Akshasutra, Akṣasūtra, Aksha-sutra, Akṣasūtrā: 13 definitions

Introduction:

Akshasutra means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit terms Akṣasūtra and Akṣasūtrā can be transliterated into English as Aksasutra or Akshasutra, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Akshasutra in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Akṣasūtrā (अक्षसूत्रा).—She was the wife of the sage Āpastamba. She was a very chaste woman. (See under Āpastamba).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Akṣasūtra (अक्षसूत्र).—Given to Vāmana by Pulaha: adorns Agastya, (also akṣamālā) (s.v.).*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 61. 36; 245. 87.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Akshasutra in Shaktism glossary
Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

1) Akṣasūtra (अक्षसूत्र) refers to a “rosary” and represents one of the attributes of Viṣṇu, according to the second recension of the Yogakhaṇḍa of the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly: “[...] Then, after the goddess Kumārikā had heard Vyāsa’s words, she hid her Māyā nature from him and assumed (her) Vaiṣṇava form. Viṣṇu held a conch, discus, mace and rosary [i.e., akṣasūtra]. Stainless (nirañjana), he wore yellow clothes and, mounted on Garuḍa, he was radiant. Keśava, that is, Janārdhaka, was accompanied by Mahālakṣmī. (He), the god Hari, born from a lotus womb, is the imperishable cause (of all things). [...]”.

2) Akṣasūtra (अक्षसूत्र) refers to a “rosary”, according to Abhinava’s Tantrāloka verse 6.2-4.—Accordingly, “The places are said to be of three kinds: in the vital breath, in the body and outside (the body). The breath is five-fold in the body. (Thus, place) is of two kinds, according to whether it is outside (the body) or within (it). The external (places) are the maṇḍala, the sacrificial ground (sthaṇḍila), the (sacrificial) vessel (pātra), the rosary (akṣasūtra), the book (pustaka), the Liṅga, the skull (tūra), the cloth (paṭa), the image (made of papier-mâché) (pusta), the idol (pratimā), and the divine effigy (mūrti). Thus the outer (place) is of eleven kinds (each which are of) countless varieties. ”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Akshasutra in Shaivism glossary
Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram (shaivism)

Akṣasūtra (अक्षसूत्र) [=Akṣasūtraka?] refers to a “rosary” and represents one of the attributes of Svacchanda, according to the Śrīmatottara-tantra, an expansion of the Kubjikāmatatantra: the earliest popular and most authoritative Tantra of the Kubjikā cult. Accordingly, “O goddess, Svacchanda is in the middle, within the abode of the triangle. Very powerful, he has five faces with three times five flaming eyes. [...] O fair lady, my attributes—trident, dagger, sword, the king of the snakes, and rosary [i.e., akṣasūtraka]—adorn the right (arms). O beloved, a skull, double-headed drum, javelin, noose and goad—(these) are my divine, brilliant and very auspicious weapons that (are held) in the left (hands). The king of snakes (hangs) on the shoulder and a garland of skulls hangs (from the neck). There is a necklace of scorpions around the throat and the ears are adorned with snakes. [...]”.

Source: SOAS University of London: Protective Rites in the Netra Tantra

1) Akṣasūtra (अक्षसूत्र) is another name for the Rudrākṣa, according to the Netratantra of Kṣemarāja: a Śaiva text from the 9th century in which Śiva (Bhairava) teaches Pārvatī topics such as metaphysics, cosmology, and soteriology.—Accordingly, [verse 9.19cd-26, while instructing to visualize Sadāśiva in order to worship the formless Amṛteśa]—“[He] resembles the swelling moon, a heap of mountain snow. Five-faced, large-eyed, ten-armed, [and] three-armed, [he] has a serpent as a sacred thread. He is covered in a garment made of tiger skin. [He] sits in the bound lotus pose atop a white lotus, [holding] a trident, blue lotus, arrow, rudrākṣa [e.g., akṣasūtra], [and] a mallet. [...]”.

2) Akṣasūtra (अक्षसूत्र) refers to a “rosary” (in a dream), according to the Svacchanda-tantra.—Accordingly, [verse 4.8-13, while describing auspicious dreams]—“[...] [It is auspicious when one dreams of] a pill, wood for cleaning the teeth, yellow pigment on a sword or sandal, sacred thread, ointment, nectar, mercury, medicinal herbs, śakti, a water jar, lotus, rosary (akṣasūtra), red arsenic or blazing objects of siddhas, which have red chalk as their ends. [...]”

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Akshasutra in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Akṣasūtra (अक्षसूत्र).—[akṣāṇāṃ mālā -sūtram]

1) a rosary, string of beads (akārādikṣakārāntaḥ akṣaḥ tatkṛtā tatpratinidhibhūtā vā mālā); कृतो- ऽक्षसूत्रप्रणयी तया करः (kṛto- 'kṣasūtrapraṇayī tayā karaḥ) Kumārasambhava 5.11,66; °मालामुपयाचितुमागतोऽस्मि (mālāmupayācitumāgato'smi) K.151. (It is made of rudrākṣa seeds, corals, crystals, rubies, gems &c.)

2) Name of अरुन्धती (arundhatī) (akṣamālā tvarundhatī Hm.); अक्ष- माला वसिष्ठेन संयुक्ताधमयोनिजा (akṣa- mālā vasiṣṭhena saṃyuktādhamayonijā)...जगामाभ्यर्हणीयताम् (jagāmābhyarhaṇīyatām) Manusmṛti 9.23. मातङ्गयामक्षमालायां गर्हितायां रिरंसया (mātaṅgayāmakṣamālāyāṃ garhitāyāṃ riraṃsayā) | Bu. ch.4.77. (akṣasya nakṣatracakrasya māleva bhūṣaṇatvāt; sā hyuttarasyāṃ diśi gagane saptarṣimaṇḍale mālārūpeṇa vasiṣṭhasamīpe vartate sarvebhyaścojjvalatvāttasyā mālārūpeṇa sthitatvācca nakṣatracakrabhūṣaṇatvam Tv).

Derivable forms: akṣasūtram (अक्षसूत्रम्).

Akṣasūtra is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms akṣa and sūtra (सूत्र). See also (synonyms): akṣamālā.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Akṣasūtra (अक्षसूत्र).—n.

(-traṃ) A rosary, a string of eleocarpus seeds so used. E. akṣa and sūtra a thread.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Akṣasūtra (अक्षसूत्र):—[=akṣa-sūtra] [from akṣa > akṣ] n. a string or rosary of Eleocarpus seeds.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Goldstücker Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Akṣasūtra (अक्षसूत्र):—[tatpurusha compound] n.

(-tram) A rosary, a string of eleocarpus seeds so used. E. akṣa and sūtra.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Akṣasūtra (अक्षसूत्र):—[akṣa-sūtra] (traṃ) 1. n. A rosary.

[Sanskrit to German]

Akshasutra in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Akshasutra in Kannada glossary
Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Akṣasūtra (ಅಕ್ಷಸೂತ್ರ):—[noun] = ಅಕ್ಷವಲಯ [akshavalaya].

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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