Anuna, Anūna, Anūnā: 16 definitions

Introduction:

Anuna means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Anūnā (अनूना) refers to the name of a Lady mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. I.59.44, I.65). Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Anūnā) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names

The name used by the Yakkha Punnaka to hide from Dhanjaya his real name, lest he should be mistaken for a slave. The word has the same meaning as Punnaka. J.vi.273-4.

context information

Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

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Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra

Anūna (अनून) refers to “increase” [?], according to Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra (chapter 41).—Accordingly, “[The eighteen āveṇika-dharmas (‘special attributes’)]—[...] (4). The Buddha has no notion of variety.—[...] Furthermore, ‘three times during the night and three times during the day, the Buddha considers beings with his Buddha eye’ and never allows the time of asking himself who can be converted to pass by. Considering beings impartially, he has no notion of variety. Furthermore, the Buddha has praised the good dharmas in many ways and criticized the bad dharmas in many ways. However, faced with good or with bad, his mind shows no increase or decrease ([anūna-anadhika?]—anūnānadhika): it is only in order to save beings that he makes distinctions. Thus he has no notion of variety. [...]”.

Mahayana book cover
context information

Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

anūna : (adj.) not lacking or deficient; complete.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Anūna, (adj.) (Vedic anūna, an + ūna) not lacking, entire, complete, without deficiency J.VI, 273; Dpvs.V.52; Miln.226; DA.I, 248 (+ paripūra, explained by anavaya). Anūnaka = anūna Dpvs.IV, 34. (Page 45)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Anūna (अनून).—a.

1) Not inferior, not less (with abl. expressed or understood); not wanting or lacking in (with instr.); वृन्दावने चैत्ररथादनूने (vṛndāvane caitrarathādanūne) R.6.5; अनूनसारं निषधान्नगेन्द्रात् (anūnasāraṃ niṣadhānnagendrāt) 18.1; आकृतिप्रत्ययादेनामनूनवस्तुकां संभावयामि (ākṛtipratyayādenāmanūnavastukāṃ saṃbhāvayāmi) M.1 of no inferior stuff; इमामनूनां सुरभेरवेहि (imāmanūnāṃ surabheravehi) R.2.54; गुणैरनूनाम् (guṇairanūnām) 6.37; किंचिदूनमनूनर्धेः (kiṃcidūnamanūnardheḥ) R.1.1.

2) Full, whole, entire; large; महर्षभस्कन्धमनूनकन्धरम् (maharṣabhaskandhamanūnakandharam) Kirātārjunīya 14.4; great; Śiśupālavadha 4.11; (before adjectives) very; °गुरुर्नितम्बः (gururnitambaḥ) S. D. excessively big or heavy.

3) Having full power.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Anūna (अनून).—mfn.

(-naḥ-nā-naṃ) 1. Whole, entire. 2. Not less, not inferior. E. an neg. ūna to diminish, and ac aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Anūna (अनून).—[adjective] not wanting, complete, full; no less, no inferior to ([ablative]).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Anūna (अनून):—[=an-ūna] (or anūnaka) mf(ā)n. not less, not inferior to ([ablative]), [Raghuvaṃśa]

2) [v.s. ...] whole, entire

3) [v.s. ...] having full power

4) Anūnā (अनूना):—[=an-ūnā] [from an-ūna] f. Name of an Apsaras, [Harivaṃśa]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Goldstücker Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Anūna (अनून):—[tatpurusha compound] 1. m. f. n.

(-naḥ-nā-nam) 1) Undiminished.

2) Com-plete, full.

3) Not less, not inferior (seq. ablat.). Comp. anyūna. 2. f.

(-nā) The name of an Apsaras. E. a neg. and ūna.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Anūna (अनून):—[a-nūna] (naḥ-nā-naṃ) a. Whole.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Anūna (अनून) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Aṇuṇa.

[Sanskrit to German]

Anuna in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

Aṇuṇa (अणुण) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Anūna.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Anūna (ಅನೂನ):—

1) [adjective] not suffering from any defect or flaw; perfect.

2) [adjective] not lacking in (quantity or quality); sufficient; enough.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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