Amari, Amarī: 6 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Amari means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: WorldCat: Rāj nighaṇṭu

Amarī (अमरी) is another name for Mūrvā, a medicinal plant identified with Marsdenia tenacissima from the Asclepiadoideae or “milkweed family” of flowering plants, according to verse 3.19-21 of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu. The third chapter (guḍūcyādi-varga) of this book contains climbers and creepers (vīrudh). Together with the names Amarī and Mūrvā, there are a total of twenty-eight Sanskrit synonyms identified for this plant.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

Discover the meaning of amari in the context of Ayurveda from relevant books on Exotic India

India history and geography

Source: Shodhganga: Deforestation in Nagaland: a historical perspective

Amari is the name of a plant corresponding to Amoora wallichi, according to the author Lanukumla Ao in his thesis “Deforestation in Nagaland”, mentioning the source: Annual Administrative Report 2012-2013.

Source: Shodhganga: Studies on ecological and behavioural aspects of capped langur, Trachypithecus pileatus

Amari is the name of a plant corresponding to Amoora wallichii King. from the Meliaceae family, according to the author Awadhesh Kumar in his thesis called ‘Studies on ecological and behavioural aspects of capped langur’, mentioned in the chapter dealing with Food habits and feeding ecology. The following parts of Amari are consumed: Young leaves

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

Discover the meaning of amari in the context of India history from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Amarī (अमरी).—A goddess; अमरीकबरीभारभ्रमरीमुखरीकृतम् (amarīkabarībhārabhramarīmukharīkṛtam) Kuval.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Amarī (अमरी):—[=a-marī] [from a-mara > a-mamri] f. the plant Sanseviera Roxburghiana, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

2) [from a-mara > a-mamri] a goddess, [Hemacandra’s Pariśiṣṭaparvan]

[Sanskrit to German] (Deutsch Wörterbuch)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Sanskrit-Wörterbuch in kürzerer Fassung

Amarī (अमरी):—Adv. mit bhū unsterblich werden , So v.a. in den Himmel kommen , im Heldenkampfe fallen [Bālarāmāyaṇa 73,13.]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of amari in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

See also (Relevant definitions)

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: