Anapana, Āṇāpana, Āṇāpāṇa, Ānāpāna, Anapāna: 7 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Anapana means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1a) Anapāna (अनपान).—See dadhivāhana.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 74. 102.

1b) The son of Aṅga and father of Diviratha.*

  • * Viṣṇu-purāṇa IV. 18. 15; Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 74. 103.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Dhamma Dana: Pali English Glossary

N Air entering and going out (while breathing).

context information

Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

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Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra

Ānāpāna (आनापान) refers to “the inbreath and the outbreath” according to the 2nd century Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra (chapter XVI).

In the inbreath and the outbreath (ānāpāna) there are also sixteen aspects:

  1. attention to the inbreath;
  2. attention to the outbreath;
  3. attention to the long breath and the short breath;
  4. knowledge that one is breathing in the entire body;
  5. knowledge that one is breathing while having eliminated the bodily factors;
  6. knowledge that one is breathing while experiencing joy;
  7. knowing that one is breathing while experiencing bliss;
  8. knowledge that one is breathing while feeling the mental factors;
  9. knowledge that one is breathing while gladdening the mind;
  10. knowledge that one is breathing while concentrating the mind;
  11. knowledge that one is breathing while liberating the mind;
  12. knowledge that one is breathing while contemplating impermanence;
  13. knowledge that one is breathing while contemplating disappearance;
  14. knowledge that one is breathing while contemplating renunciation of desire;
  15. knowledge that one is breathing while contemplating cessation;
  16. knowledge that one is breathingwhile contemplating renunciation.
Mahayana book cover
context information

Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous (A) next»] — Anapana in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

āṇāpana : (nt.) the act of commanding.

-- or --

āṇāpāṇa : (nt.) inhaled and exhaled breath.

-- or --

ānāpāna : (nt.) inhaled and exhaled breath.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Āṇāpana, (nt.) (abstr. fr. āṇāpeti) ordering or being, ordered, command, order PvA.135. (Page 97)

— or —

Ānāpāna, (nt.) (āna + apāna, cpds. of an to breathe) in haled & exhaled breath, inspiration & respiration S.V, 132, 311 sq.; J.I, 58; Ps.I, 162 (°kathā); usually in cpd. °sati concentration by in-breathing & out-breathing (cp. Man. of Mystic 70) M.I, 425 (cp. D.II, 291); III, 82; Vin.III, 70; A.I, 30; It.80; Ps.I, 166, 172, 185 (°samādhi); Nd2 466 B (id.); Miln.332; Vism.111, 197, 266 sq.; SnA 165. See detail under sati. (Page 100)

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Ānāpāna (आनापान).—(= Pali id.), breath (see below): °na-bhā-vanā-vidhiḥ Mahāvyutpatti 1165; °na-smṛti (= Pali °na-sati), mind- [Page096-b+ 71] fulness of breathing, Mahāvyutpatti 1166; Bodhisattvabhūmi 110.24; 204.26; 396.22; Udānavarga xv.1; °nānusmṛti, id., Śatasāhasrikā-prajñāpāramitā 60.8; on this and Śatasāhasrikā-prajñāpāramitā 1443.8 (where text ānāpā-nusmṛtir) see s.v. anusmṛti. The word is an old dvandva; āna (= prāṇa) plus apāna (compare Sanskrit prāṇāpāna, on which see G.W. Brown, JAOS 39.104 ff.). In Pali commentarial diction replaced by assāsa-passāsa (= āśvāsa-praśvāsa, q.v.). Tibetan on Mahāvyutpatti 1166 ānāpāna (-smṛtiḥ) renders dbugs rṅub pa daṅ ḥbyuṅ ba, breathing in and out; the same or related terms are used for āśvāsa and praśvāsa. It is clear that Tibetan understands āna = āśvāsa as inbreathing, apāna = pra- śvāsa as outbreathing. There is [Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit] evidence supporting this interpretation of āśvāsa-praśvāsa, q.v.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Anāpāna (अनापान):—[=an-āpāna] m. Name of a prince (son of Aṅga).

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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