Amari, Amarī, Āmari: 15 definitions

Introduction:

Amari means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Jainism, Prakrit, biology, Tamil. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Nighantu (Synonyms and Characteristics of Drugs and technical terms)

Source: WorldCat: Rāj nighaṇṭu

Amarī (अमरी) is another name for Mūrvā, a medicinal plant identified with Marsdenia tenacissima from the Asclepiadoideae or “milkweed family” of flowering plants, according to verse 3.19-21 of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu. The third chapter (guḍūcyādi-varga) of this book contains climbers and creepers (vīrudh). Together with the names Amarī and Mūrvā, there are a total of twenty-eight Sanskrit synonyms identified for this plant.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Amarī (अमरी) or Amarikā is the name of a Goddess and clan (gotra), according to the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, “(Kubjikā’s) iconic form is threefold (according to whether it is) in (the transmission) of the Child, Middle One or the Aged. [...] The descent (to earth), associated with the three Vidyās, of the lineages (oli) takes place in each Age in this Clan (gotra) and in that of Amarī and the others in the teaching. O god, Parā, the one syllable Vidyā, has been explained previously, (even so) I will explain that properly (and) the very subtle, imperishable goal. [...]”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions

Amarī (अमरी) refers to a type of miraculous fluid, according to the 13th-century Matsyendrasaṃhitā: a Kubjikā-Tripurā oriented Tantric Yoga text of the Ṣaḍanvayaśāmbhava tradition from South India.—[...] (Cf. Śivatīrtha)—Verse 40.18 names the miraculous fluid as amarī, a term echoed in Matsyendrasaṃhitā 27.5 as amarīrasa. That chapter, Matsyendrasaṃhitā 27, teaches concoctions of herbs and physical secrations such as faeces, urine, menstrual blood, phlegm (?) and semen (?) (viṅ-mūtra-rajo-recaka-sāraka) associated with Lokeśa, Keśava, Rudra, Īśa and Sadeśvara, respectively (27.2). In Matsyendrasaṃhitā 27.5a Sadāśiva (i.e. probably Sadeśvara, or rather the substance associated with him, probably semen) is said to be the best among them. This may indicate that the meaning of amarī (and sudhā, amṛta etc.) is flexible; it may refer not only to urine, but to other bodily fluids as well. Amarī should be drunk after reciting the appropriate mantra and should be massaged on one’s body (27.21–26ab), similarly to what is taught in Matsyendrasaṃhitā 40.64–65, where it is clearly semen.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Yoga (school of philosophy)

Source: ORA: Amanaska (king of all yogas): A Critical Edition and Annotated Translation by Jason Birch

Amarī (अमरी) refers to a particular flow of water, according to the Haṭhapradīpikā 3.96-98.—Accordingly, “Having discarded the first flow of water because of its excessive heat and the last flow because it is worthless, [the Yogin] should use the middle flow [which is] cool. In the Khaṇḍakāpālika sect, this is [called] Amarolī. If he regularly drinks the [middle flow called] Amarī; snorts [it] everyday and correctly practices Vajrolī Mudrā [in order to draw it up his urethra], it is called Amarolī. He should mix the lunar fluid which is emitted because of [this] practice, with ashes and [then,] put it on the upper body (i.e., the head, eyes, shoulders, throat, chest, arms and so on). [As a result], divine sight arises”.

Yoga book cover
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Yoga is originally considered a branch of Hindu philosophy (astika), but both ancient and modern Yoga combine the physical, mental and spiritual. Yoga teaches various physical techniques also known as āsanas (postures), used for various purposes (eg., meditation, contemplation, relaxation).

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India history and geography

Source: Shodhganga: Deforestation in Nagaland: a historical perspective

Amari is the name of a plant corresponding to Amoora wallichi, according to the author Lanukumla Ao in his thesis “Deforestation in Nagaland”, mentioning the source: Annual Administrative Report 2012-2013.

Source: Shodhganga: Studies on ecological and behavioural aspects of capped langur, Trachypithecus pileatus

Amari is the name of a plant corresponding to Amoora wallichii King. from the Meliaceae family, according to the author Awadhesh Kumar in his thesis called ‘Studies on ecological and behavioural aspects of capped langur’, mentioned in the chapter dealing with Food habits and feeding ecology. The following parts of Amari are consumed: Young leaves

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as mythology, zoology, royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Biology (plants and animals)

Source: Wisdom Library: Local Names of Plants and Drugs

Amari [आमरी] in the Hindi language is the name of a plant identified with Antidesma acidum Retz. from the Phyllanthaceae (Amla) family having the following synonyms: Antidesma lanceolarium, Antidesma wallichianum, Stilago diandra. For the possible medicinal usage of amari, you can check this page for potential sources and references, although be aware that any some or none of the side-effects may not be mentioned here, wether they be harmful or beneficial to health.

Amari [അമരി] in the Malayalam language is the name of a plant identified with Indigofera tinctoria L. from the Fabaceae (Pea) family having the following synonyms: Indigofera indica Lam., Indigofera sumatrana.

Source: Google Books: CRC World Dictionary (Regional names)

1) Amari in India is the name of a plant defined with Aloe vera in various botanical sources. This page contains potential references in Ayurveda, modern medicine, and other folk traditions or local practices It has the synonym Aloe vera var. littoralis J. König ex Baker (among others).

2) Amari is also identified with Anodendron paniculatum It has the synonym Echites polyanthus Wall., nom. inval. (etc.).

3) Amari is also identified with Indigofera tinctoria It has the synonym Indigofera tinctoria Chapm. (etc.).

Example references for further research on medicinal uses or toxicity (see latin names for full list):

· Revisio Generum Plantarum (1891)
· Flora of the British India (1882)
· Flora Aegyptiaco-Arabica (1775)
· Fl. Mesoamer. (1994)
· Flora of Jamaica containing descriptions of the flowering plants known from the island (1920)
· Histoire Naturelle des Îles Canaries (1848)

If you are looking for specific details regarding Amari, for example extract dosage, pregnancy safety, health benefits, diet and recipes, chemical composition, side effects, have a look at these references.

Biology book cover
context information

This sections includes definitions from the five kingdoms of living things: Animals, Plants, Fungi, Protists and Monera. It will include both the official binomial nomenclature (scientific names usually in Latin) as well as regional spellings and variants.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Amarī (अमरी).—A goddess; अमरीकबरीभारभ्रमरीमुखरीकृतम् (amarīkabarībhārabhramarīmukharīkṛtam) Kuval.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Amarī (अमरी):—[=a-marī] [from a-mara > a-mamri] f. the plant Sanseviera Roxburghiana, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

2) [from a-mara > a-mamri] a goddess, [Hemacandra’s Pariśiṣṭaparvan]

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Amarī (अमरी) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Amarī, Amāri.

[Sanskrit to German]

Amari in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

1) Amarī (अमरी) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Amarī.

2) Amāri (अमारि) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Amāri.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Amari (ಅಮರಿ):—[noun] the plant Cassia angustifolia of Caesalpiiaceae family; Indian senna.

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Amari (ಅಮರಿ):—[noun] = ಅಮರವಧು [amaravadhu].

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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Tamil dictionary

Source: DDSA: University of Madras: Tamil Lexicon

Amari (அமரி) noun probably from அமர்-. [amar-.] Urine; சிறு நீர். (பிங்கலகண்டு) [siru nir. (pingalagandu)]

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Amari (அமரி) noun < samara. Durgā, as a war goddess; துர்க்கை. (பிங்கலகண்டு) [thurkkai. (pingalagandu)]

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Amari (அமரி) noun cf. kumārī. See கற்றாழை. (வைத்திய மலையகராதி) [karrazhai. (vaithiya malaiyagarathi)]

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Amari (அமரி) noun < amara. Ambrosia, as food of gods; அமிர்தம். அமரி வவ்வி [amirtham. amari vavvi] (சேதுபுராணம் கத்துரு. [sethupuranam kathuru.] 28).

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Āmari (ஆமரி) noun Word; சொல். (அகராதி நிகண்டு) [sol. (agarathi nigandu)]

context information

Tamil is an ancient language of India from the Dravidian family spoken by roughly 250 million people mainly in southern India and Sri Lanka.

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