Ajya, Ājya: 11 definitions

Introduction

Ajya means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Ājya (आज्य) refers to “ghee”, as defined in the Śivapurāṇa 1.15. Accordingly, “a charitable gift given to a needy person yields the utmost benefit. If it is given after entreaties it yields only half the benefit. [...] Gift of ghee (ājya-dāna) is nourishing and that of cloth is conducive to long life”.

Ājya (ghee) is mentioned as one of the five Pañcagavya (five cow-products), according to the Śivapurāṇa 1.16. Accordingly, “[...] the ceremonial ablution of the phallic emblem (liṅga) with Pañcagavya on Sundays is specially recommended. Pañcagavya is the compound of cow’s urine (gojala), dung (gomaya), milk (kṣīra), curd (dadhi) and ghee (ājya). Milk, curd and ghee can severally be used with honey and molasses. The offering of rice cooked in cow’s milk must be made with the syllable Om”.

Source: archive.org: Nilamata Purana: a cultural and literary study

Ājya (आज्य) refers to “purified butter”, forming part of a common diet in ancient Kashmir (Kaśmīra) as mentioned in the Nīlamatapurāṇa.—Ājya is mentioned as an unguent for Viṣṇu’s image and a gift for the Brāhmaṇas (verse 421). Most of the references to the articles of diet occur in the Nīlamata in connection with the offerings made to the gods but it is not difficult to infer from them the food and drink of the common people because “what a man eats his gods eat”.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1a) Ājya (आज्य).—Good to be seen first after rising from one's bed;1 as a sacrificial offering.2

  • 1) Bhāgavata-purāṇa X. 70. 12; Vāyu-purāṇa 29. 30.
  • 2) Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa IV. 1. 98; Vāyu-purāṇa 100. 103.

1b) One of the nine sons of Sāvarṇi.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 100. 22.

1c) Four kinds of.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa IV. 1. 98-100.
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Dharmashastra (religious law)

Source: Sacred Texts: The Grihya Sutras, Part 2 (SBE30)

Ājya (आज्य) refers to “any kind of substance made of fresh butter”, according to the Āpastamba-yajña-paribhāṣā-sūtras.—“If it is said, juhoti, ‘he sacrifices’, it should be known that sarpir ājya, melted butter, is meant”. Commentary: “Sarpis is here taken as an adjective, running; yad asarpat tat sarpir abhavat”. Ājya is explained as navanītavikāradravyajātīyavacanaḥ sabdaḥ, i.e. a word signifying any kind of substance made of fresh butter.

According to the Aitareya-Brāhmaṇa I, 3, “Ājya is sweet or fragrant to the gods, ghṛta to men, ayuta to the manes, navanīta to children”. Here the commentator explains that ājya is butter, when melted (vilīnaṃ sarpis), ghṛta, when hardened. Ayuta, sometimes called astu, is butter, when slightly melted, niṣpakva, when thoroughly melted. According to Kātyāyana I, 8, 37, ājya is of different kinds. It may be simple ghṛta, which, as a rule, should be made of the milk of cows. But in the absence of ājya, the milk of buffaloes (māhiṣa), or oil (taila), or sesam-oil (jārtila), or linseed oil (atasīsneha), &c., may be taken.

Dharmashastra book cover
context information

Dharmashastra (धर्मशास्त्र, dharmaśāstra) contains the instructions (shastra) regarding religious conduct of livelihood (dharma), ceremonies, jurisprudence (study of law) and more. It is categorized as smriti, an important and authoritative selection of books dealing with the Hindu lifestyle.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Shodhganga: Dietetics and culinary art in ancient and medieval India

Ājya (आज्य) refers to “ghee” according to the 17th century Bhojanakutūhala (dravyaguṇāguṇa-kathana), and is commonly found in literature dealing with the topics of dietetics and culinary art, also known as Pākaśāstra or Pākakalā.—In the Ājya or “ghee” group of foodstuffs, the following substances are beneficial (hita) to the body: Gobhava (ghee derived from cow-milk).

Ājya (ghee) when prepared from goat’s milk is mutually incompatible (viruddhāhāra) with fruit of Lakuca (the fruit of bread-fruit tree).

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

ājya (आज्य).—n S Clarified butter of ajā or She-goat. Hence, clarified butter gen.

--- OR ---

ājya (आज्य).—a S Relating to the goat.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

ājya (आज्य).—n Clarified butter. a Relating to the goat.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Ājya (आज्य).—[ājyate, ā-añj-kyap]

1) Clarified butter, ghee; मन्त्रोऽहमहमेवाज्यम् (mantro'hamahamevājyam) Bg.9.16. आज्यधूमोद्गमेन (ājyadhūmodgamena) Ś.1.15; (it is often distinguished from ghṛta; sarpirvilīnamājyaṃ syād ghanībhūtam ghṛtaṃ bhavet).

2) (In a wider sense) Oil, milk &c used instead of clarified butter; घृतं वा यदि वा तैलं पयो वा दधि यावकम् । आज्यस्थाने नियुक्तानामाज्यशब्दो विधीयते (ghṛtaṃ vā yadi vā tailaṃ payo vā dadhi yāvakam | ājyasthāne niyuktānāmājyaśabdo vidhīyate) ||

3) Name of a sort of chant or religious service (sāmastomabhedaḥ); आजिमीयुस्तस्मादाज्यानामाज्यत्वम् (ājimīyustasmādājyānāmājyatvam) Nir.

4) Turpentine.

Derivable forms: ājyam (आज्यम्).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ājya (आज्य).—i. e. ā-añj + ya, n. Butter in a liquid state, which is poured on a sacrificial fire.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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