Aja, aka: Ajā; 17 Definition(s)

Introduction

Aja means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shilpashastra (iconography)

[Aja in Shilpashastra glossaries]

Aja (अज):—First of the eleven emanations of Rudra (ekādaśa-rudra), according to the Viśvakarma-śilpa. Aja has sixteen arms. In the right hands he keeps the śūla, aṅkuśa, kapāla, ḍamaru, sarpa, mudgara, akṣamālā and sudarśana (chakra); of the left hands, one is held in the tarjanī pose, while the others carry the gadā, khaṭvāṅga, paṭiśa (a sharp edged iron rod), ghaṇṭa, śakti, paraśu and kamaṇḍalu.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Elements of Hindu Iconograpy
Shilpashastra book cover
context information

Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

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Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

[Aja in Natyashastra glossaries]

One of the Hands of Famous Emperors.—For the great Kings Raghu and Aja, Ardha-patāka hands as aforesaid are used respectively right and left.

(Source): archive.org: The mirror of gesture (abhinaya-darpana)

Aja (अज).—Description of a women of goat (aja) type;—A woman who is thin, has small arms and breasts, moving red eyes, short hands and feet, is covered with fine hairs, and is timid, shy of water, fond of forests, restless, swiftly moving, and has many offsprings, is said to have the nature of a goat (aja).

(Source): archive.org: Natya Shastra
Natyashastra book cover
context information

Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Purana

[Aja in Purana glossaries]

1) Aja (अज):—Son of Raghu (son of Dīrghabāhu). He had a son named Daśaratha. (see Bhāgavata Purāṇa 9.10.1)

2) Aja (अज):—Son of Ūrjaketu (son of Sanadvāja). He had a son named Purujit. (see Bhāgavata Purāṇa 9.13.22)

(Source): Wisdom Library: Bhagavata Purana

Aja (अज) falls under the category of domesticated animals (grāmya-paśu) according to the Vāyu Purāṇa.

Aja. It is born of the Creator’s mouth. It is included in the list of grāmya-paśus. It is a useful animal in yajñas (as a victim) along with cows, mahiṣas, aśvas, hastins, and birds. It is said that at the end of the Kali age people will be keeping aja, eḍaka, khara and uṣṭra as their pet animals. At the time of the birth of Skanda Kārtikeya, Vāyu gave him mayūra and kukkuṭa; lord Svayaṃbhū gave him aja and Śiva gave him meṣa as presents.

(Source): Google Books: Cultural History from the Vāyu Purāna

1) Aja (अज).—A king of the Solar dynasty. Genealogy. From Viṣṇu were descended in order: Brahmā, Marīci-Kaśyapa-Vivasvān-Vaivasvata-Ikṣvāku-Vikukṣi-Saśāda-Purañjaya-Kukutstha-Anenas-Pṛthulāśvā-Prasenajit-Yuvanāśva-Mandhātā-Purukutsa-Trasadasyu-Anaraṇya-Aryaśva-Vasumanas-Sudhanvā-Traiyāruṇa-Satyavrata-Triśaṅku-Hariścandra-Rohitāśva-Harita-Cuñcu-Sudeva-Bharuka-Bāhuka-Sagara-Asamañjas-Aṃśumān-Dilīpa-Bhagīratha-Śrutanābha-Sindhudvīpa-Ayutāyus-Ṛtuparṇa-Sarvakāma-Sudāsana-Mitrasakha-Kalmāṣapāda-Aśmaka-Mūlaka-Dilīpa-Dīrghabāhu-Raghu-Aja-Aja’s son Daśaratha-Daśaratha’s son, Śrī Rāma.

Mahābhārata, Anuśāsana Parva, Chapter 115, Verse 75 says that Aja never used to take meat. (See full article at Story of Aja from the Puranic encyclopaedia by Vettam Mani)

2) Aja (अज).—Among the different kinds of Ṛṣis mentioned by Yudhiṣṭhira, we find a class of Ṛṣis called Ajas. (Mahābhārata, Śānti Parva, Chapter 26). These Ajas had attained Heaven by Svādhyāya (self discipline) alone.

3) Aja (अज).—King Jahnu had a son named Aja. Uśika was the son of this Aja. King Uśika prayed to Indra for a son. Indra himself was born as the son of Uśika assuming the name Gādhi. Satyavatī was born as the daughter of Gādhi. She was married to Ṛcīka. Paraśurāma’s father, Jamadagni was the son of Ṛcīka. (Mahābhārata, Śānti Parva, Chapter 49).

4) Aja (अज).—By the grace of Śiva Surabhī was able to purify herself by penance. She then gave birth to Aja, Ekapāt, Ahirbudhnya, Tvaṣṭā and Rudra. (Agni Purāṇa, Chapter 18).

5) Aja (अज).—In the first Manvantara* Svāyambhuva, in the second Manvantara Svārociṣa and in the third Manvantara Uttama, were Manus. To the third Manu, Uttama, were born as sons Aja, Paraśu, Dīpta and others. (Viṣṇu Purāṇa, Part 3, Chapter 1).

Besides the above, the term Aja has been used to mean Sūrya, Śiva, Brahmā, Viṣṇu, Śrī Kṛṣṇa and Bīja (seed).

*) One Manvantara is a period equal to 4,320,000 human years or equal to (1/4)th day of Brahmā.

(Source): archive.org: Puranic Encyclopaedia

1a) Aja (अज).—A name of Brahmā.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa II. 4. 19; Vāyu-purāṇa 73. 62; 98. 54.

1b) A son of Pratihartā and Stuti.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa V. 15. 5.

1c) A Rudra, and a son of Bhūta and Sarūpā.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa VI. 6. 17.

1d) The son of Raghu, and father of Daśaratha. (Burnouf makes Aja, son of Pṛthuśravas. But Pṛthuśravas here is an adjective of Raghu meaning—highly renowned).*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa IX. 10. 1; Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 63. 184; Vāyu-purāṇa 88. 183: Viṣṇu-purāṇa IV. 4. 85-6.

1e) The son of Ūrdhvaketu and father of Purujit.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa IX. 13. 22.

1f) A Tuṣita god.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 36. 10.

1g) A son of Uttama Manu.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 36. 39; Vāyu-purāṇa 61. 185; 62. 9. 34; Viṣṇu-purāṇa III. 1. 15.

1h) A Kūṣmāṇḍa Piśāca, one of the two sons of Kapī. Had a daughter Jantudhanā.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 7. 74-85.

1i) An attribute of Kumāra.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 10. 48.

1j) A Sudhamāna god.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa IV. 1. 60.

1k) A horse of the chariot of the moon.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 126. 52.

1l) (and Ajā)—the one god and goddess; mystery of; Ajā, eight letters, sixteen hands, and feet, four faces, three knots of hair, one horned goddess—Māyā.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 20. 28-29.

1m) A son of Bhṛgu.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 65. 87.

1n) A division of the night.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 66. 43.

1o) The name of a Dānava.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 68. 11.

1p) The name given to Dhanvantari when he first appeared out of the churning of the ocean for nectar.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 92. 10.

2) Ajā (अजा).—Born of Yaśodā—Māyā (s.v);1 the energy of the Creator—through her, Hari is spoken of in nine forms.2

  • 1) Bhāgavata-purāṇa X. 3. 47; 13. 52.
  • 2) Ib., XI. 9. 28; XII. 11. 31.
(Source): Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

[Aja in Ayurveda glossaries]

Aja (अज) is a Sanskrit word referring to the animal “goat”, the meat of which is used as a medicinal substance throughout Āyurvedic literature. It was documented by Caraka in his Carakasaṃhitā sūtrasthāna (chapter 27), a classical Āyurvedic work. Goat (and sheep) cannot be easily assigned to groups because of their mixed habitat. The meat of the goat is not too cold, too heavy and too unctuous, does not vitiate doṣas, because of similarity with dhātus it protes the bulk of body and does not block the channels.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany
Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Vaishnavism (Vaishava dharma)

[Aja in Vaishnavism glossaries]

Ajā (अजा) refers to the nineteenth of twenty-six ekādaśīs according to the Garga-saṃhitā 4.8.9. Accordingly, “to attain Lord Kṛṣṇa’s mercy you should follow the vow of fasting on ekādaśī. In that way You will make Lord Kṛṣṇa into your submissive servant. Of this there is no doubt”. A person who chants the names of these twenty-six ekādaśīs (eg., Ajā) attains the result of following ekādaśī for one year.

(Source): Devotees Vaishnavas: Śrī Garga Saṃhitā
Vaishnavism book cover
context information

Vaishnava (वैष्णव, vaiṣṇava) or vaishnavism (vaiṣṇavism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshipping Vishnu as the supreme Lord. Similar to the Shaktism and Shaivism traditions, Vaishnavism also developed as an individual movement, famous for its exposition of the dashavatara (‘ten avatars of Vishnu’).

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Itihasa (narrative history)

[Aja in Itihasa glossaries]

Aja (अज) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. XIV.8) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Aja) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

(Source): JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places
context information

Itihasa (इतिहास, itihāsa) refers to ‘epic history’ and represents a branch of Sanskrit literature which popularly includes 1) the eighteen major Puranas, 2) the Mahabharata and 3) the Ramayana. It is a branch of Vedic Hinduism categorised as smriti literature (‘that which is remembered’) as opposed to shruti literature (‘that which is transmitted verbally’).

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General definition (in Hinduism)

[Aja in Hinduism glossaries]

Aja (अज), Ajā (अजा).—This is the ordinary name for goat in the Ṛgveda and the later literature. The goat is also called Basta, Chāga, Chagala. Goats and sheep (ajāvaya) are very frequently mentioned together. The female goat is spoken of as producing two or three kids, and goat’s milk is well known. The goat as representative of Pūṣan plays an important part in the ritual of burial. The occupation of a goatherd (ajapāla) was a recognized one, being distinguished from that of a cowherd and of a shepherd.

(Source): archive.org: Vedic index of Names and Subjects

Aja was a King of the solar dynasty, the son of Nabhaga. He is the father of Dasharatha, and thus the grand-father of Rama.

(Source): Apam Napat: Indian Mythology

Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[Aja in Pali glossaries]

aja : (m.) goat. || ajā (f.) she-goat.

(Source): BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

Ajā, (f.) a she-goat J.III, 125; IV, 251. (Page 10)

— or —

Aja, (Vedic aja fr. aj (Lat. ago to drive), cp. ajina) a hegoat, a ram D.I, 6, 127; A.II, 207; J.I, 241; III, 278 sq.; V, 241; Pug.56; PvA.80.

—eḷaka (Sk. ajaiḍaka) goats & sheep D.I, 5, 141; A.II, 42 sq., 209; J.I, 166; VI, 110; Pug.58. As pl. °ā S.I, 76; It.36; J.IV, 363. —pada goat-footed M.I, 134. —pāla goatherd, in °nigrodharukkha (Npl.) “goatherds’Nigrodha-tree” Vin.I, 2 sq. Dpvs.I, 29 (cp. M Vastu III, 302). —pālikā a woman goatherd Vin.III, 38. —lakkhaṇa “goat-sign”, i. e. prophesying from signs on a goat etc. D.I, 9 (expld. DA.I, 94 as “evarūpānaṃ ajānaṃ mansaṃ khāditabbaṃ evarūpānaṃ na khāditabban ti”). —laṇḍikā (pl.) goats’dung, in phrase nāḷimattā a. a cup full of goats’dung (which is put down a bad minister’s throat as punishment) J.I, 419; DhA.II, 70; PvA.282. —vata “goats’habit”, a practice of certain ascetics (to live after the fashion of goats) J.IV, 318.

aja-pada refers to a stick cloven like a goat’s hoof; so also at Vism.161. (Page 9)

(Source): Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary
Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

[Aja in Marathi glossaries]

aja (अज).—a S Unborn, uncreate. Used of God. Ex. aja ajita pūrṇa anāma || Uncreate, sovereign lord, who knoweth his name? Ex. mī aja ajita sarvēśrvara || mīca naṭalōṃ carācara || In these examples ajita has the force of Haud ulli secundus. See phrase under ajita.

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aja (अज).—ind ( P From.) The name of the line drawn over the items of a paper of accounts: also of the column, and of the several places or lines of it, in which are set down the sums or numbers total of the monies or goods (disbursed, received, purchased, sold). 2 From. Esp. in official papers. ajīṃ nasaṇēṃ Not to be even in the aja (gross total); i. e. not to be at all, to be wanting utterly. Ex. ajīṃ ḍabbī nāhīṃ tapakīra kōṇhīkaḍē pāhavī. ajī bāda or ta-karaṇēṃ. ajīṃ vajā karaṇēṃ To deduct from the aja or gross total. Hence, ajīṃ & ajī- bāda with neg. con. come to signify, None or not at all; and to be used sometimes in the other senses of agadīṃ q. v. Moreover ajībāda, further corrupted into ajābāda, will be used in almost all the senses given under acānaka. The acceptations and uses of words introduced from the Arabic, Persian, and Hindustani are absolutely lawless. ajīṃ vajā karaṇēṃ further expresses an ordinary mode of peculation;--to abstract from the aja or gross amount before bringing it to account by taphaśīla or detail.

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aja (अज).—m S A he-goat.

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ajā (अजा).—f (S) A she-goat. 2 Illusion, unreality, ideality of the universe. ajākṛpāṇīyanyāya The maxim of the sword upon the neck of the goat. Expressive of meekness and absolute helplessness.

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ajā (अजा).—m (ārya S) A grand-father, pat. or mat. Pr. ajyāsa nātū śikavitō.

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āja (आज).—ad (ādya S) To-day. The word divasa is often added to it; as ājacā divasa.

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āja (आज).—& its phrases ājīṃ nasaṇēṃ &c. See under aja.

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ājā (आजा).—m (ādya or ārya S) A grandfather pat. or mat. Pr. ājyāsa nātū śikavitō.

(Source): DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

aja (अज).—a Unborn. m A he-goat.

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ajā (अजा).—f A she-goat. Illusion, ideality of the universe.

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āja (आज).—ad To–day.

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ājā (आजा).—m A grandfather. ājā mēlā nātū jhālā There was a death and a birth, hence, no difference in the number of mouths to feed.

(Source): DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

[Aja in Sanskrit glossaries]

Aja (अज).—a. [na jāyate; jan-ḍa. na. ta.] Unborn, existing from all eternity; यो मामजमनादिं च वेत्ति लोकमहेश्वरम् (yo māmajamanādiṃ ca vetti lokamaheśvaram) Bg.1. 3; अजस्य गृह्णतो जन्म (ajasya gṛhṇato janma) R.1.24.

-jaḥ 1 The 'unborn', epithet of the Almighty Being; न हि जातो न जायेऽहं न जनिष्ये कदाचन । क्षेत्रज्ञः सर्वभूतानां तस्मादहमजः स्मृतः (na hi jāto na jāye'haṃ na janiṣye kadācana | kṣetrajñaḥ sarvabhūtānāṃ tasmādahamajaḥ smṛtaḥ) || Mb.; also a Name of Viṣṇu, Śiva or Brahmā.

2) The (individual) soul (jīvaḥ) अजो नित्यः शाश्वतोऽयं पुराणो न हन्यते हन्यमाने शरीरे (ajo nityaḥ śāśvato'yaṃ purāṇo na hanyate hanyamāne śarīre) Bg.2.2.

3) A ram, he-goat (ajena brahmaṇā dakṣayajñabhaṅgasamaye meṣarūpagrahaṇena palāyamānatvāt ajādhiṣṭhitarūpavattvāt meṣasya upacārāt ajatvam Tv.]

4) The sign Aries.

5) A sort of corn or grain; ajairyaṣṭavyaṃ tatrājā vrīhayaḥ Pt.3.

6) Mover, leader (Ved.), said of Indra, Maruts, &c.; a drove.

7) Name of a mineral substance (mākṣikadhātu).

8) Name of the Moon or Kāmadeva (āt viṣṇorjāyate iti; cf. candramā manaso jātaḥ).

9) A vehicle of the sun.

1) Name of the father of Daśaratha and grand-father of Rāma; so called because he was born on the Brāhma Muhūrta.

11) Name of a Ṛiṣi. cf. अजो हरौ हरे कामे विधौ छागे रघोः सुते (ajo harau hare kāme vidhau chāge raghoḥ sute) | Nm.

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Ajā (अजा).—[na jāyate ityajā]

1) (According to Sāṅkhya Philosophy) Prakṛti or Māyā, the verse which refers to अजा (ajā), (ajāmekāṃ lohitaśuklakṛṣṇām &c.) is interpreted by the Vedāntins as referring to the प्रकृति (prakṛti) consisting of तेजस्, अप् (tejas, ap) and अन्न (anna), See Ś. B.

2) A she-goat.

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Āja (आज).—a. (- f.) [अजस्येदं-अण् (ajasyedaṃ-aṇ)] Coming from, belonging to, or produced by, goats; आजेन मासान्प्रीयन्ते पञ्चैव पितरो नृप (ājena māsānprīyante pañcaiva pitaro nṛpa) Mb.13.88.6.

-jaḥ A vulture.

-jam 1 Ghee or clarified butter.

2) Throwing.

(Source): DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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