Angin, Aṅgin, Aṅgī, Angi, Amgi: 22 definitions

Introduction:

Angin means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Buddhism, Pali, Marathi, Jainism, Prakrit, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Aṅgī (अङ्गी) refers to the “limbs”, according to the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, “(Kubjikā) is the colour of (dark) blue collyrium. [...] She wears a tiger skin and a cloak of lion skin. Her limbs are adorned with divine ornaments [i.e., divyābharaṇa-bhūṣā-aṅgī] and she laughs loudly. Her western face is yellow and the one in the north is dark blue. (The one) in the south is black. The eastern one, displayed in front, is red while the one born in the north-east (i.e. above) is (white) as crystal. The uppermost face, worshipped as Parā, (shines) like a thousand suns. Śambhu has said that all the faces have fierce gaping mouths with protruding teeth”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Aṅgī (अङ्गी) refers to “one having a body”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.23 (“Attempt of Himavat to dissuade Pārvatī”).—Accordingly, as Himavat said to Pārvatī: “O Pārvatī, O fortunate one, do not torture yourself by this penance. Dear girl, Śiva is not to be seen. Certainly he is detached. You are a young woman of tender limbs [i.e., su-kumāra-aṅgī]. You will be overpowered and exhausted by this penance. There is no doubt about it. I am speaking the truth. Hence, O comely lady, get up. Come back to our house. Of what avail is Śiva by whom Kāma has been reduced to ashes? [...]”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

Aṅgin (अङ्गिन्) refers to “corporeal souls”, according to the 11th century Jñānārṇava, a treatise on Jain Yoga in roughly 2200 Sanskrit verses composed by Śubhacandra.—Accordingly, “This [virtuous meditation] confers upon corporeal souls (aṅgin) the pleasure, produced from the tranquillity of discrimination because of endless non-attachment, which is the experience of one’s own self [and] is beyond the senses”.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Aṅgin, (adj.) limbed, having limbs or parts, — fold, see catur° & pacc° (under aṅga-paccaṅgin). — f. aṅginī having sprouts or shoots (of a tree) Th.2, 297 (= ThA.226). (Page 7)

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

Aṅgī (अङ्गी).—f (aṅga) The long body garment or frock of children. 2 A long, loose garment.

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aṅgī (अंगी).—a (S) Having limbs, members, appendages or appurtenances.

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āṅgī (आंगी).—f (Or aṅgī) The long garment of children. 2 A long, loose garment.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Aṅgin (अङ्गिन्).—a. [aṅg-astyarthe ini]

1) Corporeal, having limb, embodied, incarnate; धर्मार्थकाममोक्षाणामवतार इवाङ्गवान् (dharmārthakāmamokṣāṇāmavatāra ivāṅgavān) V.1. -भाक् (bhāk) R.1.84. अङ्गिनां तमसेवोभौ गुणौ (aṅgināṃ tamasevobhau guṇau) 38. one who has a body; येनाङ्गविकारः (yenāṅgavikāraḥ) P.II.3.23 येनाङ्गेन विकृतेनाङ्गिनो विकारस्तस्मात् तृतीया (yenāṅgena vikṛtenāṅgino vikārastasmāt tṛtīyā) Sk. व्यायामे वृद्धिरङ्गिनाम् (vyāyāme vṛddhiraṅginām) Śiśupālavadha 2.94.

2) Having subordinate parts; chief, principal; ये रसस्या- ङ्गिनो धर्माः, एक एव भवेदङ्गी शृङ्गारो वीर एव वा, अङ्गी अत्र करुणः, रसस्याङ्गित्वमाप्तस्य धर्माः शौर्यादयो यथा (ye rasasyā- ṅgino dharmāḥ, eka eva bhavedaṅgī śṛṅgāro vīra eva vā, aṅgī atra karuṇaḥ, rasasyāṅgitvamāptasya dharmāḥ śauryādayo yathā) S. D.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Aṅgin (अङ्गिन्).—mfn. (-ṅgī-ṅginī-ṅgi) 1. Corporal. bodily. 2. Limbed, having limbs or members. 3. Chief, principal. E. aṅga and ini aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Aṅgin (अङ्गिन्).—i. e. aṅga + in, adj., f. . 1. Having limbs. 2. Having expedients. 3. Chief.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Aṅgin (अङ्गिन्).—[adjective] poss. to 3 aṅga; [masculine] [adjective] limbed or living creature.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Aṅgī (अङ्गी):—[from aṅga] a (for aṅga in [compound] with √1. kṛ and its derivatives).

2) b See 1. aṅga.

3) Āṅgī (आङ्गी):—[from āṅga] f. a princess of that country, [Mahābhārata i, 3772]

4) Āṅgi (आङ्गि):—[from āṅga] a m. a descendant of Aṅga, Name of Havirdhāna, [Ṛgveda-anukramaṇikā]

5) b āṅgika See āṅga.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Aṅgin (अङ्गिन्):—[from aṅga] mfn. having limbs, corporeal, having subordinate parts, principal

2) [v.s. ...] having expedients.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Goldstücker Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Aṅgin (अङ्गिन्):—m. f. n.

(-ṅgī-ṅginī-ṅgi) 1) Corporeal, bodily.

2) Limbed, having limbs or members.

3) Having means or expedients.

4) Chief, principal. E. aṅga, taddh. aff. ini.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Aṅgin (अङ्गिन्):—[(ṅgī-ṅginī-ṅgi) a.] Corporeal; limbed; chief, principal.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Aṅgin (अङ्गिन्) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Aṃgi.

[Sanskrit to German]

Angin in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Aṃgī (अंगी) [Also spelled angi]:—(a) primary, main, dominant; —[rasa] dominant emotion.

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Angi in Hindi refers in English to:—(a) primary, main, dominant; —[rasa] dominant emotion..—angi (अंगी) is alternatively transliterated as Aṃgī.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

Aṃgi (अंगि) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Aṅgin.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Aṃgi (ಅಂಗಿ):—

1) [adjective] having organs; organic.

2) [adjective] having subordinate limbs.

3) [adjective] principal, important, prominent.

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Aṃgi (ಅಂಗಿ):—

1) [noun] a man’s sleeved garments, with collars; a shirt.

2) [noun] a coat used as a defence against blow, stroke in a battle; a mail.

3) [noun] one who or that which, has organs or limbs;4) [noun] ಅಂಗಿಕೊಟ್ಟು ಭಂಗಿ ಸೇದು, ಭಂಗಿ ಸೇದಿ ಮಂಗನಾಗು [amgikottu bhamgi sedu, bhamgi sedi mamganagu] aŋgikoṭṭu bhaŋgi sēdu, bhaŋgi sēdi maŋganāgu (prov.) to satisfy a mean addiction, sell off one’s property; ಅಂಗಿ ಇಲ್ಲದಿದ್ದರೆ ನುಂಗಲಿಕ್ಕೆ ಬೇಡವೇ [amgi illadiddare numgalikke bedave]? aŋgi illadiddare nuŋgalikke bēḍave? (prov.) food is a more important necessity than clothing.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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