Amra, aka: Āmra, Amrā; 13 Definition(s)

Introduction

Amra means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana

Āmra (आम्र).—The mango tree in Brahmasaras, in the shape of Brahmā; he who waters the tree will lead the Pitṛs to salvation.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 43. 6; 111. 35-36.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Dharmashastra (religious law)

Āmra (आम्र) is a Sanskrit word, identified with Mangifera indica (mango) by various scholars in their translation of the Śukranīti. This tree is mentioned as bearing good fruits. The King should plant such domestic plants in and near villages. He should nourish them by stoole of goats, sheep and cows, water as well as meat.

Amra (अम्र) is also mentioned in the same list, but identified with Spondias mangifera, which is a synonym of Spondias pinnata, also called “Pulicha kaai” in Tamil, which means “sour fruit”

The following is an ancient Indian recipe for such nourishment of trees:

According to Śukranīti 4.4.105-109: “The trees (such as āmra/amra) are to be watered in the morning and evening in summer, every alternate day in winter, in the fifth part of the day (i.e., afternoon) in spring, never in the rainy season. If trees have their fruits destroyed, the pouring of cold water after being cooked together with Kulutha, Māṣa (seeds), Mudga (pulse), Yava (barley) and Tila (oil seed) would lead to the growth of flowers and fruits. Growth of trees can be helped by the application of water with which fishes are washed and cleansed.”

Source: Wisdom Library: Dharma-śāstra
Dharmashastra book cover
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Dharmashastra (धर्मशास्त्र, dharmaśāstra) contains the instructions (shastra) regarding religious conduct of livelihood (dharma), ceremonies, jurisprudence (study of law) and more. It is categorized as smriti, an important and authoritative selection of books dealing with the Hindu lifestyle.

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Itihasa (narrative history)

Āmra (आम्र) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. II.48.23) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Āmra) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places
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Itihasa (इतिहास, itihāsa) refers to ‘epic history’ and represents a branch of Sanskrit literature which popularly includes 1) the eighteen major Puranas, 2) the Mahabharata and 3) the Ramayana. It is a branch of Vedic Hinduism categorised as smriti literature (‘that which is remembered’) as opposed to shruti literature (‘that which is transmitted verbally’).

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Āmra (आम्र) is the name of a tree (Āma) that is associated with the Nakṣatra (celestial star) named Pūrvā-Bhādrapadā, according to the second chapter (dharaṇyādi-varga) of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu (an Ayurvedic encyclopedia). Accordingly, “these [trees] are propounded in Śāstras, the secret scriptures (śāstrāgama). These pious trees [viz, Āmra], if grown and protected, promote long life”. These twenty-seven trees related to the twenty-seven Nakṣatras are supposed to be Deva-vṛkṣas or Nakṣatra-vṛkṣas.

Source: Wisdom Library: Raj Nighantu

Amrā (अम्रा) is another name for Indravāruṇī, a medicinal plant identified with Citrullus colocynthis (colocynth, bitter apple or desert gourd) from the Cucurbitaceae or “gourd family” of flowering plants, according to verse 3.70-72 of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu. The third chapter (guḍūcyādi-varga) of this book contains climbers and creepers (vīrudh). Together with the names Amrā and Indravāruṇī, there are a total of twenty-nine Sanskrit synonyms identified for this plant.

Source: WorldCat: Rāj nighaṇṭu
Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

1) Āmra (आम्र)—Sanskrit word for the “Mango”. This may be a plain synonym or may denote a different species of mangoes.

2) According to Śrīla Jīva Gosvāmī, the āmra is a mango tree (Śrīmad Bhāgavatam 10.30.9).

Source: Wisdom Library: Hinduism

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Āmra (आम्र) is the name of the caitya-tree under which the parents of Ara are often depicted in Jaina iconography, according to both the Śvetāmbara and Digambara tradition. The term caitya refers to “sacred shrine”, an important place of pelgrimage and meditation in Jainism. Sculptures with such caitya-trees generally shows a male and a female couple seated under a tree with the female having a child on her lap. Usually there is a seated Jina figure on top of the tree.

Ara is the eighteenth of twenty-four tīrthaṅkaras: enlightened beings who, having conquered saṃsāra (cycle of birth and death), leave a path behind for others to follow. His father is Sudarśana and his mother is Devī according to Śvetāmbara or Mitrā according to Digambara, according to the Ācāradinakara (14th century work on Jain conduct written by Vardhamāna Sūri).

Source: Wisdom Library: Jainism

1) Āmra (आम्र) refers to a kind of tree (vṛkṣa) commonly found in the forests (vaṇa) of ancient India, mentioned in the Jñātādharmakathāṅga-sūtra. Forests have been a significant part of the Indian economy since ancient days. They have been considered essential for economic development in as much as, besides bestowing many geographical advantages, they provide basic materials for building, furniture and various industries. The most important forest products are wood and timber which have been used by the mankind to fulfil his various needs—domestic, agricultural and industrial.

Different kinds of trees (eg., the Āmra tree) provided firewood and timber. The latter was used for furniture, building materials, enclosures, staircases, pillars, agricultural purposes, e. g. for making ploughs, transportation e. g. for making carts, chariots, boats, ships, and for various industrial needs. Vaṇa-kamma was an occupation dealing in wood and in various otherforest products. Iṅgāla-kamma was another occupation which was concerned with preparing charcoal from firewood.

2) Āmra (आम्र) refers to the “mango” (Mangifera Indica): a type of fruit (phala), according to Jain canonical texts (eg., the Jñātādharmakathāṅga-sūtra from the 3rd century B.C.). It is also known by the name Rasāla and Aṃba. Various kinds of fruits were grown and consumed by the people in ancient India. Fruits were also dried up for preservation. Koṭṭaka was a place for this operation. Besides being grown in orchards, fruits were gathered from jungles and were carried to cities for sales.

The Jain canonical texts frequently mention different horticulture products viz. fruits (eg., Āmra fruit), vegetables and flowers which depict that horticulture was a popular pursuit of the people at that time. Gardens and parks (ārāma, ujjāṇa or nijjāṇa) were full of fruits and flowers of various kinds which besides yielding their products provided a calm and quiet place where people could enjoy the natural surroundings.

Source: archive.org: Economic Life In Ancient India (as depicted in Jain canonical literature)

Āmra (आम्र) refers to “touch / proximity” and represents one of the eight types of extraordinary healing (auṣadhi), which itself is a subclass of the eight ṛddhis (extraordinary powers). These powers can be obtained by the Ārya (civilized people) in order to produce worldly miracles. The Āryas represent one of the two classes of human beings according to the 2nd-century Tattvārthasūtra 3.46, the other being Mleccha (barbarians).

What is meant by extraordinary power to heal by touch or proximity (āmra-riddhi)? It is the extraordinary power of the ascetic so that his proximity or just the words cure the patient of all his sickness.

Source: Encyclopedia of Jainism: Tattvartha Sutra 3: The Lower and middle worlds
General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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India history and geogprahy

Amra is the name of a tree mentioned in the Kathasaritsagara by Somadeva (10th century A.D).—Amra refers to the “Mango-tree” and a bower of mango-` trees is mentioned.

Somadeva mentions many rich forests, gardens, various trees (eg., Amra), creepers medicinal and flowering plants and fruit-bearing trees in the Kathasaritsagara. Travel through the thick, high, impregnable and extensive Vindhya forest is a typical feature of many travel-stories. Somadeva’s writing more or less reflects the life of the people of Northern India during the 11th century. His Kathasaritsagara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Amra, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravahanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyadharas (celestial beings).

Source: Shodhganga: Cultural history as g leaned from kathasaritsagara
India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

āmra (आम्र).—m (S) The mango-tree and fruit, Mangifera Indica.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

āmra (आम्र).—m The mango-tree and fruit.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
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Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Amra (अम्र).—= आम्र (āmra) q. v.

--- OR ---

Āmra (आम्र).—[am gatyādiṣu ran dīrghaśca Uṇ.2.16.] The mango tree.

-mram The fruit of the mango tree.

Derivable forms: āmraḥ (आम्रः).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 32 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Amrapali
Āmrapālī (आम्रपाली).—f. Name of a prostitute famous for her beauty. Āmrapālī is a Sanskrit comp...
Amravana
Āmravaṇa (आम्रवण).—[āmrasya vanam cf. P.VIII.4.5.] a grove of mango trees; सोऽहमाम्रवणं छित्त्व...
Kalamra
Kālāmra (कालाम्र).—See under BHADRAŚĀLA.
S-amra-madhu-vana
S-āmra-madhu-vana.—(EI 12), same as s-āmra-madhū-vana-akīrṇa. Note: s-āmra-madhu-vana is define...
S-amra-madhu-vana-akirna
S-āmra-madhu-vana-akīrṇa.—see Ind. Ep., p. 402. Note: s-āmra-madhu-vana-akīrṇa is defined in th...
Sa-sarv-ashan-ekshu-karpasa-shana-amra-madhuka-adi-bhuruha
Sa-sarv-āśan-ekṣu-karpāsa-śaṇa-amra-madhūka-ādi-bhūruha.—‘to- gether with aśana (pītaśāla), sug...
Amragandhaka
Āmragandhaka (आम्रगन्धक).—Name of a plant (samaṣṭhilavṛkṣa; Mar. suraṇa). Derivable forms: āmra...
Rajamra
Rājāmra (राजाम्र).—a superior kind of mango. Derivable forms: rājāmraḥ (राजाम्रः).Rājāmra is a ...
Amrasthi
Āmrāsthi (आम्रास्थि).—The seed of the mango tree. Āmrāsthi is a Sanskrit compound consisting of...
Amrapeshi
Āmrapeśī (आम्रपेशी).—[āmrasya peśīva] a portion of dried mango fruit. Āmrapeśī is a Sanskrit co...
Amraphalaprapanaka
Āmraphalaprapāṇaka (आम्रफलप्रपाणक).—A cooling drink made of mangoes. Derivable forms: āmraphala...
Dugdhamra
Dugdhāmra (दुग्धाम्र).—the skim of milk, cream. Derivable forms: dugdhāmram (दुग्धाम्रम्).Dugdh...
Amrapancama
Āmrapañcama (आम्रपञ्चम).—A particular Rāga in music. Derivable forms: āmrapañcamaḥ (आम्रपञ्चमः)...
Amrakuta
Āmrakūṭa (आम्रकूट).—Name of a mountain; सानुमानाम्रकूटः (sānumānāmrakūṭaḥ) Me.17. Derivable for...
Madhvamra
Madhvāmra (मध्वाम्र).—a kind of mango tree. Derivable forms: madhvāmraḥ (मध्वाम्रः).Madhvāmra i...

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