Ahoratra, Ahorātra, Ahan-ratra: 16 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Ahoratra means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Ahoratra in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Ahorātra (अहोरात्र) refers to the period of “one day and one night”, consisting of 21,600 niśvāsas (respirations), according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.1.10, while explaining the span of life of the deities (Brahmā, Viṣṇu and Hara):—“[...] in the case of all living beings, Brahmā, Viṣṇu, Hara, Gandharvas, serpents, Rākṣasas, etc., twenty one thousand six hundred respirations constitute the period of one day and one night (ahorātra), O foremost among Devas. Six respirations constitute the period of time one Pala. Sixty such Palas constitute one Ghaṭī. Sixty Ghaṭīs constitute one day and one night. (6 x 60 x 60 = 21600). There is no limit to the number of respirations of Sadāśiva. Hence He is undecaying”.

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Ahorātra (अहोरात्र).—(See under Kālamāna).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Ahorātra (अहोरात्र).—A day and a night; 30 muhūrtas For pitṛs —kṛṣṇapakṣa and śuklapakṣa (one month); for Devas one full year is one day.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 13. 112; Matsya-purāṇa 1. 19; 142. 5-6, 9; Vāyu-purāṇa 65. 59; 66. 37. Ā
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Discover the meaning of ahoratra in the context of Purana from relevant books on Exotic India

Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

Source: Wikibooks (hi): Sanskrit Technical Terms

Ahorātra (अहोरात्र).—1. A day and night, a nychthemeron. 2. The day radius i.e., the radius of the diurnal circle. Note: Ahorātra is a Sanskrit technical term used in ancient Indian sciences such as Astronomy, Mathematics and Geometry.

Jyotisha book cover
context information

Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

Discover the meaning of ahoratra in the context of Jyotisha from relevant books on Exotic India

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: archive.org: Vagbhata’s Ashtanga Hridaya Samhita (first 5 chapters)

Ahorātra (अहोरात्र) refers to “day and night”, mentioned in verse 3.52 of the Aṣṭāṅgahṛdayasaṃhitā (Sūtrasthāna) by Vāgbhaṭa.—Accordingly, “[...] when hungry, one shall turn to bitter, sweet, astringent, and light food, [...]; to water (that is) heated by the beams of the hot-rayed one (and) cooled by the beams of the cold-rayed one, and this thoroughly day and night [viz., ahorātra]; (that is) detoxicated by the (heliacal) rising of Canopus, pure, called ‘swan-water’, devoid of dirt, (and) destructive of dirt”.

Note: Ahorātra (“day and night”) has been represented more emphatically by ñin mthsan gñi-gar (“both day and night”), gñis-kar in CD being an alternative spelling of gñi-gar (corrupted to gñid-gar in N).

Source: gurumukhi.ru: Ayurveda glossary of terms

Ahorātra (अहोरात्र):—1 Day and 1 night = 24 hours

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

Discover the meaning of ahoratra in the context of Ayurveda from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

ahōrātra (अहोरात्र).—m n (S) A day of twenty-four hours or thirty Muhurtt; the period from sunrise to sunrise.

--- OR ---

ahōrātra (अहोरात्र).—ad S pop. ahōrātrīṃ ad Day and night. 2 (By the ignorant.) During or through the whole night.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

ahōrātra (अहोरात्र) [-trīṃ, -त्रीं].—ad Day and night. ahōrūpa mahōdhvaniḥ: m Mutual adulation.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

Discover the meaning of ahoratra in the context of Marathi from relevant books on Exotic India

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Ahorātra (अहोरात्र).—

-tram also)

Derivable forms: ahorātraḥ (अहोरात्रः).

Ahorātra is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms ahan and rātra (रात्र).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ahorātra (अहोरात्र).—m.

(-traḥ) A day of twenty-four hours or thirty Muhurtas, from sun-rise to sun-rise. n. or ind. (-tram) Day and night, continually, always. E. ahan a day, and rātri a night.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ahorātra (अहोरात्र).—i. e. ahan-rātra, m. and n. A day of twenty-four hours or thirty muhūrtas, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 1, 64.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ahorātra (अहोरात्र).—[masculine] [neuter] day and night; vid† [adjective] knowing [drama] & [neuter]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Ahorātra (अहोरात्र):—[=aho-rātra] [from aho > ahar] a m. [plural] [Vājasaneyi-saṃhitā]; [dual number], [Atharva-veda] & [Pbr.]; sg. or [plural], [Mahābhārata] etc. or n. [plural] [Ṛg-veda x, 190, 2; Vājasaneyi-saṃhitā] etc.; [dual number], [Atharva-veda; Vājasaneyi-saṃhitā] etc.; sg. or [dual number] or [plural], [Manu-smṛti; Mahābhārata] etc. = ahar-niśa (q.v.), a day and night, νυχθήμερον, (having twenty-four hours or thirty Muhūrtas);

2) [=aho-rātra] [from aho-ratna] b See, [ib.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ahorātra (अहोरात्र):—(traḥ) 1. m. A day of 24 hours. n. Day and night.

[Sanskrit to German] (Deutsch Wörterbuch)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Sanskrit-Wörterbuch in kürzerer Fassung

Ahorātra (अहोरात्र):—m. n. νυχθἠμερον.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of ahoratra in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

See also (Relevant definitions)

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: