Ahuta, Āhuta: 13 definitions

Introduction:

Ahuta means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Ahut.

In Hinduism

Dharmashastra (religious law)

Source: Google Books: Manusmṛti with the Manubhāṣya

Ahuta (अहुत).—One of the five sacrifices (pañcayajña).—The sacrifice that has been described as ‘Ahuta’ is the same as ‘Japa’. ‘Japa’ here should be taken as standing for Vedic study, in view of the assertion that ‘by Vedic study one should worship the sages’. Or, it may be taken in the sense of the mental operation of ‘recalling to the mind’ (of Vedic texts). The root ‘japa’ has been held to be denotative of both acts—that of loudly reciting, as well as that of silently recalling to the mind. (See the Manubhāṣya verse 3.74)

Dharmashastra book cover
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Dharmashastra (धर्मशास्त्र, dharmaśāstra) contains the instructions (shastra) regarding religious conduct of livelihood (dharma), ceremonies, jurisprudence (study of law) and more. It is categorized as smriti, an important and authoritative selection of books dealing with the Hindu lifestyle.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Āhūta (आहूत) refers to an “invitation” (i.e., to visit one’s house), according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.2.28. Accordingly as Śiva said to Satī:—“[...] O gentle lady, those who go to another man’s house without being invited (an-āhūta) attain disrespect which is more serious than even death. Even the prosperous Indra and people like him going to another man’s house in such a context become worthless. What then about others? A journey of such a nature is futile”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

āhūta (आहूत).—p S Called, summoned, invited.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Ahuta (अहुत).—a.

1) Not sacrificed or offered (as an oblation); अवश्यं याति तिर्यक्त्वं जग्ध्वा चैवाहुतं हविः (avaśyaṃ yāti tiryaktvaṃ jagdhvā caivāhutaṃ haviḥ).

2) Wrongly sacrificed; न चाहुतमभूत्तत्र (na cāhutamabhūttatra) Rām.1.14.4.

3) One who has not yet received any oblation.

-taḥ Religious meditation, prayer, and the study of the Vedas (considered as one of the five great Yajñas and necessary duties); अहुतं च हुतं चैव तथा प्रहुतमेव च। ब्राह्मं हुतं प्राशितं च पञ्च यज्ञान् प्रचक्षते (ahutaṃ ca hutaṃ caiva tathā prahutameva ca| brāhmaṃ hutaṃ prāśitaṃ ca pañca yajñān pracakṣate) || Ms.3.73.74.

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Āhuta (आहुत).—p. p. Offered to the gods, sacrificed.

-tam 1 An offering made to men, hospitality.

2) The nourishment of all created beings (bhūtayajña or manuṣyayajña), regarded as one of the five principal sacrifices of the Hindus cf. पञ्चमहायज्ञ (pañcamahāyajña).

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Āhūta (आहूत).—p. p.

1) Called, invoked, invited; यियक्षमाणेनाहूतः पार्थेनाथ द्विषन्मुरम् (yiyakṣamāṇenāhūtaḥ pārthenātha dviṣanmuram) Śi.2.1.

2) Named, called.

-tam Calling.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ahuta (अहुत).—mfn.

(-taḥ-tā-taṃ) Unoffered, unsacrificed. 2. Uncalled, unsummoned. m.

(-taḥ) Religious meditation and prayer, considered as one of the five great sacraments. E. a neg. hu to sacrifice, or hve to call, kta aff.

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Āhuta (आहुत).—n.

(-taṃ) The nourishment of all created beings, considered as one of the five sacraments or principal sacrifices of the Hindus. E. āṅ before hu to offer oblations, and kta aff.

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Āhūta (आहूत).—mfn.

(-taḥ-tā-taṃ) Called, summoned, invoked, invited. E. āṅa before hve to call, kta aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ahuta (अहुत).—[adjective] unoffered, unsacrificed; not worshipped with or not attained by sacrifice; [masculine] a muttered prayer, unaccompanied by sacrifices.

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Āhuta (आहुत).—[adjective] sacrificed or worshipped with sacrifices, put into the fire.

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Āhūta (आहूत).—[adjective] called, invoked, invited, summoned, challenged.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Ahuta (अहुत):—[=a-huta] mfn. unoffered, not yet offered (as a sacrificial oblation), [Atharva-veda xii, 4, 53; Śatapatha-brāhmaṇa; Manu-smṛti xii, 68]

2) [v.s. ...] one who has not received any sacrifice, [Atharva-veda vii, 97, 7]

3) [v.s. ...] (the fire) through or in which no sacrificial oblation has been offered, [Āpastamba-dharma-sūtra]

4) [v.s. ...] not obtained by sacrifice, [Atharva-veda vi, 71, 2]

5) [v.s. ...] m. religious meditation, prayer (considered as one of the five great sacraments, otherwise called Brahma-yajña), [Manu-smṛti iii, 73 [sequens]]

6) Ahūta (अहूत):—[=a-hūta] mfn. uncalled, unsummoned, [Ṛg-veda x, 107, 9.]

7) Āhuta (आहुत):—[=ā-huta] [from ā-hu] mfn. offered as an oblation, sacrificed, [Ṛg-veda; Atharva-veda; Śāṅkhāyana-śrauta-sūtra]

8) [v.s. ...] laid in the fire (as a corpse), [Ṛg-veda x, 16, 5]

9) [v.s. ...] offering made to men, hospitality (= manuṣya-yajña q.v.), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

10) [v.s. ...] nourishment of all created beings (considered as one of the five principal sacrifices of the Hindūs; cf. bhūta-yajña), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

11) Āhūta (आहूत):—[=ā-hūta] [from ā-hve] mfn. called, summoned, invoked, invited.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Ahuta (अहुत):—[a-huta] (taḥ-tā-taṃ) a. Uncalled, unoffered. m. Meditation.

2) Āhuta (आहुत):—[ā-huta] (taṃ) n. Nourishment; a sacrament of the Hindus.

3) Āhūta (आहूत):—[ā-hūta] (taḥ-tā-taṃ) p. Called.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Āhūta (आहूत) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Āhūa.

[Sanskrit to German]

Ahuta in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Āhūta (आहूत) [Also spelled ahut]:—(a) invited, summoned.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Āhuta (ಆಹುತ):—[adjective] offered as oblation; sacrificed.

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Āhuta (ಆಹುತ):—

1) [noun] the courteous treatment of, hospitality extended to, guests.

2) [noun] offering of food, extending courtesy to all beings, being considered as one of the five virtues.

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Āhūta (ಆಹೂತ):—[adjective] called in or for; invited.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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