Amla, Amlā, Āmlā: 19 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Amla means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Aml.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany

Amlā (अम्ला) is another name (synonym) for Ciñcā, which is a Sanskrit name for the plant Tamarindus indica (tamarind). This synonym was identified by Narahari in his 13th-century Rājanighaṇṭu (verses 12.162-164), which is an Ayurvedic medicinal thesaurus.

Source: archive.org: Sushruta samhita, Volume I

Amla (acid) is  taste which produces tooth-edge and increased salivation, and increases the relish for food. An acid taste is pre-eminently possessed of attributes, which belong to the elementary principles of earth (bhumi or pṛthivī) and fire (agni or dahana). The pungent, acid (amla) and saline ones exercise fiery or heat making virtues. The tastes such as sweet, acid (amla) and saline are heavy and emollient in their character. Tastes such as sweet, acid (amla) and saline are endued with the virtues of subduing Vayu.

Virtue of Amla—An acid taste should be regarded as a digestant of assimilated food, and is endued with resolving, appetising and carminative properties. It sets in the natural emission of flatus and urine, restores the natural movements of the bowels, lessens the tendency to spasms, and gives rise to an acid (digestive) reaction in the stomach, and to a sensation of external shivering. It originates a slimy or mucous secretion and is extremely pleasant or relishing.

An acid taste (amla-rasa), though possessed of the aforesaid virtues, brings on tooth-edge, with sudden closing of the eyes, appearance of goose flesh on the skin, absorption of Kapha and looseness of the body in the event of its being largely partaken of to the exclusion of all other tastes. Owing to its fiery character, the taste under discussion sets in a process of suppuration in cuts or burns, or in incised, lacerated or punctured wounds, as well as in those, which result from external blows, or are due to fractures, swellings, or falls, or are brought about as the after effects of any idiopathic distemper, or which are tainted with the urine of any venomous animals or through contact with any poisonous animal or vermin. It gives rise to a burning sensation in the throat, chest and the region of the heart.

Source: Shodhganga: Dietetics and culinary art in ancient and medieval India

Amla (अम्ल) refers to one of the five types of “curds” (dadhi) according to the 17th century Bhojanakutūhala (dravyaguṇāguṇa-kathana), and is commonly found in literature dealing with the topics of dietetics and culinary art, also known as Pākaśāstra or Pākakalā.—In dadhi-prakaraṇa, author classifies the curds into five types [viz., Amla] depending on their stages of fermentaion as well as taste.

Source: gurumukhi.ru: Ayurveda glossary of terms

1) Amla (अम्ल):—Acids medium used for various processes including purification etc

2) Sour; One among six Rasa;

Source: WorldCat: Rāj nighaṇṭu

Amlā (अम्ला) is another name for Kṣudrāmlikā, a medicinal plant identified with Oxalis corniculata Linn. or “creeping woodsorrel” from the Oxalidaceae or “wood sorrel” family of flowering plants, according to verse 5.100-102 of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu. The fifth chapter (parpaṭādi-varga) of this book enumerates sixty varieties of smaller plants (kṣudra-kṣupa). Together with the names Amlā and Kṣudrāmlikā, there are a total of fifteen Sanskrit synonyms identified for this plant.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

Source: Health Beckon: 45 Amazing Benefits Of Indian Gooseberry

The word “amla is derived from the Sanskrit word “amlaki”, which means “the sustainer” or prosperity. The fruit belongs to the Euphorbiaceae family. Amla is considered as one of the most popular herbs for improving our health and well-being. It is a major part of the Triphala Churna, which is a combination of three potent herbs. According to Ayurveda, regular consumption of amla balances all three doshas of the body- Vata, Pitta and Kapha. In ancient Ayurveda, amla was used for promoting longevity, digestion, for enhancing concentration and alleviating respiratory problems.

In Buddhism

General definition (in Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Dharma-samgraha

Amla (अम्ल, “sour”) refers to one of the “six kinds of tastes” (rasa) as defined in the Dharma-saṃgraha (section 36). The Dharma-samgraha (Dharmasangraha) is an extensive glossary of Buddhist technical terms in Sanskrit (e.g., amla). The work is attributed to Nagarjuna who lived around the 2nd century A.D.

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: Encyclopedia of Jainism: Tattvartha Sutra 8: Bondage of karmas

Amla (अम्ल, “sour”) refers to one of the five types of Rasa (taste) which represents one of the various kinds of Nāma, or “physique-making (karmas)”, which represents one of the eight types of Prakṛti-bandha (species bondage): one of the four kinds of bondage (bandha) according to the 2nd-century Tattvārthasūtra chapter 8. The karmas rise of which gives the taste attribute to the body are called taste body-making karma (e.g., amla).

General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

āmla (आम्ल).—n S An acid drug or medicament. Five specific ones are reckoned; viz. hyāḷuṅga, nimbūṃ, nāriṅga, ciñca, avaḷā.

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āmla (आम्ल).—a (S) Sour or acid.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

amla (अम्ल).—a Sour or acid.

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āmla (आम्ल).—a Sour or acid. n An acid drug.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Amla (अम्ल).—a. [am-kla Uṇ.4.18.] Sour, acid; कट्वम्ललवणात्युष्णतीक्ष्णरूक्षविदाहिनः (kaṭvamlalavaṇātyuṣṇatīkṣṇarūkṣavidāhinaḥ) (āhārāḥ) Bg.17.9.

-mlaḥ 1 Sourness, acidity, one of the six kinds of tastes or rasas q. v. यो दन्तहर्षमुत्पादयति मुखास्रावं जनयति श्रद्धां चोत्पादयति सोऽम्लः (yo dantaharṣamutpādayati mukhāsrāvaṃ janayati śraddhāṃ cotpādayati so'mlaḥ) (rasaḥ) Suśr.

2) Vinegar.

3) Wood-sorrel.

4) = अम्ल- वेतस (amla- vetasa) q. v.

5) The common citron tree.

6) Belch.

-mlī = चाङ्गेरी (cāṅgerī).

-mlam Sour curds, butter-milk, with a fourth part of water.

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Amla (अम्ल).—Sourness.

Derivable forms: amlaḥ (अम्लः).

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Āmla (आम्ल) or Āmlā (आम्ला).—The tamarind tree.

-mlam Sourness, acidity.

-pañcakam The aggregate of the five following Ziziphus Jujuba (Mar. bora), Pomegranate (Mar. ḍāḷiṃba), Mangosteen (Mar. kokaṃba), Tamarind (Mar. ciṃca), Averrhoa Carambola (Mar. karamara).

-vetasaḥ Name of the plant Rumex Vesicarius (Mar. cukā).

Derivable forms: āmlaḥ (आम्लः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Amla (अम्ल).—mfn.

(-mlaḥ-mlā-mlaṃ) Sour, acid. m.

(-mlaḥ) Sourness, acidity. f. (-mlī) Wood sorrel, (Oxalis monadelpha.) n.

(-mlaṃ) Sour curds. E. ama to be sick, kla Unadi affix, and ṅīp for the fem.

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Āmla (आम्ल).—mfn.

(-mlaḥ-mlā-mlaṃ) The tamarind tree. n.

(-mlaṃ) Lourness, acidity. E. amla sour, with āṅ prefixed, or amla sour and aṇ aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Amla (अम्ल).—m. Sourness, [Rāmāyaṇa] 5, 14, 45; [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 5, 114 (acids). Perhaps from vb. am.

— Cf. [Latin] ăm + ārus.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Amla (अम्ल).—[adjective] sour, acid; [masculine] wood-sorrel.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Amla (अम्ल):—mfn. sour, acid, [Manu-smṛti v, 114, etc.]

2) m. (with or without rasa) acidity, vinegar, [Suśruta], wood sorrel (Oxalis Corniculata), [Suśruta]

3) mn. sour curds, [Suśruta]

4) Āmla (आम्ल):—mf. ([from] amla), the tamarind tree, Tamarindus Indica, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) n. sourness, acidity, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Amla (अम्ल):—(mlaḥ) 1. m. Acidity. (mlī) 3. f. Wood-sorrel. (mlaṃ) 1. n. Sour curds. (mlaḥ-mlā-mlaṃ) 1. a. Sour.

2) Āmla (आम्ल):—[(mlaḥ-mlī-mlaṃ)] 1. m. n. 3. f. The tamarind tree. n. Sourness.

[Sanskrit to German] (Deutsch Wörterbuch)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Böhtlingk and Roth Grosses Petersburger Wörterbuch

Amla (अम्ल):—[Die Uṇādi-Affixe 4, 110.]

1) adj. sauer, m. Säure (abstr.) gaṇa arśaādi; [Amarakoṣa 1, 1, 4, 18. 3, 4, 14, 85.] [Hemacandra’s Abhidhānacintāmaṇi 1388.] [Anekārthasaṃgraha 2, 474.] [Medinīkoṣa l. 2.] śaucaṃ (verschiedener Metalle) yathārhaṃ kartavyaṃ kṣārāmlodakavāribhiḥ [Manu’s Gesetzbuch 5, 114.] [Yājñavalkya’s Gesetzbuch 1, 190.] kaṭvamlalavaṇātyuṣṇatīkṣṇarūkṣavidāhinaḥ . āhārāḥ [Bhagavadgītā 17, 9.] amlalavaṇopetaiḥ māṃsaiḥ [Rāmāyaṇa 5, 14, 45.] eine der sechs Modificationen des Geschmacks (rasa): yo dantaharṣamutpādayati mukhāsrāvaṃ janayati śraddhāṃ cotpādayati so mlaḥ (rasaḥ) [Suśruta 1, 155, 2.] Die Verbindungen dieses Geschmacks mit andern [2, 543. fgg.] die Zusammenstellung der Stoffe, welche ihn erregen (amlavarga .) [1, 157, 4.] takramamlamanamlaṃ vā [2, 50, 1.] —

2) m. Säure, durch Gährung sauer Gewordenes, Essig u.s.w.: arkāṅkurānamlapiṣṭān [Suśruta 2, 365, 11.] Vgl. dhānyāmla, vṛkṣāmla . —

3) m. (?) Oxalis corniculata, Sauerklee [Suśruta 2, 453, 11.] —

4) m. = amlavetasa [Hemacandra’s Anekārthasaṃgraha 2, 474.] [Rājanirghaṇṭa im Śabdakalpadruma] —

5) f. amlī Oxalis corniculata (cāṅgerī) [Hemacandra’s Anekārthasaṃgraha 2, 474.] [Medinīkoṣa l. 2.] —

6) n. Buttermilch (takra) [Rājanirghaṇṭa im Śabdakalpadruma] Vgl. u. 1. am Ende. — Vgl. amba, ambla .

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Āmla (आम्ल):—(von amla) m. f. (ā) n. Tamarindus indica [Śabdaratnāvalī im Śabdakalpadruma] eine andere Pflanze (śrīvallī) [Rājanirghaṇṭa im Śabdakalpadruma]

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Amla (अम्ल):—

1) ist ursprünglich adj.; zu der abstr. Bed. Säure ist rasa zu ergänzen. —

2) tāmramamlena śudhyati [Spr. 4657.] — Vgl. mahāmla .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Sanskrit-Wörterbuch in kürzerer Fassung

Amla (अम्ल):——

1) Adj. sauer.

2) m. Sauerklee und *Sauerampfer.

3) f. ī Sauerklee.

4) n. Buttermilch [Suśruta (rotrh) 2,365,11.]

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Āmla (आम्ल):—m. f. ā und n. Tamarindus indica und = śrīvallī.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

1) Amla in Hindi refers in English to:—(nm) staff; paraphernalia..—amla (अमला) is alternatively transliterated as Amalā.

2) Amla (अम्ल) [Also spelled aml]:—(nm) acid; (a) sour; ~[] acidity; sourness.

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