Angarakshaka, aka: Aṅgarakṣaka, Anga-rakshaka; 3 Definition(s)

Introduction

Angarakshaka means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Aṅgarakṣaka can be transliterated into English as Angaraksaka or Angarakshaka, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Arthashastra (politics and welfare)

Angarakshaka in Arthashastra glossary... « previous · [A] · next »

Aṅgarakṣaka (अङ्गरक्षक, “bodyguard”) means a body guard or head of the body guards. Pedanīlli nāyaka was the aṅgarakṣaka of Śrī vākili of Kākatīya fort. An undated inscription from Tāḍuvai refers to Kaṇyāyuṇḍu, the aṅgarakṣaka of Rudremadevi.

Aṅgarakṣaka is an official title designating one of the seventy-two officers (niyoga) of the Bāhattaraniyogādhipati circle, according to the Inscriptional glossary of Andhra Pradesh (Śāsana-śabdakośāmu). The bāhattaraniyoga-adhipati is the highest executive officer of this circle (including a Aṅgarakṣaka). For example: During the reign of Gaṇapatideva, the area extending between Pānagal to Mārjavāḍi was entrusted to Gaṇḍapeṇḍāru Gangayasāhiṇi as Bāhattaraniyogādhipati. Later on, this office was entrusted to Kāyastha Jannigadeva.

Source: Shodhganga: Kakati Ganapatideva and his times (artha)
Arthashastra book cover
context information

Arthashastra (अर्थशास्त्र, arthaśāstra) literature concerns itself with the teachings (shastra) of economic prosperity (artha) statecraft, politics and military tactics. The term arthashastra refers to both the name of these scientific teachings, as well as the name of a Sanskrit work included in such literature. This book was written (3rd century BCE) by by Kautilya, who flourished in the 4th century BCE.

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India history and geogprahy

Angarakshaka in India history glossary... « previous · [A] · next »

Aṅgarakṣaka.—(IE 8-3; EI 15, 29; SITI), body-guard; the king's body-guard, or the head of the body guards. Note: aṅgarakṣaka is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

See also (synonyms): Aṅgarakṣa.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary
India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Angarakshaka in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [A] · next »

Aṅgarakṣaka (अङ्गरक्षक).—[aṅgaṃ rakṣati; rakṣ-ṇvul] a bodyguard, personal attendant Pt.3.

Derivable forms: aṅgarakṣakaḥ (अङ्गरक्षकः).

Aṅgarakṣaka is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms aṅga and rakṣaka (रक्षक).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 876 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Anga
Aṅga (अङ्ग).—(1) member, part (as in Sanskrit and Pali, where it is recorded as nt. only), m. ...
Khatvanga
Khaṭvāṅga (खट्वाङ्ग).—General Information. A King of the Ikṣvāku dynasty, known by the name Dil...
Vedanga
Vedāṅga (वेदाङ्ग) refers to a category of Apaurūṣeya texts, or “disciplines dealing with knowle...
Pancanga
Pañcāṅga (पञ्चाङ्ग).—see s.v. aṅga, and compare next.
Upanga
Upāṅga (उपाङ्ग) refers to the “subsidiary limbs” and represents one of the three types of Āṅgik...
Caturanga
Caturaṅga.—(EI 2), a complete army. Note: caturaṅga is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glos...
Angaja
Aṅgaja (अङ्गज).—mfn. (-jaḥ-jā-jaṃ) 1. Produced or born of the body. n. (-jaṃ) 1. Blood. 2. Love...
Navanga
Navāṅga (नवाङ्ग) refers the nine classifications of Buddhist scriptures, according to the 2nd c...
Lohitanga
Lohitāṅga (लोहिताङ्ग).—m. (-ṅgaḥ) The planet Mars. E. lohita, aṅga body.
Saptanga
Saptāṅga (सप्ताङ्ग).—mfn. (-ṅgaḥ-ṅgī-ṅgaṃ) Having seven members or parts. E. sapta, aṅga a part...
Varanga
Varāṅga (वराङ्ग).—adj. (Sanskrit vara-aṅga; in Sanskrit recorded as Bhvr. only in a gloss in Am...
Angagraha
Aṅgagraha (अङ्गग्रह).—m. (-haḥ) Bodily pain. E. aṅga, and graha what siezes.
Angahara
Aṅgahāra (अङ्गहार).—m. (-raḥ) Gesture, gesticulation. E. aṅga, and hāra taking, moving; also aṅ...
Anganyasa
Aṅganyāsa (अङ्गन्यास) refers to certain a ceremony to be performed during pūjā (ritualistic wor...
Pratyanga
Pratyaṅga (प्रत्यङ्ग) refers to the “minor limbs” and represents one of the three types of Āṅgi...

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