Amareshvara, Amareśvara, Amara-ishvara: 11 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Amareshvara means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Amareśvara can be transliterated into English as Amaresvara or Amareshvara, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Amareshvara in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

1) Amareśvara (अमरेश्वर) refers to one of twelve Jyotirliṅgas, according to the Śivapurāṇa 1.22 while explaining the importance of the partaking of the Naivedya of Śiva. Amareśvara is located at Ujjain.

2) Amareśvara (अमरेश्वर) refers to the “lord of Devas”, and is used as an epithet for Śiva, as mentioned in the Mahāmṛtyuñjaya-mantra, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.2.38.—Accordingly, as Śukra related the Mahāmṛtyuñjaya to Dadhīca:—“We worship the three-eyed lord Śiva, the lord of the three worlds, the father of the three spheres, the lord of the three guṇas. Lord Śiva is the essence, the fragrance of the three tattvas, three fires, of every thing that is trichotomised, of the three worlds, of the three arms and of the trinity. He is the nourisher. In all living beings, everywhere, in the three guṇas, in the creation, in the sense-organs, in the Devas and Gaṇas, he is the essence as the fragrance in a flower. He is the lord of Devas (amareśvara). [...]”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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India history and geography

Source: archive.org: Nilamata Purana: a cultural and literary study (history)

Amareśvara (अमरेश्वर) is the name of a tīrtha (sacred place) as mentioned in the Nīlamatapurāṇa.—Amareśvara is the tīrtha on the snowy peaks of Amaranātha.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Amareshvara in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Amareśvara (अमरेश्वर).—&c. 'The lord of the gods', epithets of Indra; प्रेमदत्तवदना- निलः पिवन्नत्यजीवदमरालकेश्वरौ (premadattavadanā- nilaḥ pivannatyajīvadamarālakeśvarau) R.19.15. शान्तं पापं न वः किंचित् कुतश्चिदमराधिप (śāntaṃ pāpaṃ na vaḥ kiṃcit kutaścidamarādhipa) Rām.2.74.22. sometimes of Śiva and Viṣṇu also,

Derivable forms: amareśvaraḥ (अमरेश्वरः).

Amareśvara is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms amara and īśvara (ईश्वर). See also (synonyms): amarādhipa, amarendra, amareśa, amarapati, amarabhartā, amararāja.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Amareśvara (अमरेश्वर).—m.

(-raḥ) Indra. E. amara, and īśvara chief.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Amareśvara (अमरेश्वर).—m. a name of Viṣṇu, [Rāmāyaṇa] 1, 77, 29; of Indra, [Raghuvaṃśa, (ed. Stenzler.)] 19, 15.

Amareśvara is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms amara and īśvara (ईश्वर).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Amareśvara (अमरेश्वर).—[masculine] lord of the gods, [Epithet] of Śiva, Viṣṇu, or Indra.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Aufrecht Catalogus Catalogorum

Amareśvara (अमरेश्वर) as mentioned in Aufrecht’s Catalogus Catalogorum:—Śivārcanapaddhati. K. 52.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Amareśvara (अमरेश्वर):—[from a-mara > a-mamri] m. = amara-pa q.v., [Śākaṭāyana; Raghuvaṃśa xix, 15]

2) [v.s. ...] Name of Viṣṇu, [Rāmāyaṇa i, 77, 29]

3) [v.s. ...] Name of a Liṅga.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Amareśvara (अमरेश्वर):—[a-mare+śvara] < [a-mareśvara] (raḥ) 1. m. Idem.

[Sanskrit to German]

Amareshvara in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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