Akarmaka: 13 definitions

Introduction:

Akarmaka means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Akarmak.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Akarmaka in Purana glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Akarmaka (अकर्मक).—A class of Piśācas.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 7. 379.
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Vyakarana (Sanskrit grammar)

Source: Shodhganga: Vaiyākaraṇabhūṣaṇasāra: a critical study

Akarmaka (अकर्मक).—Intransitive which does not require or expect any object to be covered by its activity. The grammarians hold that the verbal activity and its fruit are centred in one and the same substratum in the case of the intransitive roots.

Source: Wikisource: A dictionary of Sanskrit grammar

Akarmaka (अकर्मक).—Intransitive, without any object, (said with regard to roots which cannot possess an object or whose object is suppressed or ignored). The reasons for suppression are briefly given in the well-known stanza ; धातोरर्थान्तरे वृत्तेर्धात्वर्थेनोपसंग्रहात् । प्रसिद्धेरविवक्षातः कर्मणोऽकर्मिकाक्रिया ॥ (dhātorarthāntare vṛtterdhātvarthenopasaṃgrahāt | prasiddheravivakṣātaḥ karmaṇo'karmikākriyā ||) In the case of intransitive roots, the verbal activity and its fruit are centred in one and the same individual viz. the agent or कर्ता (kartā) cf. फलव्यापारयोरेकनिष्ठतायामकर्मकः (phalavyāpārayorekaniṣṭhatāyāmakarmakaḥ) Vāk. Pad.

context information

Vyakarana (व्याकरण, vyākaraṇa) refers to Sanskrit grammar and represents one of the six additional sciences (vedanga) to be studied along with the Vedas. Vyakarana concerns itself with the rules of Sanskrit grammar and linguistic analysis in order to establish the correct context of words and sentences.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

akarmaka (अकर्मक).—a (S) In grammar. Intransitive or neuter.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

akarmaka (अकर्मक).—a Intransitive or neuter.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Akarmaka (अकर्मक).—a. [nāsti karma yasya ba. kap] Intransitive; फलव्यापारयोरेकनिष्ठतायामकर्मकः (phalavyāpārayorekaniṣṭhatāyāmakarmakaḥ) Bhartṛhari.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Akarmaka (अकर्मक).—[adjective] having no object, intransitive.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Akarmaka (अकर्मक):—[=a-karmaka] [from a-karman] mfn. (in [grammar]) intransitive.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Goldstücker Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Akarmaka (अकर्मक):—[bahuvrihi compound] m.

(-kaḥ) (In grammar.) Having no direct object, intransitive (as a verb). See akarman. E. akarman, samāsānta aff. kap.

[Sanskrit to German]

Akarmaka in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Akarmaka in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Akarmaka (अकर्मक) [Also spelled akarmak]:—(a) intransitive (verb).

context information

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Akarmaka (ಅಕರ್ಮಕ):—[adjective] (gram.) acting on or for oneself; representing action confined to the agent; having no object but oneself, to pass on the action; intransitive.

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Akarmaka (ಅಕರ್ಮಕ):—[noun] a verb that does not require a direct object; an intransitive verb.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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