಅಪಹಾರಿ):—[noun] = ಅಪಹರಣಕಾರ [apaharanakara].

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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