Ajapa: 10 definitions

Introduction:

Ajapa means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, biology. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Yoga (school of philosophy)

Source: ORA: Amanaska (king of all yogas): A Critical Edition and Annotated Translation by Jason Birch

Ajapā (अजपा) refers to the “so'ham mantra”, according to the Śivayogadīpikā by Sadāśivayogīśvara: a text dealing with Śaivism and Haṭhayoga in two hundred and eighty-nine verses.—Accordingly, while describing Haṭhayoga techniques: “Mantrayoga is natural [prāṇāyāma], Layayoga is modified [prāṇāyāma], Haṭhayoga is called Kevalakumbhaka and Rājayoga is the no-mind [state]. The first is the Yoga of the so'ham mantra [i.e., ajapā], and [the second] is the absorption of the breath in the [internal] resonance. After that, [Haṭhayoga] is steadiness of the mind and breath, and the fourth [Rājayoga] is the absence of mental activity. The fourth is obtained through the cessation of the breath. Therefore, you should become an adept of [this] practice and one devoted to prāṇāyāma”.

Yoga book cover
context information

Yoga is originally considered a branch of Hindu philosophy (astika), but both ancient and modern Yoga combine the physical, mental and spiritual. Yoga teaches various physical techniques also known as āsanas (postures), used for various purposes (eg., meditation, contemplation, relaxation).

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Biology (plants and animals)

Source: Google Books: CRC World Dictionary (Regional names)

Ajapa in India is the name of a plant defined with Crateva nurvala in various botanical sources. This page contains potential references in Ayurveda, modern medicine, and other folk traditions or local practices It has the synonym Crateva religiosa var. nurvula (Buch.-Ham.) Hook. f. & Thomson (among others).

Example references for further research on medicinal uses or toxicity (see latin names for full list):

· Gen. Index to Transactions of the Linnean Society of London (1867)
· Journal of Botany (1874)
· Fl. Ins. Austr. (1786)
· Gard. Bull. Straits Settlem. (1939)
· Transactions of the Linnean Society of London (1827)
· Biol. Journal of the Linnean Society (1970)

If you are looking for specific details regarding Ajapa, for example chemical composition, extract dosage, side effects, health benefits, diet and recipes, pregnancy safety, have a look at these references.

Biology book cover
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This sections includes definitions from the five kingdoms of living things: Animals, Plants, Fungi, Protists and Monera. It will include both the official binomial nomenclature (scientific names usually in Latin) as well as regional spellings and variants.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Ajapa (अजप).—[aspaṣṭaṃ japati nindārthe nañ, jap-ac] A Brāhmaṇa who does not (properly) repeat his prayers (kupāṭhaka); अजपा ब्राह्मणास्तात शूद्रा जपपरायणाः । भविष्यन्ति कलौ (ajapā brāhmaṇāstāta śūdrā japaparāyaṇāḥ | bhaviṣyanti kalau) Mb.; one who reads heretical works.

-pā [prayatnena na japyā aprayatno- ccāritatvāt; karmaṇi ac] Name of a Mantra called हंस (haṃsa), which consists of a number of inhalations an exhalations (śvāsapraśvāsayoḥ bahirgamanāgamanābhyām akṣaraniṣpādanarūpo japaḥ sa ca haṃsaḥ so'ham ityākāra eva ucchvāsaireva niśvāsairhaṃsa ityakṣaradvayam | tasmātprāṇaśca haṃsākhya ātmākāreṇa sasthitaḥ ||)

Derivable forms: ajapaḥ (अजपः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ajapa (अजप).—m.

(-paḥ) 1. A reader of works considered heterodox. 2. Agoatherd. f. () 1. A particular mantra or mystical formula employed by the Tantrikas, the essence of which is in the letters H and S, whence it is termed the Hansa mantra 2. Siva and Sakti combined, to which form, the mantra is particularly, addressed. mfn.

(-paḥ-pā-paṃ) 1. Who or what does not perform the Japa. 1. Cherishing or feeding goats. E. a not; and japa silent prayer; or aja a goat, and pa who protects.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ajapa (अजप).—[masculine] goat-herd.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Ajapa (अजप):—[=aja-pa] [from aja > aj] a m. a goat-herd.

2) [=a-japa] 1. a-japa m. (√jap), one who does not repeat prayers

3) [v.s. ...] a reciter of heterodox works, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) Ajapā (अजपा):—[=a-japā] [from a-japa] f. the mantra or formula called haṃsa (which consists only of a number of inhalations and exhalations).

5) Ajapa (अजप):—[=aja-pa] 2. aja-pa m. See 1. aja.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Goldstücker Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ajapa (अजप):—I. [tatpurusha compound] m.

(-paḥ) 1. A goat-herd. E. aja and pa. 2. A reader of works considered heterodox. E. a deter. and japa. Ii. [bahuvrihi compound] f.

(-pā) The name of a particular mantra or mystical formula, otherwise bearing the name of Haṃsa. E. a priv. and japa; so called from its not consisting of a japa or a prayer repeated inaudibly, like other mantras, but of a certain number of inhalations and exhalations.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Ajapa (अजप):—[a-japa] (paḥ) 1. m. A reader of heterodox works; a goat-herd.

2) Ajapā (अजपा):—[a-japā] (pā) 1. f. A mantra; an image half male and half female.

[Sanskrit to German]

Ajapa in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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