Akhila, Akhilā: 23 definitions

Introduction:

Akhila means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Akhil.

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Akhila (अखिल) refers to the “everything”, according to the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, “The Fire (bhargojāta) at the upper end of the universe emits everything [i.e., akhila] into the middle of it, as it does into the end. Then, having again checked it above the universe in the supreme End of the Sixteen, the Fire (bhargojāta) enters the first and supreme Śāmbhava plane”.

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (shaktism)

Akhila (अखिल) refers to “all (prosperities)”, according to the King Vatsarāja’s Pūjāstuti called the Kāmasiddhistuti (also Vāmakeśvarīstuti), guiding one through the worship of the Goddess Nityā.—Accordingly, “[...] I uninterruptedly remember [you], the Vidyā leading to the ultimate well-being, embodiment of bliss, the cause of the extension of all prosperities (akhila-artha-vilāsa-hetu). [You are] the primordial one, the insurpassable Kalā. You are Bālā, the beloved of Kulanātha (namely, Śiva). [Your] glory is incomparable, and you are filled with many felicities”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Akhila (अखिल) refers to “all” (i.e., everything), according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.4.—Accordingly, as Umā (Durgā/Satī) spoke to the Gods:—“[...] Hear further, O Viṣṇu, O Brahmā, O sages and O gods, the divine sports of the supreme lord Śiva, that protect the universe. [...] The lord Śiva did this just to show the behaviour of a love-lorn lover. He blabbered like a lover in despair due to separation. But really the supreme lord has no aberrations, is not distressed and remains unconquered. My master Śiva is perfect, lord of all [i.e., akhila-īśvara] and the controller of illusion. [...]”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Kavya (poetry)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (kavya)

Akhila (अखिल) refers to the “complete (birth ritual)”, according to Kālidāsa’s Raghuvaṃśa verse 3.18.—Accordingly: “When the complete (akhila) birth ritual was done by the ascetic chaplain who had come from the grove of ascetics, Dilīpa’s son shone yet more, like a precious stone taken from a mine and then polished”.

Kavya book cover
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Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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Pancaratra (worship of Nārāyaṇa)

Source: Universität Wien: Sudarśana's Worship at the Royal Court According to the Ahirbudhnyasaṃhitā

Akhila (अखिल) refers to the “entire (realm)”, according to the Ahirbudhnyasaṃhitā, belonging to the Pāñcarātra tradition which deals with theology, rituals, iconography, narrative mythology and others.—Accordingly, “Then he shall obtain land extending as far as the whole earth with [all of its] cities. Siddhas, Gandharvas and Dānavas will be subdued forever. On earth he will rule over the entire (akhila) realm of the Three Worlds. [...]”.

Pancaratra book cover
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Pancaratra (पाञ्चरात्र, pāñcarātra) represents a tradition of Hinduism where Narayana is revered and worshipped. Closeley related to Vaishnavism, the Pancaratra literature includes various Agamas and tantras incorporating many Vaishnava philosophies.

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In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names

Chief woman disciple of Sikhi (Bu.xxi.21); the Commentary calls her Makhila. BuA.204; also J.i.41.

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Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

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Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: academia.edu: A Study and Translation of the Gaganagañjaparipṛcchā

Akhila (अखिल) refers to “complete (words)”, according to the Gaganagañjaparipṛcchā: the eighth chapter of the Mahāsaṃnipāta (a collection of Mahāyāna Buddhist Sūtras).—Accordingly, “Then, they [the twenty-four types of pratibhāna—‘eloquence’] are accomplished by means of the following twenty-four preparations (parikarma). What are the twenty-four? [...] (13) he becomes one who has unassailable eloquence since he never despise the poor, the suffering and the unprotected; (14) he becomes one who has imperishable eloquence on teaching the analysis of words since he applies himself to the dharma of others and gives imperishable treasures; (15) he becomes one whose eloquence is luminous and splendid since he is endowed with the actions of true words, complete words (akhila-vacana), and no harsh word; [...]”.

Mahayana book cover
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Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

Akhila (अखिल) refers to “completely”, according to the 11th century Jñānārṇava, a treatise on Jain Yoga in roughly 2200 Sanskrit verses composed by Śubhacandra.—Accordingly, “The doctrine protects all [beings] that are mobile and immobile with regard to the occurrence of misfortune. It also comforts [them] completely (akhila) with a stream of the liquid ambrosia of happiness. The rain clouds, wind, sun, moon, earth, ocean and Indra—those, which are protected by the doctrine, are of service to the whole world”.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

akhila (अखिल).—a S All or every one; the whole quantity or number.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

akhila (अखिल).—a All; entire.

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Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Akhila (अखिल).—a. [nāsti khilaṃ avaśiṣṭaṃ yasya Tv.]

1) Whole, entire, complete; oft. with सर्व (sarva). एतद्धि मत्तोऽधिजगे सर्वमेषोऽखिलं मुनिः (etaddhi matto'dhijage sarvameṣo'khilaṃ muniḥ) Manusmṛti 1.59; °लेन (lena) entirely.

2) Not uncultivated or fallow, ploughed (land); °आत्मन् (ātman) the universal spirit.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Akhila (अखिल).—mfn. (laḥ-lā-laṃ) All, entire, E. a neg, and khila separated.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Akhila (अखिल).—adj., f. . 1. entire, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 1, 59. 2. all, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 1, 144. ºlena, instr. entirely, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 1, 107.

Akhila is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms a and khila (खिल).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Akhila (अखिल).—[adjective] having no gap or void, whole, entire; [instrumental] wholly, completely. [neuter] all, everything.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Akhila (अखिल):—[=a-khila] mf(ā)n. without a gap, complete, whole

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Goldstücker Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Akhila (अखिल):—[bahuvrihi compound] m. f. n.

(-laḥ-lā-lam) All, entire, complete. (akhilena instr. used adverbially: entirely, completely.) E. a priv. and khila.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Akhila (अखिल):—[a-khila] (laḥ-lā-laṃ) a. All, entire.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Akhila (अखिल) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Akhila, Ahila.

[Sanskrit to German]

Akhila in German

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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Akhila (अखिल) [Also spelled akhil]:—(a) whole, all, entire, pan—.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

Akhila (अखिल) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Akhila.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Akhila (ಅಖಿಲ):—[adjective] not incomplete; whole; entire.

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Akhiḷa (ಅಖಿಳ):—[adjective] = ಅಖಿಲ [akhila].

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Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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