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Amaravati, aka: Amarāvati, Amarāvatī, Amaravatī; 11 Definition(s)

Introduction

Amaravati means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Śaivism (Śaiva philosophy)

Amarāvatī (अमरावती) refers to the city of Indra, situated on the eastern lower slope of mount Meru, according to Parākhyatantra 5.66. Meru is the name of a golden mountained situated in the middle of nine landmasses (navakhaṇḍa): Bhārata, Hari, Kimpuruṣa, Ramyaka, Ramaṇa, Kuru, Bhadrāśva, Ketumāla and Ilāvṛta. Together these khaṇḍas make up the continent known as Jambūdvīpa.

Amarāvatī is also known by the name Amara and is mentioned in various other sources, eg., the Svacchanda-tantra 10.132-136, Kiraṇa-āgama 8.51-54, Mṛgendra-āgama vidyāpāda 13.47-54, Sarvajñānottara-tantra adhvaprakaraṇa 34-36 and Mataṅga-āgama vidyāpāda 23.60-63

The Parākhyatantra is an old Śaiva-siddhānta tantra dating from before the 10th century.

Source: Wisdom Library: ŚaivismŚaivism book cover
context information

Śaiva (शैव, shaiva) or Śaivism (shaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshipping Śiva as the supreme being. Closeley related to Śāktism, Śaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

Purāṇa

Amarāvatī (अमरावती) is the city city of Indra, guardian (dikpāla) of the eastern direction, according to the Varāhapurāṇa chapter 76.

The Varāhapurāṇa is categorised as a Mahāpurāṇa, and was originally composed of 24,000 metrical verses, possibly originating from before the 10th century. It is composed of two parts and Sūta is the main narrator.

Source: Wisdom Library: Varāha-purāṇa

Amarāvatī (अमरावती).—Heaven noted for the pleasure-park Nandana. A description of the city, occupied for some time by Bali.1 Though it was really the capital of Indra, the latter says that it belonged to Kṛṣṇa.2 When it is midday here, the sun rises at Samyamana.3

  • 1) Bhāgavata-purāṇa VIII. 15. 11-22 and 33; Vāyu-purāṇa 77. 26.
  • 2) Bhāgavata-purāṇa X. [67 (V) 26]; Viṣṇu-purāṇa I. 9. 25.
  • 3) Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 21. 37; III. 13. 26 and 30; Matsya-purāṇa 124. 27.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana IndexPurāṇa book cover
context information

The Purāṇas (पुराण, purana) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahāpurāṇas total over 400,000 ślokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

General definition (in Hinduism)

Amarāvati (अमरावति, “immortality”):—The name of the city where Indira resides. Indra is the king of the gods. He is the ruler of the storm and represents the all-pervading electric energy. As a major deity in the Ṛg-veda, he also represents the cause of fertility.

Source: Wisdom Library: Hinduism

Amarāvati (अमरावती): The city of Indra

Source: WikiPedia: Hinduism

Amarāvatī (अमरावती).—The capital city of Lord Indra's heavenly abode. It has the power of greatly extending the life span of its residents.

Source: ISKCON Press: Glossary

In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

1. Amaravati - Also called Amara. A city in the time of Dipankara Buddha. Sumedha was born there in a very rich family and renounced the world after having given his wealth away (Bu.ii.5; J.i.6; DhA.i.83, etc.). According to the Mahabodhivamsa (p.2) the city was so called because it was inhabited by men like gods.

2. Amaravati - A city in the time of Kondanna Buddha eighteen leagues in extent. It was in the Devavana, near the city, that Kondanna preached his first sermon (v.l. Arundhavati). BuA.108-9.

3. Amaravati - The city of Sakka, king of the gods. Sp.i.49; Cv.lxxx.5; it is described in the Mahabharata iii.1714ff.; see also Hopkins, Epic Mythology, 140f.

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names
context information

Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

India history and geogprahy

Amarāvatī (अमरावती) is a relatively recent name for this site and its environs. The ancient name, Dhānyakaṭaka and its variant Dharanikoṭa, appears in numerous inscriptions. Perhaps the earliest reference to Dhānyakaṭaka appears on a pillar with several narratives, now in the Amarāvatī Site Museum. Along with several episodes from the life of the Buddha, the pillar in question, dated to the first century BCE, includes a depiction of a village scene and a river, which is labeled “Dhamnakada.”

Source: Google Books: Shifting Stones, Shaping the Past

Amaravatī (अमरवती) was a great centre of Buddhism. An inscription from Amaravati, dated Ś. 1102, states that “there isa city named Dhānyakaṭaka..., where god Buddha, worshipped by the creator, is quite close, (and) where (there is) a very lofty Caitya, well decorated with various sculptures”. The great Caitya, mentioned here, seems to be identical with the famous Amaravatī-stupa.

Source: Eastern Calukyas: Administration and Culture (buddhism)India history book cover
context information

The history and of India includes names of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as historical dynasties, rulers, tribes and various local traditions, languages and festivals. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

amarāvatī (अमरावती).—f (S) The name of Indra's capital in Swarga.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

amarāvatī (अमरावती).—f The name of indra's capital in svarga.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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