Akshayatritiya, Akshaya-tritiya, Akṣayatṛtīyā: 11 definitions

Introduction:

Akshayatritiya means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Akṣayatṛtīyā can be transliterated into English as Aksayatrtiya or Akshayatritiya, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Akshayatritiya in Purana glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Akṣayatṛtīyā (अक्षयतृतीया).—The third day of Śuklapakṣa of the month Vaiśākha. It is all the more important if Kṛttikā happens to be the nakṣatra of that day. A prayer to Janārdana on that day accompanied by fasting is equal to performing the Rājasūya.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 65. 1-7.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

[«previous next»] — Akshayatritiya in Ayurveda glossary
Source: Knowledge Traditions & Practices of India: Agriculture: A Survey

Akshaya Tritiya is the name of a Hindu and Jain harvest festival.—In India as in every country, agriculture was an integral part of popular culture and gave rise to annual fairs, cattle melas, festivals and rituals, all of which were occasions for celebration. Almost every part of India had its own dates and customs for the purpose: Akshaya Tritiya, for instance, a Hindu and Jain festival, is now often taken to be an auspicious day for buying gold, but it is also a harvest festival in parts of western and northern India.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

[«previous next»] — Akshayatritiya in Jainism glossary
Source: archive.org: Trisastisalakapurusacaritra

Akṣayatṛtīyā (अक्षयतृतीया) refers to the first festival of Vaiśākha (Rādha), according to chapter 1.3 [ādīśvara-caritra] of Hemacandra’s 11th century Triṣaṣṭiśalākāpuruṣacaritra (“lives of the 63 illustrious persons”): a Sanskrit epic poem narrating the history and legends of sixty-three important persons in Jainism.

Accordingly,

“[...] then, knowing the rules for giving alms free from faults, [Śreyāṃsa] said to the Lord [Ṛṣabha], ‘Take this juice which is suitable’. The Lord put together his hands and held out a dish made from his hands; Śreyāṃsa, lifting up the pitchers of cane-juice in succession, emptied them. The juice, though much, was contained in the Blessed One’s hand-dish; but his joy at that time was not contained in Śreyāṃsa’s heart. Then the juice in the Master’s hand congealed into a lofty pillar. Certainly the Lords have powers unthought of. Then the Blessed One broke his fast with that juice; but the eyes of gods, asuras, and men (were fed) by the nectar of the sight of him. [...] This inexhaustible gift was made on the bright third of Rādha and that was the beginning of the present-day festival of Akṣayatṛtīyā. Beginning with Śreyāṃsa the duty of giving originated on earth, just as the course of all practices and laws with the Master”

Note: During Akṣayatṛtīyā, oblations are made to deceased parents. A pot full of water, a fan, and a pair of shoes are given to a priest for the use of the dead father during the hot season.—(cf. Hindu Holidays, p. 5).

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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India history and geography

[«previous next»] — Akshayatritiya in India history glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Akṣaya-tṛtīyā.—(EI 4, 23; CII 4; IA 18; BL), same as Vai- śākha su-di 3; see akṣata-tṛtīyā. Note: akṣaya-tṛtīyā is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Akshayatritiya in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Akṣayatṛtīyā (अक्षयतृतीया).—the festival falling on the third day of the bright half of Vaiśākha (the first day of (satyayuga), which is said to secure permanence to all actions performed on that day (vaiśākhe māsi rājendra śukla- pakṣe tṛtīyikā | akṣayā sā tithiḥ proktā kṛttikārohiṇīyutā || tasyāṃ dānādikaṃ sarvapakṣayaṃ samudāhṛtam).

Akṣayatṛtīyā is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms akṣaya and tṛtīyā (तृतीया).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Akṣayatṛtīyā (अक्षयतृतीया).—f.

(-yā) The third day of the lunar half of the month of Vaisak'ha. (April-May.) E. akṣaya durable, and tṛtīyā the third day: the consequences of meritorious actions performed on this day being permanent, as it is the first day of the Satya Yuga or the anniversary of creation.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Akṣayatṛtīyā (अक्षयतृतीया):—[=a-kṣaya-tṛtīyā] [from a-kṣaya] f. Name of a festival (the third day of the bright half of Vaiśākha, which is the first day of the Satya-yuga, and secures permanency to actions then performed).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Goldstücker Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Akṣayatṛtīyā (अक्षयतृतीया):—[karmadharaya compound] f.

(-yā) A Hindu festival: the third day of the lunar half of the month Vaiśākha (April-May). E. akṣaya durable, and tṛtīyā the third day: the consequences of meritorious actions performed on this day being permanent, as it is the first day of the Satya Yuga or the anniversary of creation.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Akṣayatṛtīyā (अक्षयतृतीया):—[a-kṣaya-tṛtīyā] (yā) 1. f. A particular lunar day in April-May.

[Sanskrit to German]

Akshayatritiya in German

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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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