Anghri, Aṅghri, Amghri: 15 definitions

Introduction:

Anghri means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Wisdom Library: Raj Nighantu

Aṅghri (अङ्घ्रि) refers to the “root” of a tree, as mentioned in a list of five synonyms in the second chapter (dharaṇyādi-varga) of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu (an Ayurvedic encyclopedia). The Dharaṇyādi-varga covers the lands, soil, mountains, jungles and vegetation’s relations between trees [viz., Aṅghri] and plants and substances, with their various kinds.

Source: Shodhganga: Edition translation and critical study of yogasarasamgraha

Aṅghri (अङ्घ्रि) is another name for “Agnimantha” and is dealt with in the 15th-century Yogasārasaṅgraha (Yogasara-saṅgraha) by Vāsudeva: an unpublished Keralite work representing an Ayurvedic compendium of medicinal recipes. The Yogasārasaṃgraha [mentioning aṅghri] deals with entire recipes in the route of administration, and thus deals with the knowledge of pharmacy (bhaiṣajya-kalpanā) which is a branch of pharmacology (dravyaguṇa).

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Vastushastra (architecture)

Source: OpenEdition books: Architectural terms contained in Ajitāgama and Rauravāgama

Aṅghri (अङ्घ्रि) refers to “pillar, pilaster, level of pillars §§ 3.16; 4.6.”.—(For paragraphs cf. Les enseignements architecturaux de l'Ajitāgama et du Rauravāgama by Bruno Dagens)

Vastushastra book cover
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Vastushastra (वास्तुशास्त्र, vāstuśāstra) refers to the ancient Indian science (shastra) of architecture (vastu), dealing with topics such architecture, sculpture, town-building, fort building and various other constructions. Vastu also deals with the philosophy of the architectural relation with the cosmic universe.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Aṅghri (अङ्घ्रि) refers to the “feet”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.8.—Accordingly, as Brahmā narrated to Nārada:—“Once, induced by Śiva, you went to the abode of Himācala lovingly, you who have the knowledge of Śiva and who are the foremost among those who know the divine sports of Śiva. O sage Nārada, on seeing you, the lord of the mountains bowed to you and worshipped you. He called his daughter and asked her to fall at your feet [i.e., aṅghri]. O excellent sage, he bowed to you again. Himavat joined his palms in reverence and bent his head considering it his duty and spoke to you. [...]”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Aṅghri (अङ्घ्रि) refers to the “feet”, according to the Kubjikāmata-tantra, the earliest popular and most authoritative Tantra of the Kubjikā cult.—Accordingly, “[...] If one worships those feet (aṅghri-yuga), immobile on (one’s) head, as the form of the teacher, the (divine) qualities of realisation (manifest along) with the eight yogic powers and Śambhu’s plane. I have explained how the three are imperceptible to anyone who does not possess the Command.  [...]”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Aṅghri (अङ्घ्रि).—(aṃhriḥ) [aṅgh-krin nipāto'yam Uṇādi-sūtra 4.66.]

1) A foot.

2) The root of a tree. भुक्त्वोपविविशुः कामं स्निग्ध- च्छायाङ्घ्रिपाङ्घ्रिषु (bhuktvopaviviśuḥ kāmaṃ snigdha- cchāyāṅghripāṅghriṣu) Bhāgavata 1.82.12.

3) A quarter of a stanza (caturthapāda.)

4) A quarter of something; cf. दन्तद्वन्द्वप्रहीणादिकमिभवरमप्यङ्घ्रिमूल्येन गृह्यात् (dantadvandvaprahīṇādikamibhavaramapyaṅghrimūlyena gṛhyāt) | Mātaṇga L.7.2.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Aṅghri (अङ्घ्रि).—m.

(-ṅghriḥ) 1. A foot. 2. The root of a tree. E. hana to kill, and krin Unadi aff. the formative is irregular. See aṅghi.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Aṅghri (अङ्घ्रि).— (akin to jaṅghā from jaṅghan, the [frequentative.] of han; the initial consonant is lost, as e. g. in inakṣ for ninaskṣ and others, and n is changed to r, as in pīvar + ī fem. of pīvan), m. 1. A foot. 2. The root of a tree.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Aṅghri (अङ्घ्रि).—[masculine] foot, root; aṅghripaṭna [substantive] lotus-(like) foot.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Aṅghri (अङ्घ्रि):—[from aṅgh] m. a foot

2) [v.s. ...] foot of a seat

3) [v.s. ...] the root of a tree (cf. aṃhri).

4) [v.s. ...] division, branch, sphere, [Agni-purāṇa]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Goldstücker Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Aṅghri (अङ्घ्रि):—m. (according to some also n.)

(-ṅghriḥ-ṅghri) 1) A foot.

2) The root of a tree. E. aṅgh, uṇ. aff. krin. See also aṃhri, of which this word seems to be the fuller, original form. All words meaning ‘foot’ have also the meaning of ‘root of a tree’.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Aṅghri (अङ्घ्रि):—(ṅghriḥ) 2. m. A foot; root of a tree.

[Sanskrit to German]

Anghri in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Aṃghri (ಅಂಘ್ರಿ):—

1) [noun] that part of its body on which an animal stands or walks; the foot.

2) [noun] the part of a plant being underground, which absorbs water, salts in solution, and helps the plant to stand or get fixed to a point; root.

3) [noun] a line, as a division of a stanza in poetry; a foot.

4) [noun] fourth part of a whole.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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