Akalika, Ākālika, Akālika: 10 definitions

Introduction

Akalika means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra

Akālika (अकालिक, “timeless”) refers to a quality of the Dharma associated with the “recollection of the Dharma” (dharmānusmṛti), representing one of the Anusmṛti (eight recollections), according to the 2nd century Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra chapter 36.—Accordingly, “the Dharma is independent of time (akālika). The Dharma of the Buddha acts independently of time and gives its fruit independently of time. Among the heretics (tīrthika), some rules hold when the sun has not risen but do not hold when the sun has risen; some hold when the sun has risen but do not hold when the sun has not risen; yet others are valid in the daytime but are not valid at night, and finally some hold at night but do not hold in the daytime. In the Dharma of the Buddha, time does not intervene: when one has cultivated the noble Eightfold Path (āryāṣṭāṅgik-mārga), one attains Nirvāṇa”.

Moreover, we speak of time when a long time is necessary to obtain the fruit, but once the fruit is obtained, there is no further question of time. Thus, when a good dye (rañjana) has penetrated the cloth, it is fixed; it is the same for a person whose mind is pure: as soon as he has heard the Dharma, he is tinged with it and he obtains the purity of the Dharma eye. Therefore the Dharma is ‘independent of time’ (akālika).

Mahayana book cover
context information

Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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India history and geogprahy

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

A-kālika.—(CII 1), ‘not restricted to time’. Note: a-kālika is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

ākālika (आकालिक).—a S Untimely, unseasonable, mal apropos.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

ākālika (आकालिक).—a Untimely.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Ākālika (आकालिक).—a. [akāle bhavaḥ ṭhañ] (- f.)

1) Momentary, transitory; Ms.4.13 एतानाकालिकान्विद्यादनध्यायानृतावपि (etānākālikānvidyādanadhyāyānṛtāvapi) 15; आकालिकः स्तनयित्नुः (ākālikaḥ stanayitnuḥ); आकालिकी विद्युत्, उत्पत्त्यनन्तरं विनाशिनीत्यर्थः (ākālikī vidyut, utpattyanantaraṃ vināśinītyarthaḥ) P.V.1.114.

2) Unseasonable, premature, untimely; आकालिकिं वीक्ष्य मधुप्रवृत्तिम् (ākālikiṃ vīkṣya madhupravṛttim) Ku.3.34; आकालिकं सपदि दुर्दिनमन्तरिक्षम् (ākālikaṃ sapadi durdinamantarikṣam) Mk.5.1.

-kī Lightning.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Akālika (अकालिक).—adj. (= Pali id.; epithet of dhamma; also [Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit] āk°, q.v.), immediate, not dependent on lapse of time (said of dharma-vinaya): Mahāvastu iii.200.10, see s.v. ehipaśyika.

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Ākālika (आकालिक).—adj. (= [Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit] and Pali akālika; Sanskrit only adv. akālikam; so in Mahābhārata Cr. ed. 1.99.42 °kam for Calcutta (see LV.) Bomb. °kaḥ), immediate, not dependent on any lapse of time, epithet of dharma: Mahāvyutpatti 1294; Śikṣāsamuccaya 323.6. In a like con- text ak° occurs.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ākālika (आकालिक).—mfn.

(-kaḥ-kī-kaṃ) 1. Momentary, instantaneous. 2. Unseasonable, improper with respect to time. f. (-kī) Lightning. E. a neg. kāla time, ṭhak affix, fem. ṅīp.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ākālika (आकालिक).—adj., f. , i. e. I. a-kāla + ika, Unseasonable, [Kumārasaṃbhava, (ed. Stenzler.)] 3, 34. Ii. ā-kāla + ika, What must be deferred till the same time next day, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 4, 103.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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